What Is A Chicago Dog? (Question)

  • A Chicago-style hot dog, Chicago Dog, or Chicago Red Hot is an all-beef frankfurter on a poppy seed bun, originating from the city of Chicago, Illinois. The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard, chopped white onions, bright green sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle spear, tomato slices or wedges, pickled sport peppers and a dash of celery salt.

Contents

What is in a Chicago dog?

Make this classic Chicago-style Hot Dog at home! It’s loaded with yellow mustard, sweet pickle relish, tomatoes, onions, dill pickles, sport peppers, and finished with celery salt. Named for the city where this iconic dish was created, the Chicago Hot Dog is a crunchy, juicy mouthful of an all-beef hot dog.

What makes a Chicago hot dog different?

So, just what is on a Chicago style dog? Well, it starts with a steamed poppy seed bun and an all-beef frankfurter. Then it’s topped with yellow mustard, bright green relish, fresh chopped onions, juicy red tomato wedges, a kosher-style pickle spear, a couple of spicy sport peppers and finally, a dash of celery salt.

Why is it called a Chicago dog?

They made so much money they used the proceeds to invest in a larger business and named it after the pinnacle of sausage cities, Vienna Beef. To this day Vienna uses the original natural-casing, all-beef recipe developed by Jewish immigrants that gives the Chicago dog its distinctive flavor profile, snap, and texture.

What does a Chicago dog look like?

The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard, chopped white onions, bright green sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle spear, tomato slices or wedges, pickled sport peppers and a dash of celery salt. The complete assembly of a Chicago hot dog is said to be “dragged through the garden” due to the many toppings.

Do Chicagoans put ketchup on hotdogs?

While there is no definitive reason, Grub Street states that the Chicago-style hot dog simply does not need ketchup and that the addition of this unnecessary condiment ruins the already-perfect flavor balance.

What kind of relish is on a Chicago dog?

Chicago-style relish is a type of sweet pickle relish typically used on Chicago-style hot dogs. The unique color of the relish, often referred to as “neon green”, is created by adding blue dye to regular pickle relish.

Why are Chicago dogs so good?

Despite its special place in the city’s heart, the Chicago-style dog’s origins only stretch back to the Great Depression in the ’30s, when its hearty helping of toppings could provide Chicagoans with calories and nutrition on the cheap. But Chicago-style dogs were “really a product of the Great Depression. …

Why is there no ketchup on Chicago hot dogs?

Jimmy Faruggia, who opened Jimmy’s Red Hots in 1954 on the west side, believed ketchup was used to cover up the rotten taste of spoiled meat. He maintained his hot dogs were too fresh to be covered up – and Jimmy’s has never offered ketchup since it opened.

Are Chicago-style hot dogs beef or pork?

There’s a reason Chicago hot dogs are all-beef. Samuel Ladany and Emil Reichel were Jewish, so their recipe is pure beef—no pork. Today Vienna Beef and its offspring, Red Hot, are the two primary suppliers of hot dogs in the Chicago area. Our top hot dog picks are also all-beef.

What is the original Chicago hot dog?

A true Chicago Dog has seven specific ingredients: chopped white onion, neon green sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle spear, a tomato slice (or wedge), pickled sport peppers, and celery salt, all sitting atop an all -beef hot dog on a poppy seed bun.

What are Kelly hot dogs?

Our Chicago Style Beef Hot Dog is formulated and seasoned specifically for Chicago’s hot dog stand operators. Made from the finest cuts of U.S.D.A. inspected beef, seasoned with fresh spices and delicately smoked, this is the traditional Chicago Style Hot Dog.

Why are they called sport peppers?

They are a specific cultivated variety, or cultivar, of Capsicum annuum. The term “sport” probably originated because they are used as condiments on hot dogs sold in baseball parks. They are not related to tabascos, which are Capsicum frustescens.

Are Chicago dogs steamed?

A Chicago Style Hot Dog is a steamed all beef Hot Dog topped with yellow mustard, bright green relish, onions, tomato wedges, pickle spear or slice, sport peppers and a dash of celery salt served in the all-important steamed poppy seed bun.

Does Sonic have a Chicago Dog?

The Chicago Dog – Got love for the Windy City? Then try SONIC’s Premium Beef Chicago Dog. A 100% pure beef hot dog topped with pickle, relish, tomato, sport peppers, celery salt and mustard all served up in a soft, warm poppy seed bun.

Are Chicago dogs steamed or grilled?

Traditionally, Chicago-style dogs are boiled, not grilled.

Chicago-style hot dog – Wikipedia

Chicago-style hot dog

Alternative names Red Hot
Course Main course
Place of origin United States
Region or state Chicago,Illinois
Serving temperature Hot
Main ingredients Sausage,poppy seedbun,yellow mustard,white onion,sweet “neon green” pickle relish,sport peppers,tomatoes,kosher dill picklespear,celery salt
  • The third phase entails demonstrating to your dog that there are other options than food as a reward. Instead of giving your dog a reward, you might put him on the sofa and give him a gentle rub while praising him for his good manners. Verbal praise can be used first, followed by some physical exertion. Ask him with more orders along the route, then continue walking as a reward. In the long run, your dog will be content with the fact that you are content. In order to make you pleased, he will perform. See this post for 11 crate training tips that truly work for some further information. In addition, the FDA has conducted a study into the possibility of a link between certain diets and canine dilated cardiomyopathy. There are some further sources:1/2/3

Hot dog in the Chicago style served with duck fat fries. A Chicago-style hot dog, often known as a Chicago Dog or a Chicago Red Hot Dog is an all-beeffrankfurter on an apoppy seedbun that originated in the city ofChicago, in the state of Illinois. Toppings for the hot dog include mustard, chopped white onions, brilliant green sweet pickle relish, adill picklespear, tomato slices or wedges, pickled sport peppers, and a pinch of celery salt. Due to the large number of toppings on a Chicago hot dog, it is stated that the entire assembly must be “dragged through the garden.” According to the vendor’s preferences, the method of cooking the hot dog varies.

Ketchup is not included in the official recipe because it is commonly considered objectionable by many Chicagoans and fans, who have a strongly held belief that ketchup should not be used.

History

With duck fat fries, this Chicago-style hot dog is a must. An authentic Chicago-style hot dog, often known as a Chicago Dog or a Chicago Red Hot Dog. Chicago-style frankfurter on an apoppy seed bun is a Chicago-style frankfurter that uses just beef. It is topped with yellowmustard, sliced white onions, brilliant green sweet pickle relish, adill picklespear, tomato slices or wedges, pickled sport peppers, and a touch of celery salt, among other ingredients. As a result of the numerous toppings on a Chicago hot dog, the entire assembly is said to be “dragged through the garden.” The process used to prepare the hot dog itself differs based on the vendor’s preferences.

Ketchup is not included in the official recipe because it is largely considered distasteful by many Chicagoans and fans, who hold a strongly held belief that ketchup is an unsuitable condiment.

