What Does A Dog Ear Infection Look Like? (Perfect answer)

What does a dog ear infection look like?

  • Ear infections in dogs are common and most dogs suffer from this painful condition sometime in their life. Scratching and rubbing at the ear (s) and head shaking are common signs. You may also notice an abnormal odor from the ear or see redness or swelling.

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How do you know if your dog has an ear infection?

Symptoms of Dog Ear Infections

  1. Head shaking.
  2. Scratching at the affected ear.
  3. Dark discharge.
  4. Odor.
  5. Redness and swelling of the ear canal.
  6. Pain.
  7. Itchiness.
  8. Crusting or scabs in the ears.

How can I treat my dog’s ear infection without going to the vet?

Apple cider vinegar works by killing both yeast and bacteria. Use a mixture of 50% organic apple cider vinegar and 50% water, soak a cotton ball and clean your dog’s ears. If you notice your dog in pain or her ears drying out too much, discontinue use and see your vet.

Can dog Ear infections go away on their own?

In most cases, a dog’s ear infection will not go away on its own. What’s worse, if you wait too long to treat the ear infection, it can become much more difficult to get under control. An untreated ear infection can lead to chronic issues, hearing loss, and sometimes the need for expensive surgery.

How does ear infection look like?

The otoscope will allow the provider to look at the surface of the eardrum. A healthy eardrum looks pinkish-gray. An infection of the middle ear, or an ear with otitis media, looks red, bulging, and there may be clear, yellow, or even greenish hued drainage.

What is the brown stuff in my dog’s ears?

A waxy, yellow, or reddish-brown ear discharge can also be a sign your dog has an ear infection, which can be a result of allergies, mites, polyps, overproduction of ear wax, excessive bathing or swimming (which can leave too much moisture in the ears), or other problems.

What foods cause ear infections in dogs?

An excess of grain and/or sugar in the diet is a common causes of ear infections in dogs. Sugar feeds the yeast already in the body and causes an overgrowth, which results in the dark, yeasty-smelling buildup inside the ears.

Can you put peroxide in a dog’s ear for an ear infection?

A solution of one part hydrogen peroxide and one part water can be used to wipe out the canals of the ear with a cotton ball for a dog with a mild infection, post-veterinarian approval. Never use a q-tip or pointed object, as that can lead to damage in the ear.

Is apple cider vinegar good for dog ear infections?

Apple cider vinegar helps by acting as a cleanser and an anti-fungal and antibacterial agent. Dabbing this into your dog’s ears sparingly can help to clean out the inside of their ears and treat the infection.

Does vinegar cure dog ear infection?

But you don’t have to wait until medical attention is necessary. Apple cider vinegar is both harmless and helpful in preventing, and yes, even curing ear infections in dogs. Try to let it sit for as long as your dog will allow, scratching and rubbing the ear to help it get deep down into the ear canal.

What do vets give dogs for ear infections?

Antibiotics (such as amoxicillin-clavulanate, enrofloxacin, clindamycin, or cefpodoxime ) will be used for a bacterial infection for 6-8 weeks minimum. If the infection is fungal in nature, an anti-fungal medication (most often itraconazole) will be prescribed.

What happens to a dog with an untreated ear infection?

Ear infections are painful and can be detrimental to your dog’s health if left untreated. Deep ear infections can damage or rupture the eardrum, causing an internal ear infection and even permanent hearing loss. As soon as you see signs of an ear infection, it is essential that you see your veterinarian.

Will Benadryl help my dogs ear infection?

If just the outer area of the ear (not the deeper area) is a little red, they are likely suffering from an allergy that can be remedied with an antihistamine such as Benadryl (diphenhydramine) or Zyrtec (cetirizine).

Ear Infections In Dogs Otitis Externa

Otitis externa is a term used to describe an infection of the external ear canal (also known as an outer ear infection). It is one of the most common types of infections seen in dogs. Breeds that have big, floppy, or hairy ears, such as Cocker Spaniels, Miniature Poodles, or Old English Sheepdogs, tend to be more susceptible to ear infections than others, although ear infections can develop in any dog breed, regardless of its breed.

What are the symptoms of an ear infection?

Ear infections are extremely uncomfortable. Many dogs may shake their heads and scratch their ears in an attempt to alleviate the discomfort they are experiencing. Ears that are hot and irritated and have an awful odor are common symptoms of this condition. It is typical to have a black or yellowish discharge. Due to the persistent inflammation, the ears may seem crusty or swollen, and the ear canals may become constricted (stenotic) as a result of the condition.

Don’t these symptoms usually indicate ear mites?

Ear mites can produce a variety of symptoms, including a black discharge, itching, and shaking of the head, among others. Ear mite infections, on the other hand, are more common in puppies and kittens. It is possible for adult dogs to contract ear mites from infected puppies or cats on a rare occasion. It is often the case that the presence of ear mites creates an environment that facilitates the development of an illness caused by bacteria or yeast (fungus).

Since these symptoms are similar and usually mean an infection, why can’t I just get some ear medication?

There are numerous different types of bacteria, as well as at least one type of fungus, that are responsible for most ear infections. In order to choose which medicine to provide, it is necessary to identify the precise type of infection that has occurred. A foreign body, a polyp, or a tumor may be the source of the disease in some instances. The use of medication alone will not be sufficient to resolve these issues. It is critical that your dog’s eardrum be inspected to ensure that it is in good working order.

The only way to determine if this is the case is for your veterinarian to do an extensive ear examination.

How do you know which drug to use?

Before any other procedures are performed, an otoscope, a magnifying equipment with light, is used to inspect the ear canal. It is during this examination that your veterinarian can establish whether or not the eardrum is in good condition and whether or not there is any foreign material in the ear canal. Anesthesia or sedated anesthesia may be required for a thorough examination of a dog who is in severe pain and will not allow for the examination to take place. Under a microscope, a sample of the material from the ear canal will be examined in order to determine the type of organism that is causing the infection.

When your pet has a severe or chronic ear infection, culture and susceptibility tests are frequently performed to ensure that your pet is receiving the proper medication.

How are ear infections treated?

The results of the otoscopic and microscopic examinations are used to identify the diagnosis and course of treatment in the vast majority of cases. If there is a foreign substance, wax plug, or parasite stuck in the ear canal, it will be removed during your visit with us. Some dogs will need to be sedated for this, as well as to allow for a complete flushing and cleaning of the ears. Many dogs will be infected with more than one sort of illness at the same time (e.g., a bacterium and a fungus, or two kinds of bacteria).

“Allergies and poor thyroid function (hypothyroidism) are common in dogs that have chronic or recurring ear infections,” says the veterinarian.

Many dogs with chronic or recurrent ear infections have allergies or have low thyroid function, which can make the problem worse (hypothyroidism).

What is the prognosis?

Almost all ear infections, provided they are correctly detected and treated, may be managed effectively. The outcome, on the other hand, will be less favorable if the underlying reason is not recognized and addressed in due course. It is possible that several recheck tests may be required before a favorable outcome is achieved.

How important is it to treat an ear infection?

Dogs suffering from ear infections are in discomfort. Their ears are a constant source of discomfort, and they frequently scratch them and shake their heads in frustration. When this happens, it can result in a condition known as a “aural hematoma,” in which blood vessels in the ear flap burst and cause a painful swelling that requires surgical intervention to correct. Ear infections that are deep in the eardrum can cause damage or rupture, which can result in an internal ear infection and perhaps irreversible hearing loss.

My dog’s ear canal is nearly closed. Is that a problem?

Another complication of a chronic ear infection is the narrowing of the ear canal. This condition is referred to as hyperplasia or stenosis. If the ear canal is enlarged, drugs will have a tough time getting into the horizontal canal and will not work. In some dogs, anti-inflammatory medications can help to shrink the swollen tissues and allow the canal to open more easily. The majority of cases of hyperplasia will eventually necessitate surgical intervention.