Variations

Despite the fact that Vienna Beef and Red Hot Chicago, the two most prominent Chicago hot dog manufacturers, heavily promote the “dragged through the garden” style of hot dog, variations are common, with vendors adding cucumber slices or lettuce, omitting poppy seeds or celery salt, and using plain relish or a skinless hot dog as alternatives. A more basic version known as the “Depression Dog” is served at several popular hot dog stands, and it is made with only mustard, onions, plain relish and sport peppers before being wrapped in hand-cut french fries.

A cheese-dog, which is a Chicago-style dog served with cheese sauce, is available from several vendors. Locations of Boz Hot Dogs provide a distinctive nacho cheese sauce made with bits of jalapeo peppers and cheese.

Preparation

Prior to adding the toppings, Chicago-style hot dogs are boiled in boiling water or steamed in a steamer. Char-dogs, which are cooked on a charcoal barbecue, are an uncommon variation on the traditional manner. In addition, char-dogs are readily distinguished from other dogs because the ends of the dog are sometimes chopped in a crisscross pattern before cooking, resulting in a distinctivecervelat-style “curled-x” form while the dog cooks. Only char-dogs are served at certain hot dog stands, such as the Wieners Circle in Vienna, Virginia.

The buns are generally of the S.

A Chicago-style hot dog prepared by the Johnniebeefs restaurant in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America.

Restaurants

Hot dog restaurants outnumber McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King restaurants combined in the Chicago metropolitan region. In Chicago, a “hot dog stand” may also sell a variety of other things, such as the Maxwell Street Polish, gyros, pork chop and Italian beef sandwiches, corn dogs, tamales, pizza puffs, and Italian ice, among others. The names and architectural elements of the eateries are frequently distinctive.

Popular and historic vendors

In 2003, a Chicago hot dog stand opened its doors.

References

  1. ^abcdefg Eat this! The Chicago hot dog, which originated during the Great Depression, according to Leah A. Zeldes on July 7, 2010. Chicago’s RestaurantEntertainment Guide, Inc. is a non-profit organization that promotes dining in the city of Chicago. The original version of this article was published on February 11, 2013. Archived from the original on July 31, 2010
  2. “Vienna Beef Hot Dogs.” “The Periodic Table of Vienna: Chicago Style Hot Dog Condiments.” Obtainable on March 25, 2009
  3. Lynn, you’re very sweet (June 10, 2010). “Hot dogs from Chicago served in the White House.” The Chicago Sun-Times is a newspaper in Chicago, Illinois. On June 13, 2010, the original version of this article was archived. Obtainable on August 1, 2010. Steamed hot dogs are used in Chicago-style hot dogs
  4. AbZeldes, Leah A., et al (July 13, 2010). In order to hold Chicago hot dogs, you need huge buns. Chicago is a great place to eat. Chicago’s Restaurant and Entertainment Guide, Inc. Chicago’s Restaurant and Entertainment Guide, Inc. Vettel, Phil (July 31, 2010)
  5. Retrieved on July 31, 2010
  6. (August 23, 2017). Without a Poppy Seed Bun, a Chicago Hot Dog just isn’t the same. ” “However, why?” The Chicago Tribune published a story about this. Spina, Matthew (May 20, 2016). “A History of the Esteemed Chicago-Style Hot Dog”, Thrillist. Retrieved August 23, 2017. Carruthers, John (August 26, 2016)
  7. Retrieved August 26, 2016. (March 31, 2015). “Mustard and Dreams: What It Takes to Run a Hot Dog Stand in Chicago” is a book on what it takes to run a hot dog stand in Chicago. Serious Eats is a restaurant that specializes on fine dining. On August 26, 2016, Leroux published a paper titled (August 30, 2005). “Chicago hot dogs,” as the saying goes. The Chicago Tribune published a story about this. Tribune Publishing Co. April 28, 2007
  8. AbSmith, Kathie (May 1, 2007). “Chicago’s culinary history.” Retrieved April 28, 2007. Toledo Blade, Block Communications, Toledo Blade. 1 May 2007
  9. AbFluky’s. “How to Make Your Own “Chicago Style Hot Dogs””. Retrieved 1 May 2007. The original version of this article was published on May 4, 2007. “The Chicago Dog,”Hot Dog Chicago Style, which was retrieved on April 28, 2007. It was retrieved on the 18th of July, 2016. Leah A. Zeldes is the author of this work (September 30, 2002). “How to Eat Like a Chicagoan” is a guide to eating like a Chicagoan. The definitive guide to Chicago’s restaurants. The definitive guide to Chicago’s restaurants. On October 1, 2002, the original version of this article was archived. “Chicago-style Hot Dogs and Hot Dog Stands,” which was retrieved on September 30, 2002. h2g2 was created on July 19, 2007. February 4, 2010
  10. Retrieved February 4, 2010
  11. “Chicago Style Hot Dog Recipe Detail” is a recipe detail for a Chicago style hot dog. On August 15, 2008, the original version of this article was archived. Kelly Gibson and Portia Belloc Lowndes are two of the most well-known women in the world (2008). The Slow Food Guide to Chicago includes information on restaurants, markets, and pubs. p. 238. ISBN 978-1-931498-61-6. Published by Chelsea Green Publishing. The date was February 18, 2010. In Chicago, no self-respecting person would consider using ketchup as a condiment
  12. Fodor’s Travel Guide to Chicago 2010. Fodor’s Travel Guides, New York, 2009, p.189, ISBN 978-1-4000-0860-5. The date was February 18, 2010. Avoid putting ketchup on your Chicago-style hot dog: it’s a huge no-no among hot dog connoisseurs. For more information, see “Never Put Ketchup On A Hot Dog, by Bob Schwartz – Home Page” at www.neverputketchuponahotdog.com. The original version of this article was published on November 21, 2015. On November 22, 2015, I was able to obtain Cecil Adams is a fictional character created by author Cecil Adams (August 30, 1991). What’s up with the lack of ketchup on a properly prepared hot dog?, Chicago Reader is a literary magazine published in Chicago, Illinois. On February 22, 2015, I was able to obtain Leah A. Zeldes is the author of this work (July 22, 2010). Does ketchup on hot dogs belong only to barbarians? Retrieved on July 31, 2010 from Chicago’s RestaurantEntertainment Guide, Inc.
  13. AbZeldes, Leah A., “Dining Chicago,” Chicago Tribune (July 6, 2010). “The Chicago-style hot dog is a’masterpiece,'” says the author. Food & Drink in Chicago (Chicago’s Restaurant and Entertainment Guide, Inc.). Retrieved on July 31, 2010
  14. AbBizzari, Amy (2016). Dishes, drinks, and desserts that are synonymous with Chicago. Arcadia, pp. 46–53, ISBN 9781467135511
  15. AbWeller, Sam (August 2002), “Secret Hot Dogs.” Arcadia, pp. 46–53, ISBN 9781467135511
  16. AbWeller, Sam (August 2002), “Secret Hot Dogs.” Linda Rutenberg’s photographs depict the hidden side of Chicago (2nd editition ed.). ECW Press, Toronto, Canada, pp.113–116, ISBN 1-55022-493-X. When two young immigrants from Austria-Hungary traveled to Chicago to exhibit at the World’s Columbian Exposition, they brought their secret frankfurter recipe with them. Today, the Vienna all-beef hot dog recipe is supplied by more than 2,000 vendors across the capital city. In fact, there are more Vienna Beef wiener vendors in the city than there are Burger King, Wendy’s, and McDonald’s outlets combined
  17. According to the Oxford Companion to Food and Drink in America, there are more Vienna Beef wiener vendors than there are Burger King, Wendy’s, and McDonald’s outlets combined. “Hot dog manufacturers throughout town,” according to Leah A. Zeldes on June 21, 2011. Chicago Sun-Times, retrieved on July 17, 2012
  18. Zeldes, Leah A., retrieved on July 17, 2012. (June 21, 2011). “Even without the frills, the Chicago-style hot dog is a cut above the others.” The Chicago Sun-Times is a newspaper in Chicago, Illinois. Meathead (July 1, 2009). “Hot Dog Road Trip: A Patriotic Party Plan.” Retrieved on July 17, 2012. The Huffington Post is a news website. Chicago’s Wiener’s Circle meets its match in Jack McBrayer, Triumph The Insult Comic Dog (Discretion Advised),” according to the Chicago Tribune on November 23, 2015. The Chicagoist published an article on June 15, 2012, titled The original version of this article was published on January 11, 2016. Retrieved November 23, 2015
  19. “Five Guys Offers More Than Burgers. Tribune.com
  20. Leah A. Zeldes is the author of this work (July 8, 2010). The Chicago Restaurant and Entertainment Guide, Inc. says, “Know your wiener!” when it comes to dining in Chicago. The original version of this article was published on July 10, 2011. Chicago’s Restaurant and Entertainment Guide, Inc. (July 30, 2010). “Relishing Chicago’s 10 funniest hot-dog places.” Dining Chicago. Chicago’s Restaurant and Entertainment Guide, Inc. (July 30, 2010). The document was retrieved on July 31, 2010.