What is the goal of ear canal surgery?

Treatment for this condition can be accomplished through a variety of surgical procedures. The alateral ear excision procedure is the most often done surgical procedure. Aims of the procedure include removal of the vertical portion of the ear canal as well as removal of swollen tissue from the horizontal portion of the canal. Removing tissue from the vertical canal is relatively straightforward; however, removing large amounts of tissue from the horizontal canal is more difficult.

Total ear canal ablation is a surgical procedure that is performed when it is necessary to remove the entire ear canal, which may result in a permanent loss of hearing. For more information on this procedure, please see the brochure “Total Ear Canal Ablation and Bulla Osteotomy (TECA-BO).”

Is there anything I need to know about administering medication in the ear?

“It’s critical to get the drug into the horizontal portion of the ear canal,” says the doctor. It is critical to provide the medicine through the horizontal portion of the ear canal (see above diagram). It is the dog’s external ear canal that is L-shaped, as opposed to our own. The vertical canal links the exterior of the ear to the inside of the ear and is the top portion of the letter ‘L.’ This canal is deeper in the canal than the vertical canal and finishes at the eardrum. To do this, the drug must be administered into the bottom portion of the letter “L” – the horizontal ear canal.

  1. Pulling the earflap straight up and slightly toward the rear with one hand and holding it in place is a good technique. Apply a tiny quantity of medicine into the vertical portion of the ear canal with the other hand while continuing to keep the earflap lifted. Hold the ear up for a long enough period of time to allow the medicine to flow down to the junction of the vertical and horizontal canals. Using your index and middle fingers, place one finger in front of and at the base of the earflap, and your thumb behind and at the base
  2. Between your index and middle fingers, massage the ear canal. Once the drug has entered the horizontal canal, a’squishing’ sound will indicate that it has done so. Allow your dog to shake its head after releasing the ear. Several medications will contain a wax solvent, and you may notice debris dissolved in the solvent leaving your dog’s ear as it shakes its head.

If a second drug is required, it should be administered in the same manner. Generally speaking, you should wait 5-30 minutes before putting any further drugs to your skin. To ensure that any ear medicine or cleansing agents are used properly, see your veterinarian for precise instructions. When cleaning the ear canal, avoid using cotton tipped applicators (Q-Tips) since they have a tendency to push dirt back into the vertical ear canal. When all meds have been applied, use a cotton ball soaked in some of the medication to wipe the outside section of the ear canal and the inside of the earflap after they have been applied.

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Dog Ear Infections: Symptoms, Causes, Treatment, and Prevention

  • Some studies have found that as many as 20% of dogs have some sort of ear illness. A dog’s ear canal is more susceptible to infection than a human’s because of the way their ears are shaped. Learn how to carefully clean your dog’s ears to keep them from becoming infected. The earliest possible visit to your veterinarian is recommended if your dog is exhibiting any of the common signs of an ear infection
  • Otherwise, the infection may spread.

Many dog owners have become familiar with the telltale signs of an ear infection in their dogs: whining, scratching, and head shaking are frequently the first signs of the problem. Ear infections are prevalent in dogs, especially those with floppy ears, such as Basset Hounds and Cocker Spaniels, and may be quite painful. An estimated 20 percent of dogs suffer from some sort of ear illness, which can affect either one or both ears at the same time. The good news is that there are activities you can do to lessen the length and severity of these crises in your dog’s health.

Otitis externa, media, and interna are the three forms of ear infections recognized by the medical community.

Acute middle ear infection and chronic inner ear infection are both terms used to refer to infections of the middle and inner ear canals, respectively.

Both otitis media and interna can be quite dangerous, resulting in hearing, facial paralysis, and vestibular indications among other symptoms.

Symptoms of Dog Ear Infections

Some dogs show no signs of ear infection other than a buildup of wax and discharge in the ear canal, which indicates that they have an infection.

However, ear infections frequently cause significant discomfort, and dogs suffering from them may exhibit symptoms such as:

  • Shaking of the head
  • Scratching of the afflicted ear
  • The following symptoms may be present: dark discharge
  • Odor
  • Redness and swelling of the ear canal
  • Pain
  • Itching
  • Crusting or scabs in the ears

What Causes Ear Infections in Dogs?

It is more vertical in shape than the human ear canal, generating an L-shape that is more effective at keeping fluids inside the ear canal. As a result, dogs are more susceptible to ear infections. Ear infections are most commonly caused by bacteria, yeast, or a mix of the two types of bacteria. Ear mites can potentially be a cause of illness in pups, according to the ASPCA. Ear infections in your dog can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

  • Moisture, which can provide an ideal environment for the growth of bacteria and yeast
  • Allergies, which are responsible for ear illness in around 50% of dogs with allergic skin disease and in approximately 80% of dogs with food sensitivity
  • Thyroid illness and other endocrine problems are examples of this. Autoimmune disorders are a group of diseases that affect the immune system. Excessive buildup of wax
  • Foreign objects
  • Excessive cleansing of the ear canal
  • Ear canal injury

Precise Diagnosis Needed for a Dog’s Ear Infections

As soon as your dog exhibits any of the frequent indications of an ear infection, it is critical that you take him to the veterinarian. Not only is prompt treatment vital for your dog’s comfort (these disorders may be really painful! ), but it is also necessary to prevent the infection from spreading to the middle and inner ear. Home treatment for ear infections is not recommended. Prepare to offer your veterinarian with a detailed history of the condition at hand. This is particularly crucial if you are experiencing a first-time infection or if you are seeing a new veterinarian.

  • The length of time that any symptoms, such as discomfort, swelling, discharge, and odor, persist
  • If your dog suffers from allergies or any other underlying medical concerns, please let us know. If your dog is on medicine, please let us know. It is important to know what your dog has been consuming. How often you clean your dog’s ears and the products you use are important considerations. In the event that you have clipped or plucked the hair off your dog’s ears
  • Bathing, grooming, or swimming are examples of recent activities. Please tell us whether your dog has ever had an ear infection and if so, when it happened and how it was treated.

A physical examination will be performed by your veterinarian once he or she has obtained a history of your dog’s health. In severe cases, your veterinarian may also recommend that you sedate your dog in order to allow for a more thorough examination deep within the ear canal. Your veterinarian will examine both of your ears, and the examination may involve the following procedures:

  • Look for signs such as redness, swelling, and discharge using your visual assessment skills. Examination of the ear canal and eardrum with an otoscope, which allows for more detailed examination. A gentle touch of the ear to determine the amount of discomfort
  • Examination under a microscope of samples obtained by swabbing the ear
  • Ear samples are cultured in the laboratory. Patients with severe or chronic conditions may require biopsy or X-rays.

How are Dog Ear Infections Treated?

Your veterinarian will carefully clean your dog’s ears using an ear cleaner that has been specially formulated for dogs. In addition, your veterinarian may recommend that you apply an ear cleaning and a topical treatment at home. Veterinarians may give oral antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs in severe instances. Once adequate treatment is initiated, the majority of simple ear infections cure within 1–2 weeks. Severe infections or those caused by underlying conditions, on the other hand, may take months to resolve or even develop into chronic problems.

A Total Ear Canal Ablation is one example of such surgery (TECA).

It is critical that you follow your veterinarian’s directions to the letter and that you return to the veterinary hospital for any suggested review appointments as scheduled.

When dealing with a sick dog, it is especially critical that you complete the entire course of medication, even if your dog appears to be getting better.

Can You Prevent Ear Infections in Dogs?

Preventative measures are always preferable in the case of most diseases. It is important to completely dry your dog’s ears after swimming or bathing since excessive moisture is a major cause of ear infections in dogs. Identification and management of any underlying reasons, such as allergies, in a dog that is prone to chronic or recurring ear infections, can assist to prevent new infections from forming. In addition to preventing ear infections, cleaning your dog’s ears at home can help prevent them.