Further reading

  • Joe Barrett is a member of the Barrett family (October 26, 2015). “Apple’s new emoji menu is said to include a Chicago-style hot dog symbol,” according to the report. MarketWatch. Obtainable on November 23, 2015
  • Rich Bowen and Dick Fay are the authors of this work (1983). A Chicagoan’s Dining Guide to Hot Dogs and Hamburgers. Chicago: Chicago Review Press, ISBN 0-914091-27-1, OCLC9197138
  • City News Service, ISBN 0-914091-27-1, OCLC9197138
  • (August 28, 2015). “A loaded Chicago Style hot dog will be served at Dodger Stadium during the Cubs series.” The Los Angeles Daily News published a story about this. Obtainable on November 23, 2015

External links

  • At Wikimedia Commons, you may find images and videos related to Hot dog stalls in Chicago.

Chicago Dog Recipe

There are 41 reviews.

  • Five-star ratings: 11, four-star ratings: 16, three-star ratings: 9, two-star ratings: 4, one-star ratings:

Yes, if you use all-beef hot dogs, as illustrated in this recipe, it may be considered a healthy option. However, there is one crucial item lacking. It’s not authentic until it’s served with pickle relish. And never, ever, ever use ketchup in any form. The acid detracts from the flavor of the other components. Member of the Martha Stewart Club Thank you for sharing this “Martha Stewart” recipe with us. It appeared to be simple and healthful, so I decided to give it a try straight immediately.

  • It was a huge hit with both the children and the adults.
  • I’m looking forward to more of your delectable recipes!
  • I’ve been quite fortunate in my life and already possess one.
  • I made the decision at that point that I was not going to let it ruin my life.
  • Advertisement Member of the Martha Stewart Club It’s not often that we get the opportunity to do so many things, and each one should be absolutely fantastic.

For the simple reason that this is our existence. You know, life is short, and then you die, don’t you? As a result, this is what we’ve decided to do with our lives. epoxy for planchers

The Chicago Dog: A History of the Windy City Favorite

A weekly blog series dedicated to one of America’s most treasured meals will be launched to commemorate July as National Hot Dog Month (and National Hot Dog Day on July 17), and will run for the whole month of July. What’s the first order of business? a look back at the famous Chicago Dog’s history Who was the first person to do so? How did they come up with the list of seven delectable toppings? That and other questions will be answered, so grab a Chicago Dog and get your hot dog history fix.

  1. Even though hot dogs have been mentioned hundreds of times throughout history (even in Homer’s renowned epic poem, The Odyssey), the exact location of their beginnings will always be a source of controversy.
  2. Like many other Europeans, Germans began moving to the New World in the nineteenth century, taking their culinary traditions with them.
  3. Source: NPRLegend includes an image of an 1800s hot dog stand.
  4. Charles Feltman, a German immigrant who had settled in Brooklyn, opened the world’s first hot dog stand on Coney Island in 1871.
  5. The popularity of the new meal spread throughout the country, and hot dogs began to appear on menus in restaurants and concession stands.
  6. Feltman’s Hot Dogs, Feltman’s Hamburgers KERA NEWS is the source of this information.
  7. Since then, it has become a mainstay at backyard barbecues, Fourth of July festivities, and baseball games across the United States of America.

(In reality, by the end of the nineteenth century, about 25% of Chicago’s population was either first-generation German or born in Germany!) And this gets us to the next point.

So, where exactly did this delectable canine originate from?

A Chicago Dog wouldn’t be complete without a hot dog made entirely of beef.

It was a wave of Jewish immigrants that brought the all-beef hot dog to Chicago, and they quickly discovered that America’s enthusiasm for the small sausages made hot dog selling a lucrative way to make a livelihood.

Boom.

Jewish immigrants Samuel Ladany and Emil Reichl of Austria-Hungary, like their other compatriots, recognized the financial possibilities in selling hot dogs and went on to develop Chicago’s most beloved hot dog brand, Vienna Beef.

After naming their new business endeavor after Vienna, the metropolis of their country, Vienna Beef was proudly introduced to the world in 1893 and continues to be a Chicago staple to this day.

The bun is a delectable addition that also serves as a distinction.

This crucial detail, on the other hand, would not have been possible without the contribution of a Polish immigrant named Sam Rosen.

After a few years, he decided to venture westward to the Windy City.

Despite the fact that the all-beef hot dog proven to be the cornerstone of the venerable Chicago Dog recipe, Rosen’s poppy seed bun would soon prove to be just as important for the renowned cuisine in the years to come.

While other companies failed, hot dog sellers prospered and established themselves as staples in communities around Chicago as a result of the low cost of the meat and its ability to provide a satisfying, relatively well-balanced dinner for penny-pinching families on a budget.

There were many different versions of hot dogs being “dragged through the garden,” but it quickly became evident that Chicagoans had a favorite combination: sport peppers on a poppy seed bun with mayonnaise, mustard, pickle, relish, onion, tomato, and celery salt on top.