  1. Jeff Grognet recommends the following techniques for cleaning your dog’s ear: In the first instance, fill the canal with a dog ear cleaning solution and massage the vertical ear canal from the outside.
  2. It is best not to use paper towels or cotton since they may leave fibers behind that might cause discomfort.
  3. However, avoid using them in the ear canal, as this may inadvertently push debris deeper into the canal.
  4. Seek therapy as soon as your dog displays indications of an ear infection to prevent the condition from becoming more serious and requiring veterinary attention.

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How to Spot an Ear Infection In Your Dog

Did you know that certain breeds of dogs are more susceptible to ear infections than other breeds? Yes, it is correct. Dogs with floppy ears, such as Cocker Spaniels, Basset Hounds, and other long-eared breeds, are more prone to ear infections than dogs with upright ears, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association. Dogs that spend a lot of time in the water feel the same way. According to both cases, they have an excessive amount of moisture trapped in their ears, which allows bacteria to form and grow in their ears.

Discover the three types of ear infections that dogs can develop, the most prevalent causes of these infections, and the signs to look out for so you can know when to call your veterinarian for an appointment.

What Are the Three Types of Canine Ear Infections?

According to the American Kennel Club, “There are three types of ear infections in dogs: otitis externa, otitis media, and otitis interna, which affect various areas of the canine ear.” An otitis externa is an inflammation of the layer of cells lining the exterior or external section of the ear canal, which is the most common kind. When we talk about ear infections, we’re referring to infections of the middle and inner ear canals. These infections are most typically caused by a spread of infection from the external ear.

That is why it is critical to prevent ear problems and to seek treatment as soon as they occur.” Aside from the potential danger, you want your dog to be more comfortable!

Now that you’re aware that there are several distinct types of ear infections, and that they’re typically (but not always) caused by bacteria, let’s go over the specifics.

What Causes Canine Ear Infections?

As previously stated, dogs with long ears that cover their ear canals, such as Cocker Spaniels and Basset Hounds, are among those who are more susceptible to ear infections. Those droopy ears are adorable, but they have a drawback: the hair that lines the inside of those ears can trap moisture and debris inside the ear. Furthermore, because the ears are drooping, there is little possibility for them to “air out,” which is important because germs can build in the ear if it is not allowed to dry out.

When it comes to these situations, keeping the hair around your dog’s ears clipped might be beneficial.

“Bacteria are the primary disease-causing agents that cause infection and subsequent inflammation of the middle or inner ear in dogs,” according to the American Veterinary Medical Association.

“As you can see, there are a variety of other reasons why an ear infection would not be caused by bacteria, including trauma to the body such as a car accident, the presence of tumors or polyps in the ear, and the presence of foreign objects in the ear.” Your veterinarian will be able to evaluate and diagnose your dog in order to determine the cause and recommend a treatment.

Typical Dog Ear Infection Symptoms

As previously stated, dogs with long ears that cover their ear canals, such as Cocker Spaniels and Basset Hounds, are among those who are more prone to ear infections. Those droopy ears are adorable, but they have a drawback: the hair that lines the inside of the ears can trap moisture and debris inside the ear canal. Because the ears are drooping, there is little possibility for them to “air out,” which is important because germs can grow if the ear is not allowed to dry out. That moisture risk extends to the swimming dog population, which means that if you have a swimmer, you are undoubtedly familiar with the symptoms of an ear infection.

“Bacteria are the primary disease-causing agents that cause infection and subsequent inflammation of the middle or inner ear in dogs,” according to the American Veterinary Medical Association.