Even though the Chicago Dog recipe became a life-saving (and delicious) staple during the Great Depression, its popularity would spread beyond the city when American soldiers returning home from World War II began bringing the famed tradition to the outskirts of Cook County and the suburbs as they left city life behind to start their own families.

Since then, the Chicago Dog has become an iconic aspect of the city’s culture and culinary experiences both inside and outside of Chicago.

Today, the Chicago-style Hot Dog is revered by hot dog enthusiasts, sports fans, and foodies around the country.

Source: Levy Now you know what I’m talking about!

Stay tuned for our story on the new hot dog recipes that baseball fans may expect to see at big and minor league ballparks this season, which will be published the following week.

What Is the Difference Between a Chicago Dog and a Regular Hot Dog?

Jordana Cohen is the editor of this piece. All of the goods that appear on this page have been hand-picked by our editors. If you make a purchase after clicking on one of our retail links, we may get a commission. Although prime hot dog season has passed, there is no law that says they must only be consumed during the summer months. Furthermore, the classic Chicago dog is substantial enough to serve as an excellent tailgating main course. But what is it about a Chicago-style dog that makes it so recognizable, and how does it differ from a regular hot dog?

Chicago Dogs

Every major city in the United States is recognized for a certain sort of cuisine, andChicagois no exception. We really have a number of culinary claims to renown, including steakhouses, Italian beef, deep-dish pizza, and the Chicago-style hot dog, which we are maybe the most protective of and picky about (see below). While the origins of the Chicago-style hot dog are not completely understood, the Vienna Beef hot dog manufacturer states that the roots may be traced back to the Depression-era, when a hot dog served as a complete meal on a bun could be purchased for just a cent.

It is possible that this history has been tainted by the fact that the World’s Fair was the venue where Vienna Beef, the most popular sort of hot dog in a Chicago-style dog, originally launched its frankfurters, which were introduced during the World’s Fair.

There is basically just one way to construct and enjoy a decent dog in Chicago, whether you’re at Wrigley Field, a hole-in-the-wall greasy-spoon diner with a Vienna Beef sign dangling out front, or a rolling cart out on the street.

Simply defined, if your hot dog consists just of enclosed meat on a plain bun, with or without any additional toppings, you are not eating a Chicago-style hot dog.

The Hot Dog

Only the best will do in this situation. Search high and low for the best all-beef kosher-style hot dog that you can find. It’s important to note that all-beef is essential, and kosher-style cooking almost always ensures that. If you can get your hands on a package of Vienna Beef hot dogs, that’s the very best you can hope for. Red Hot Chicago, another maker, as well as Hebrew National, are both acceptable alternatives. These traditional Vienna Beef dogs are delicately spiced and wrapped in a natural casing, making them the most popular choice.

Don’t be intimidated by the bathtub!

It is also possible to cook them on a grill (in which case they are referred to as “char dogs”) as an acceptable substitute.

The Bun

There is only one type of bun that is appropriate for a Chicago dog, and that is a bun with poppy seeds. There are no exceptions in this case! In fact, the poppy seed bun is so common in Chicago that I, a native Chicagoan, was surprised to learn that the poppy seed bun was a Chicago-only phenomenon when I was on vacation and couldn’t find a decent hot dog bun. This was something I discovered while I was in my twenties. In all seriousness, there isn’t a substitute. Take a standard white-bread bun and roll it in poppy seeds on the outside, and you’ve got yourself a tasty treat.

As you bite into it, you’ll undoubtedly lose a few seeds, both in your lap and between your teeth, but that’s just part of the experience.

Sorry, but you are not allowed to refer to it as a Chicago dog.

If you want to be authentic, Rosen’s buns are the best choice, although any maker can suffice in a hurry.

The Mustard

Yellow mustard in its most basic form. Not Dijon, not hot deli-style with the mustard seeds, but something else entirely. Don’t get me wrong, those are delectable mustards that have a place on a variety of dishes, but a Chicago-style dog isn’t something to write home about. It is sufficient to use a basic shade of yellow. For yellow mustard, look for French’s or any other style that is yellow in color.

The Onions

Onions add a nice crunch and a spicy kick to the dog’s meal. Make coarse slices of white onions (not yellow or red) and sprinkle them on top of the dish before serving. Alternatively, you may grill them; in fact, at both Chicago Cubs ballparks, you can walk up to particular concession stalls and just declare that you’ll be having a hot dog “with,” and they’ll put a hearty amount of grilled onions on top of your hot dog. Most restaurants, on the other hand, will only provide raw onions, and you only need a sprinkle to obtain the flavor.

The Tomatoes

The same may be said about tomatoes. In most cases, they are either thickly sliced raw in semi-circles so that they lay nice and flat on the dog, or small tomato wedges are nestled between the dog and the bun to keep the dog from sliding around. The same as with onions, they provide a little crunch as well as a little juiciness and sweetness to balance off the bite of the onion.

The Sport Peppers

Have you ever heard of a sport pepper before? They’re pickled peppers that are little and somewhat spicy. Even though they do not contain any peppers, they have the appearance of a jalapeo on the outside. In appearance, it is greenish-yellowish in hue, and the flavor is somewhat similar to banana peppers. If you have a sensitivity to heat, you may safely eliminate the sport peppers and still claim the rest of the dog to be authentic Chicago-style in every way. However, if you’ve never had them before, this hot dog is the greatest way to get acquainted with them.

Simply place two or three whole, never cut, peppers on top of your dog’s head and mix well. At this point, you’re probably thinking that there’s no more place for anything in between the sides of your poppy seed bun. But, believe it or not, there is. But you’d be mistaken! Continue reading —

The Relish

Cucumber relish is, in its most basic definition, chopped pickled cucumbers. However, when it comes to savoring a Chicago-style sandwich, the more fluorescent green the hue, the better the sandwich. This relish is sweet, which will help to balance out the heat from the sport peppers in your dish. There are other brands available, but Vienna Beef produces their own that is a solid bet. For those of you who can’t track down any Vienna’s jars, simply seek for a sweet relish that glows in the dark and you should be set.

The Pickle

This is a kosher spear. There’s nothing special about this place. The pickle you want isn’t going to be sweet like a sweet breadbutterpickle; you want the typical sour and crunchy sort. The pickle should be kept in its full-sized spear shape at all times. Many people would believe that the pickle would be served as a side dish or as an accompaniment to the dog, but they would be mistaken. In lieu of this, insert the entire spear of asparagus between the dog and the bun on the side opposite the tomato wedges and cover it with the other toppings.

The Celery Salt

Spear made of kosher meat and bone The design is simple. The pickle you want isn’t going to be sweet like a sweet breadbutter pickle; you want the usual acidic, crunchy sort. To maintain its spear shape, the pickle should be served in its whole. In contrast to what many people might expect, the pickle is not served as a side dish or a companion to the dog. In lieu of this, insert the entire spear of asparagus between the dog and the bun on the side opposite the tomato wedges and eat it with the other toppings.

NO. KETCHUP. EVER.

Photograph courtesy of Brent Hofacker/Shutterstock It is very forbidden to consume ketchup. Yellow mustard is, without a doubt, the only condiment that is suitable. You may do everything else correctly, including adding each and every item stated above, but what happens if you add ketchup? You’ll get sad looks of disapproval from the people in the Chicago area who are sitting near you. What is the severity of this rule? You won’t be thrown in jail or thrown into Lake Michigan, but there’s a hot dog vendor outside the Shedd Aquarium with a sign that says, “must dance for ketchup.” You’ve been warned, and you should heed the warning.

So go ahead and get yourself a poppy seed bun, pile on the toppings, and spend the rest of the summer with the greatest dog in town.

Top It Off

Chowhound created the header picture, which incorporates images from Chowhound and Shutterstock. See more articles on this topic. Comments to be loaded

Get fresh food news delivered to your inbox

Sign up for our newsletter to receive the latest tips, techniques, recipes, and more, sent twice a week to your inbox.

Sign up for our newsletter. By registering, you agree to ourTerms of Use and recognize the data practices outlined in ourPrivacy Policy, which you can read here. You have the option to unsubscribe at any time.

Chicago Hot Dogs

The Chicago Hot Dog, named after the city where this iconic dish was first served, is a crunchy, juicy mouthful of an all-beef hot dog that is served on a bun. It’s “dragged through the garden,” which means it’s topped with a mixture of yellow mustard, sweet pickle relish, fresh tomatoes and onions, a dill pickle spear, spicy pickled chilies known as sport peppers, and a sprinkle of celery salt before being grilled on a grill. The soft hot dog bun serves as a meal and nearly as a salad all in one (preferably with poppy seeds).

  • It won’t be exactly the same, but sometimes getting close enough is sufficient!
  • A little sweetness comes from the relish, a salty crunch comes from the pickle, tang comes from both the mustard and the peppers, and freshness comes from the tomatoes and onions in this hot dog recipe.
  • Plus, everyone has a good time putting together their own when the hot dogs come off the grill, which makes your job even easier.
  • Mike Lang is a professional photographer based in New York City.

The All-Beef Hot Dog is a Chicago Dog Must

The hot dog must be made entirely of beef and encased in natural casing, which gives it a satisfying crunch when biting into it. When you’re in Chicago, the most probable brand you’ll be offered is the world-famous Vienna Beef. In my neighborhood grocery store in New Jersey, I purchase a high-quality brand of all-beef hot dogs in their natural casing (most often Boar’s Head). In order to be as genuine as possible to the hot dog shacks in Chicago, boil the hot dogs before serving them. I prefer to grill mine (thus creating a “char dog”) because I grill a lot in the summer, and summer is the season that I associate most with hot dogs in general.

I don’t go as far as to blacken the skin or form any type of crust since you want the dog to remain somewhat supple so that the snap of the casing can still be felt when the casing is snapped.

The Best Hot Dog Bun

The Chicago dog is traditionally served on a poppy seed bun, thanks to the efforts of an ambitious Polish baker who learned his trade in Germany before settling in Chicago in the early twentieth century. However, his poppy seed buns rapidly gained popularity among German and Polish immigrants yearning for a sense of home in his rye bread.

Nowadays, hot dog vendors steam the buns to make them fluffy and pillowy, which is a popular request. Mike Lang is a professional photographer based in New York City.

What is a Sport Pepper?

It was because to an ambitious Polish baker who mastered his trade in Germany before arriving in Chicago in the early 1900s that the Chicago dog is traditionally served on a poppy seed bun today. He appealed to German and Polish immigrants yearning for a flavor of home in his rye bread, but the poppy seed buns rapidly became popular among the general public as well. To make the buns fluffy and pillowy, hot dog sellers now steam the buns before serving them. Mike Lang is a professional photographer based in Los Angeles, California, USA.

The Sweet Pickle Relish

Sweet pickle relish, available in bright green in Chicago, is revered by hot dog aficionados as a way to enrich the hot dog-eating experience. Or it’s possible that they simply enjoy the radioactive light. However, this relish does not taste any different from the other relishes available on the market; it has just been colored with food dye to get the eye-catching hue.

Swaps and Substitutions

Chicago Hot Dogs are notoriously difficult to come by because of their specific ingredients, but not everyone has access to these Midwest delicacies. The following are a few substitutions that will help you come as close as possible to the real thing.

  • Replace the poppy seed hot dog buns with potato hot dog buns. Make a substitution for the neon green pickle relish with ordinary sweet pickle relish. Sport peppers can be substituted with pickled jalapeo slices or pepperoncinis if desired. Even if you don’t like for the notion of eating whole peppers, pickle spears, or tomato wedges, you can always cut things up to make it a bit more manageable.

Can’t Get Enough Hot Dogs?

  • Hot Dogs with Spicy Kimchi Slaw
  • Chili Dog
  • New Jersey Italian Dog
  • Cheesy Baked Hot Dog
  • Hot Dogs with Sriracha and Asian Slaw

Traditional preparation calls for the sport peppers to be served whole, with the tomatoes being sliced into wedges or slices. If you like, you may dice both of these ingredients to make them easier to consume.

  • 8 hot dogs with natural casing made entirely of meat
  • 8 hot dog buns or potato buns with poppy seeds
  • Yellow mustard for sprinkling on top
  • To use as a topping, use sweet pickle relish. Cut each of the two medium tomatoes into eight wedges. 1 small yellow onion, peeled and sliced 8 spears of dill pickles
  • Whole or sliced, 16 sport peppers or pepperoncini (optional). Celery salt is used as a garnish.
  1. Prepare the grill by doing the following: Preheat a charcoal or gas grill on medium heat (350 degrees Fahrenheit). Before the grill becomes too hot, you should be able to hold your palm over it for around 3 seconds. Grill the hot dogs as follows: Place the hot dogs on the grill and cook until done. Cook for about 8 minutes total, turning them with tongs halfway through. There should be a significant amount of color on them. Place on a serving dish. Mike Lang is a professional photographer based in New York City. Mike Lang is the author of the book Build the Chicago dogs in the following ways: Place a grilled hot dog in a bun and close the bread. Yellow mustard, sweet pickle relish, 2 tomato wedges, onions, 1 dill pickle spear, and 2 sport peppers are spread on top of the sandwich. Because the celery salt is so potent, you only need a small sprinkle over the dog’s coat to finish it off. Assemble the remaining hot dogs in a single layer. Eat as soon as possible! Mike Lang is a professional photographer based in New York City. Mike Lang is a professional photographer based in New York City. Mike Lang is a professional photographer based in New York City. Mike Lang is the author of the book

The ChicagoDog – Hot Dog Chicago Style

To begin, let’s define what a Chicago-style hot dog is exactly. Before we get into detail about what a Chicago Dog is and what makes it so unique, let’s take a brief look at what a Hot Dog actually is. If you seek up the definition of “Hot Dog,” you will most likely come across the following information: hot dog or hotdogs (hot’dôg’, -dog’) are a kind of dog.