  • An ear scratching or scratching of the skin around the ear discharge that is brown, yellow, or bloody
  • A foul odor in the ear Redness Swelling Crusts or scabs on the interior of the outer ear’s inner surface
  • Hair loss in the area around the ear Scratching one’s ear and surrounding region against the floor or furniture
  • Unusual eye movements
  • Head shaking or tilting
  • Loss of equilibrium
  • Unsteadiness Circumnavigating in circles
  • Hearing impairment

According to the chart above, some of these symptoms appear to be more obvious than others. If your dog is pawing at his ears or shaking his head more than normal, take a quick look inside his ear to see what’s wrong. Is there a foul odor in the room? Is it a bright red color? Regardless of the situation, you should bring your dog in for an assessment. Ear infections can manifest themselves quickly as well, so don’t assume they will take days to manifest themselves. A few hours can make a world of difference between your dog being healthy and suffering from a painful ear infection.

How to Spot a Yeast Infection in Dog’s Ear

Dogs can suffer from yeast ear infections, which can be particularly problematic during the hot and humid summer months. Our Moorseville veterinarians go through the fundamentals of yeast ear infections in dogs, including the origins, symptoms, and treatment and prevention options available for this condition.

Yeast Ear Infections

Yeast is a naturally occurring fungus that can be found on the skin and in the ears of your dog. When the proper balance of yeast is maintained, your pet’s skin and ears will remain healthy. However, inflammation of the ear can cause yeast levels to rise and develop, resulting in a dark, greasy discharge within the ear canal and around the inner flap of your pup’s ear. If your dog has a yeast infection, consult your veterinarian. This discharge can be itchy and smelly for your pup, and it can also be contagious.

Weather that is hot and humid creates an ideal setting for the growth of yeast. Yeast infections are frequently caused by a combination of moisture and heat, as well as a lack of airflow caused by the shape of your dog’s ears.

Causes of Yeast Ear Infection in Dogs

Many factors can cause the delicate environment within your pup’s ear to become disrupted, and this can result in a yeast infection. Some of the most prevalent are as follows:

  • Moisture trapped in the ears, especially in dogs with longer floppy ears
  • Antibiotics
  • Immunodeficiency
  • Excessive washing
  • Yeast allergy
  • Frequent swimming
  • Exercise in humid settings Feeding your dog high-calorie treats
  • Not washing your dog’s ears on a consistent basis

Signs That Your Dog May Have A Yeast Ear Infection

Your dog may be experiencing one or more of the following symptoms if he or she has a yeast ear infection:

  • A waxy discharge in the ear that is red or brown
  • Scratching and pawing at the ear
  • Itching and scratching A cheesy or musty odor emanating from the ear canal
  • Ear that is red or itchy

How to Get Rid Of a Yeast Infection in Dog’s Ear

Ear infections in dogs are uncomfortably itchy and uncomfortable, and if left untreated, they can become painful if the infection progresses and becomes more serious. If you suspect that your dog may be suffering from a yeast infection in one or both ears, it’s time to take him to the veterinarian. Your veterinarian will be able to establish the source of your pup’s ear infection and prescribe the most appropriate medication. It is probable that your dog’s ears will be cleaned by the veterinarian at your dog’s appointment to ensure that treatment gets started on the proper foot.

  • At-home cleaning of your dog’s ears using a medicated cleaner on a regular basis
  • Topical medicines, oral antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and other medications

Preventing Ear Infections in Dogs

Dogs’ ears should be kept healthy and dry if they are to avoid getting yeast ear infections in the future. Ensure that your dog’s ears are completely dry after swimming or bathing, especially if your doggie has been in water. Chronic or recurrent infections in your dog might be caused by underlying disorders such as allergies or hypothyroidism in certain cases. It is critical to address the underlying cause of your pup’s ear infections as soon as possible. Please keep in mind that the information contained in this page is meant solely for educational reasons and does not represent medical advice for dogs.

Is your dog exhibiting signs of a yeast ear infection?Contact our Mooresville vetstoday to book an examination for your dog. Our vets can diagnose the cause of your dog’s ear issues and provide effective treatments to restore your dog’s ears to good health.