  1. To begin, let’s define what a Chicago-style hot dog is precisely. Before we get into detail about what a Chicago Dog is and what makes it so unique, let’s take a brief look at what a Hot Dog exactly is. Looking up the definition of “Hot Dog,” you will often find the following information: A hot dog (hot’dôg’, -dog’) is a kind of sausage.

A Canine with a Distinctive Character A Chicago Style Hot Dog is more than simply a hot dog; it’s a flavor sensation that includes the precise combination of toppings to make it unforgettable. So, what exactly is a Chicago Dog, and how do you get one? Steamed all-beef hot dogs with mustard, bright green relish, onions, tomato wedges, pickle spear or slice, sport peppers and a sprinkling of celery salt are served on a poppy seed bun, which is essential to the Chicago Style Hot Dog experience. The sequence in which the toppings are put to the Hot Dog is just as crucial as the selection of the toppings.

  1. One teaspoon of yellow mustard
  2. A bright “Neon” green relish
  3. Fresh chopped onions
  4. Two tomato wedges
  5. A pickle spear or slice
  6. Two sport peppers
  7. A pinch of celery salt (optional)
Remember:When adding toppings, dress the dog and not the bun!

What is the significance of the location of the toppings? If your Chicago Dog has been prepared properly, you will be able to taste the flavors of each component in each mouthful. A Chicago Style Hot Dog is never boiled, but rather slowly simmered over low steam heat until the hot dog reaches approximately 170-180 degrees, depending on the style. Although steam is the recommended way of cooking the Hot Dog, other methods such as grilling, boiling in water, or using a microwave are all acceptable options.

  1. These are the directions provided by Fluky’s (a Chicago institution since 1929) for heating your Hot Dogs: Bring the water to a boil, then reduce the heat until the water is no longer boiling, or a slight simmer.
  2. Pour enough water to cover the desired number of hot dogs and cook for 20 minutes, uncovered.
  3. Hot dog vendors in Chicago are proud to serve Vienna® Beef Hot Dogs, which account for more than 80% of their sales.
  4. The fact that not all establishments claiming to offer the Vienna brand genuinely do so is becoming increasingly evident to us.
  5. It does not follow that just because the sign reads “Vienna Beef,” that the restaurant continues to provide Vienna Beef items.
  6. There’s a new canine resident in town!
  7. Several places now serve their high-quality, great-tasting dogs, and the number of locations is rapidly expanding.

Their pure beef hot dogs are particularly engineered to be substantially leaner and to include significantly less added water than the standards utilized by other hot dog producers in their industry.

It has already been noted that the toppings are equally vital as the Hot Dog itself.

Ketchup is a condiment that Hot Dog connoisseurs despise for its acidity.

The use of ketchup on hot dogs is frequently passionately opposed by those who regard themselves to be Hot Dog aficionados; they believe the flavor of ketchup overpowers and ruins the taste of the Hot Dog, rather than complimenting and enhancing it.

When it comes to Chicago Style Hot Dogs, the use of ketchup is a contentious topic of discussion.

As a general rule, Chicago Hot Dog stands will not provide ketchup with a Chicago Dog.

“What do you think makes me feel ill to my stomach the most?

A Hot Dog with Ketchup?

“.

In its suggestions for appropriate Hot Dog and Sausage preparation, the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council When it comes to ketchup, the rules of etiquette are only slightly more accommodating, with the rule “Don’t use ketchup on your hot dog after the age of 18.” Acquire a working knowledge of the language ” The Works ” – When ordering a Chicago Style Hot Dog, it is crucial to understand the terms used to describe the hot dog.

  1. The terms “works” and “everything” are perhaps the two most crucial ones.
  2. If you order an all-beef Hot Dog on a steamed poppy seed bun, you are sending a clear message that you want it that way.
  3. Hot dog stands are typically quite busy and operate at a breakneck speed.
  4. Please let the person in front of you to make their order first, if you are not ready.
  5. The “snap” is the term used to describe the resistance.
  6. Next time you eat a Chicago Dog, make a point of taking a bite and remarking on the “snap.” This will wow your friends and family.
  7. This is something you would never say while placing an order.

This simple hot dog is made with natural casing all-beef and served on a steamed plain bun (no poppy seeds).

This is how Chicago Style hot dogs were first sold on the streets of Chicago during the Great Depression by street vendors.

Other components were introduced along the way, eventually resulting in the iconic Chicago Style hot dog that we know and love today.

Ambiance Don’t be overly concerned with the look of the establishment where you obtain your Dog.

The top hot dog places are generally considered “dives” by most people’s standards, yet they are some of the finest in the business.

In many cases, there is no place to sit, and in other others, the establishment is little more than an order counter with several bar stools to sit on (the round ones are my favorite).

Fries are the final component of the meal.

If they have excellent Dogs, they should also have excellent Italian Beefs on the menu.

In the hot dog industry, there is one thing that is certain: customer devotion to a certain brand.

If there are no signs on the exterior stating which Hot Dog brand is being served, there should be some indication on the inside of the establishment as well.

The Shopping Cart Experiece There’s nothing quite like grabbing your hot dog from a Hot Dog cart.

Even those who do not normally consume Hot Dogs are unable to resist the temptation to do so when they encounter a Hot Dog cart.

Take Pleasure in Your Dog The relish on a Chicago Style Dog is the most crucial component of the dish, second only to the dog itself.

The vibrant green relish on classic Chicago Dogs is a Chicago institution.

Although standard relish can be substituted, there is nothing that compares to the taste and appearance of the neon-green relish. Fluky’s, an original west side Hot Dog vendor, was the first to use the neon green relish, which was introduced in the early 1970s.

A Short History Of Chicago-Style Hot Dogs (And Why We Love Them So Much)

THE DOWNTOWN AREA — The city of Chicago has had a long-standing affection for its eponymous hot dog. The Chicago-style hot dog traditionally consists of a poppy seed bun filled with a wiener (Vienna Beef’s all-beef dogs are particularly popular, to put it mildly) and then topped with mustard, relish, onions, tomatoes, a pickle spear, sports peppers, and celery salt, to name a few of the traditional ingredients. The dish has been around for decades and has become as much of an icon of the city as The Bean or deep-dish pizza is to the United States.

‘Hot dogs were the staple diet of the working class prior to, through, and after the Great Depression,’ said Bill Savage, a hot dog historian and English professor at Northwestern University.

(At some establishments, such as FredJack’s in Chatham, you may still have lettuce on your dog.) Ultimately, the “Depression Sandwich” and other hot dogs were a great fit for the city of Chicago: In this working-class city, hot dog stalls might provide a cheap and quick dinner for those who were employed in factories or on road crews.

RELATED: The ownership of Chicago’s ten oldest hot dog stands has remained in the same families for decades.

According to Savage, “These are all things that working-class folks ate because they were excellent and pleasant and allowed them to stretch a dollar.” Chicago’s culture has evolved throughout time, and the city is no longer regarded as a working-class community but rather as a tourist attraction and “cultural machine,” according to Savage.

  1. “Right now, we’re producing sausage-related dialogue.” Nonetheless, the Chicago-style dog has maintained its popularity, in part due to the fact that people continue to speak about it, turning it into a symbol of the city, according to Savage.
  2. “It’s like breathing,” Savage explained.
  3. According to Savage, the hot dog has also retained its appeal because eating one is a shared custom among the city’s families.
  4. He claims that everyone has a favorite hot dog stand, and that the love of a fine Chicago dog is passed down through generations.
  5. You have the financial means to do so while you’re a teen or young adult.
  6. “And then it turns into a nostalgic experience.” The fact that this town has a large number of excellent hot dog stands is also a contributing factor.
  7. Here are some suggestions from Savage: Try to find an establishment that sells hot dogs just, without the addition of fries or a cup of soda.
  8. Keep an eye on how your Chicago-style dog is put together.

The following toppings should be added on a typical Chicago dog in the following order: mustard, relish, onions, tomatoes, pickle, sports peppers, celery salt.

5 Facts You Never Knew About Chicago Hot Dogs

Downtown is where the action is. A long-standing affection exists between Chicago and its iconic hot dog. The Chicago-style hot dog generally consists of a poppy seed bun filled with a wiener (Vienna Beef’s all-beef dogs are quite popular, to put it gently) and then topped with mustard, relish, onions, tomatoes, a pickle spear, sports peppers, and celery salt, to name a few of the fixings. The dish has been around for decades and has become as much of an icon of the city as The Bean or deep-dish pizza is to many people.

  1. When it came to working-class foods, “hot dogs were the food of choice,” according to Bill Savage, a hot dog historian and English professor at Northwestern University.
  2. Chicago-style dogs, on the other hand, were “truly a product of the Great Depression.
  3. For 5 cents, you could have a frankfurter topped with mustard, pickle relish, onions, and a dill pickle as well as lettuce and tomatoes.
  4. As it turned out, the “Depression Sandwich” and other hot dogs were an excellent fit for Chicago: As a working-class city, hot dog stalls might provide an inexpensive and convenient dinner for those who were employed in factories or on road crews.
  5. RELATED: Several generations of families have owned and operated Chicago’s ten oldest hot dog stands for years.

According to Savage, “These are all things that working-class folks ate because they were excellent and flavorful and could stretch a dollar.” According to Savage, Chicago’s culture has evolved with time, and the city is no longer considered a working-class city but rather a tourist attraction and “cultural factory.” In the past, Savage’s company made sausages.

Nonetheless, the Chicago-style dog has maintained its popularity, in part due to the fact that people continue to speak about it, turning it into a symbol of the city, according to Savage, ‘It’s all over the place.’ He described it as “like oxygen.” In Chicago, the hot dog is like the water – it’s always there, no matter what.

  • He claims that everyone has a favorite hot dog stand, and that the love of a fine Chicago dog is passed down from generation to generation throughout the city.
  • Teens and young adults can afford to do this since they have the financial means.
  • It then becomes a matter of nostalgia,” says the author.
  • Among Savage’s suggestions are the following: If you only want a hot dog, look for a hot dog stand that also serves fries and beverages.
  • Keep an eye out for how your Chicago-style dog is put together!

The following toppings should be added on a typical Chicago dog in the following order: mustard, relish, onions, tomatoes, pickle, sports peppers, celery salt and celery salt.

What’s a Chicago Dog, Anyway?

Beginning with a Vienna Beef or Red Hot dog that has been steamed in a S. Rosen’s poppy seed bun, the Chicago dog has become synonymous with the city. Afterwards, it’s “dragged through the garden” and topped with the following ingredients in the following order: yellow mustard, neon green pickle relish, sliced raw white onion, tomato wedges, pickle spear, sport peppers, and celery salt. Here are a few interesting facts about the Chicago hot dog, which is known as the “Wild Dog”:

1. Vienna Beef started with a hot dog cart.

When Samuel Landany and his brother-in-law Emil Reichel arrived in Chicago in 1890, they had already learnt to cook sausages while living in Austria. A cart at the entrance to the midway at the Chicago World’s Fair/Columbian Exhibition in 1893 was put up by the couple, who saw an opportunity and took advantage of it. The couple made enough money selling sausages to be able to build a shop. The Vienna Sausage Company officially opened its doors in 1894, only one year after the World’s Fair in Chicago.

2. There’s a reason Chicago hot dogs are all-beef.

Because Samuel Ladany and Emil Reichel were both Jews, their recipe contains just beef and no pork. As a result, Vienna Beef and its progeny, Red Hot, are the two most important providers of hot dogs in the Chicago metropolitan region. Our top hot dog choices are also made entirely of beef.

3. Chicago hot dogs are a treat for the tastebuds.

The toppings are said to have five distinct flavor profiles: salty, sweet, sour, bitter, and umami, which is a savory flavor profile. As a result, a Chicago hot dog checks off all of the boxes on your delicious checklist! Are you starting to feel hungry? Try some of these other delectable dishes from Illinois.

4. Just say no to one popular condiment.

Ketchup is the only condiment that is never used on a Chicago hot dog. Please do not inquire as to why. It’s just that it goes against the grain in the Second City. Here are some of the best hot dog toppings you’ve never tried before.

5. Hot dogs are big business.

It is estimated that there are more hot dog stalls in Chicago than McDonald’s, Burger King, and Wendy’s restaurants combined. In this city, it is fairly obvious that weiners (which are definitely not sandwiches) are the most popular fast food option for hungry residents. Learn about the most popular sandwich in your state, while we’re on the subject of sandwiches. 25 Creative Ways to Make Hot Dogs Even More Entertaining

Beefy Chili Dogs

People have been telling me for years that I make the finest hot dog chili they’ve ever had. It’s classic, it’s family-friendly, and I always have the recipe on hand since people often ask for it when I’m out. Vicki Boyd, from Mechanicsville, Virginia. Don’t have the time to make your own? These are the best hot dog joints in every state, according to our research.

Mexican Hot Dogs

The hot dogs with avocado and bacon that my stepmom introduced us to were inspired by her Mexican heritage. We were completely sucked in. They are now made by the entire family. Amanda Brandenburg lives in Hamilton, Ohio. These are the greatest regional hot dog styles from throughout the United States.

Corn Dog Twists

Making and eating these adorable variations on hot dogs and buns will be just as much fun for the kids as they will be for them!

Place bowls of relish, mustard, and ketchup on the table for some dunkable fun. — Melissa Tatum, of Greensboro, North Carolina, is a freelance writer.

Old-Fashioned Coney Hot Dog Sauce

Camping and hot dogs are inextricably linked. Raise some chicken breasts over an open fire and serve them with this delectable one-pot sauce. Lori Cargill Bustos of Phoenix, Arizona sent this in: Here are some more hot dog toppings to try if you haven’t already.