We’re constantly welcoming new patients, so please contact our veterinary facility immediately to schedule your pet’s first appointment. We look forward to hearing from you. Get in Touch With Us

Signs Your Dog Has an Ear Infection (and How to Get Rid of It)

Dogs are prone to ear infections, which are rather frequent. Make sure you understand how to recognize when your dog is suffering from one so that you can get them feeling well as soon as possible. As a dog owner, it’s a good idea to get aware with the indications of canine ear infections so that you can recognize them when they occur. According to the American Kennel Club, it’s a common ailment that affects up to one in every five dogs. If left untreated, it can result in scarring that narrows the ear canal and causes hearing loss.

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Although these infections are difficult to treat, the good news is that they are often avoidable and, in many cases, preventative.

What Causes Ear Infections in Dogs?

In dogs, “ear infections arise when the skin surface becomes unhealthy,” explains Emily Pashaian-Grant, DVM, medical director of the VCA Sylvania Vet Animal Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

“The most effective method of preventing ear infections is to identify the underlying cause of the illness. You will be able to avoid or address whatever is causing the problem in this manner.”

YeastBacteria

VCA Sylvania Vet Animal Hospital’s medical director, Emily Pashaian-Grant, DVM explains that ear infections in dogs occur when the skin surface gets inflamed. “In order to avoid ear infections in the future, it is necessary to determine the source of the problem. You’ll be able to prevent or address whatever it is that’s causing the issue this way.”

Ear Mites

Ear mites are minute parasites that can infest your dog’s ears. They are contagious and can be difficult to detect. They may be passed from animal to animal, or your dog might take them up by just laying down on the grass outside. They don’t bite, but their presence irritates the skin of your dog’s ears, causing them to itch like crazy and scratching themselves. Ear mites in dogs can cause ear infections as a result of the inflammation they generate on the skin.

Moist Ears

According to Grant, bacteria and yeast thrive in wet, dark environments. Hounds and spaniels are examples of canines with floppy ears who are more prone to developing ear infections than other dogs. Air can readily enter and keep the ears dry while they are held upright. Ears that fold down, on the other hand, collect moisture, which promotes germs to multiply. Additionally, puppies in a litter might get ear infections as a result of licking and pulling on each other’s ears, according to Grant.

Allergies

When it comes to recurrent ear infections, allergies are frequently the root cause. Grant advises that if your dog has multiple ear infections, it may be time to pursue allergist testing. According to the American Kennel Club, ear infections occur in 80 percent of dogs with food allergies and 50 percent of dogs with environmental allergies, respectively.

Dog Ear Infection Symptoms

Puppies suffer from ear infections that are quite unpleasant. Consequently, you’ll most likely see your dog scratching his ears or shakily tossing his head. Other signs and symptoms include red, inflamed skin within the ears, as well as brown, yellow, or green drainage from the ear canal. Ear infections can sometimes be quite unpleasant to deal with.

How to Treat a Dog Ear Infection

If it comes to the stage of infection, “typically, you’ll require prescription medicine,” Grant explains. Seeing your veterinarian as soon as you see symptoms is recommended because ear infections do not heal on their own and must be treated immediately. In order to determine if the discharge is caused by mites, yeast, or bacteria, your veterinarian will collect a sample of the discharge and examine it under a microscope. If it is, your veterinarian will prescribe the necessary treatment. Antibiotics, antifungals, and anti-mite drugs are some of the treatments that are often given topically to the skin.

While they are lying down, a woman places eardrops in the blond terrier mix’s ear.

“If it turns out to be a one-time ear infection, we won’t do anything more.

However, if your dog has numerous ear infections, we will discuss allergy testing so that we can develop a more effective long-term strategy for your pet’s treatment. It may be necessary to modify food intake or use long-term medication to resolve canine allergies.”

Home Remedy to Prevent Infections

Maintaining the cleanliness and dryness of your dog’s ears is the most critical thing you can do at home to avoid ear infections. Grant suggests cleaning your dog’s ears at least once a month to keep them in good condition. You may either purchase a dog ear wash from the market or manufacture your own cleaning solution at home by mixing half water and half hydrogen peroxide together. Is it tough to persuade your dog to stay still for an extended period of time? These recommendations, which have