Chili Dog Baked Potatoes

These chili dogs are tucked between baked potatoes, making for a delightful and filling lunch or dinner. Even while they’re excellent for a summer BBQ, they’re also delicious any time of year! — Churdan, Iowa resident Anna Miller

Sweet Hoosier Dog Sauce

Sweet coney sauce over hot dogs is a favorite condiment in our part of Indiana! An historic drive-in restaurant in our town is still in operation, and it is famed for its sauce. —Jill Thomas from Washington, Indiana.

Chili Dog Pizza

When I prepare this mash-up pizza with hot dogs and chili, my daughters go crazy over it. It’s a fantastic way to make use of any leftover chili. Jennifer Stowell, of Smithville, Missouri, sent in this message.

Chicago-Style Hot Dogs

Hot dogs and chili are the perfect combination for this pizza, which my daughters adore. A fantastic way to use up leftover chili, this recipe is simple and delicious. —Jennifer Stowell from Smithville, Missouri.

Indiana-Style Corn Dogs

The corn dogs are one of the most enjoyable aspects of the various fairs and festivals held around Indiana. Corn dogs are a favorite of my family, therefore I prepare them on a regular basis at home. • Sally Denney from Warsaw, Indiana

Barbecued Party Starters

These sweet and zesty morsels will keep everyone satisfied until dinnertime. Set out some colorful toothpicks on the buffet table to make it easier for guests to nibble. • Anastasia Weiss from Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania

Corn Dog Casserole

All of your guests will be satisfied with these sweet and zesty morsels until supper! Set out some creative toothpicks on the buffet table to make it easier for guests to nibble. —Anastasia Weiss from Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania.

Cincinnati Chili Dogs

Due to the fact that my in-laws are from Ohio, Cincinnati chili is a staple at many of our family gatherings. The cinnamon and cocoa powder added a little zing to this family favorite, which I then served over hot dogs. It’s the perfect dish for game day, tailgating, and potluck gatherings. Brighton, Michigan resident Jennifer Gilbert contributed to this article.

Bandito Chili Dogs

These premium chili dogs are guaranteed to be a favorite at family gatherings and tailgates. The cheesy chili sauce is a hit with both adults and children, and the toppings are a lot of fun! — Marion Lowery, a resident of Medford, Oregon

Mini MacCheese Dogs

We wanted to try something different with hot dogs, so we came up with a mac-and-cheese version. Increase the amount of cheese, relish, and even bacon you use. —Julie Peterson from Crofton, Maryland

Dogs in a Sweater

Try these skewered hot dogs that have been wrapped in breadstick dough and baked for a unique take on an old classic recipe. Using ketchup, mustard, or ranch dressing on them is a lot of fun. The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council developed a recipe for a dressed-up dog that has been kid-tested. —Taste of Home Cooking Demonstration Kitchen

Hot Dog Sliders with Mango-Pineapple Salsa

We reduce down a variety of items for parties, like these fast hot dogs, to slider size, including the buns.

Add a generous amount of the simple yet enticing fruit salsa for a blast of vibrant flavor. •Carole Resnick from Cleveland, Ohio •

Pigs in a Poncho

We make slider-sized versions of a variety of meals for gatherings, including these fast hot dogs. Add a generous amount of the simple yet enticing fruit salsa for a blast of bright flavor. •Carole Resnick from Cleveland, Ohio.

Cheddar Corn Dog Muffins

I wanted to try something different with hot dogs, so I created corn dog muffins. I spiced up this kid-friendly recipe with jalapenos, and it was a hit with my husband as well. — Becky Tarala lives in Palm Coast, Florida, and she’s a writer.

Party Franks

These tiny, tangy appetizers are popular with people of all ages. I cook them on a regular basis for events such as holidays, weddings, and family reunions. Because the sauce can be made ahead of time and then reheated with the franks just before serving, they’re a convenient dish to serve at parties. Lucy Howell, of Portland, Oregon, contributed to this article.

BBQ Hot DogPotato Packs

There is a wide range of people who enjoy these little, acidic snacks. I create them on a regular basis for events such as Christmas parties, weddings, and family reunions, among other occasions. Because the sauce can be made ahead of time and then warmed with the franks just before serving, they’re a practical dish to serve during gatherings. —Lucille Howell, of Portland, Oregon, says

Hungarian Hot Dogs

Each city in the United States serves hot dogs topped with a unique combination of ingredients. Toledo is no exception to this rule. We came up with a variation of Tony Packo’s Hungarian hot dog, which is a popular street food in Toledo, Ohio, and is available nationwide. —Taste of Home Cooking Demonstration Kitchen

Hot Dog Sliders

Hot dogs, a traditional American dish, are transformed into a tasty treat that is perfect for a casual get-together. In this dish, they are given three distinct treatments: Chicago-style, Bavarian, and South of the Border. —Taste of Home Cooking Demonstration Kitchen

Sloppy Joe Dogs

There are a plethora of different ways to top a hot dog, but this delicious sloppy joe version is the best of the bunch. Kimberly Wallace of Dennison, Ohio, submitted this entry.

Hot Dog Roll-Ups

Not only do my grandchildren adore these cheese-filled hot dogs, but they also take pleasure in assisting in the preparation of the meal. It’s the ideal solution when you need to eat something quick and easy. —Lyletta Searle, from Morgan, Utah.

Chili Coney Dogs

From the youngest children to the most senior members of our family, these hot dogs are a family favorite. Inspired by the famous Coney dog, they are really simple to put together in the morning or even the night before a party. — Michele Harris of Vicksburg, Michigan, is a writer.

Bacon-Wrapped Hot Dogs

Everyone in our family enjoys these hot dogs, from the tiniest children to the oldest seniors. They’re based on the famous Coney dog, and they’re so simple to put together in the morning or even the evening before. — Michele Harris of Vicksburg, Michigan, is the author of this article.

Hot Dog Pie

Fortunately, a coworker who like hot dogs shared her recipe with me.

The pie, which is baked in a bought pastry shell, is simple to construct and can be on the table in less than 30 minutes. • Amy Bullis, from Henryville in Pennsylvania

Pigs in a Blanket

Hot dog sandwiches baked in the oven are a favorite among children of all ages. Including my husband, Allan, who admits to relishing each morsel. The ketchup and mustard are two of our favorite dipping sauces. — Linda Young of Longmont, Colorado, sent in this photo.

Chipotle Chili Dogs

It’s the end of childhood favorites! This dish was made to commemorate the 125th anniversary of a tiny town in the state of Minnesota. Because of the mild heat level, the tastes are enjoyed by individuals of all ages. Barb Templin of Norwood, Minnesota, contributed to this article.

Jersey-Style Hot Dogs

I grew up in northern New Jersey, the birthplace of the hot dog and grilled potato combination. This is a combination that you will enjoy. —Suzanne Banfield from Basking Ridge in New Jersey.

Rhode Island Hot Wieners

Wiener is spelled with a “ei” in several parts of Rhode Island, and it is often served “all the way” with meat sauce, mustard, onion, and a dusting of celery salt. — Karen Barros of Bristol, Rhode Island, is a writer.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *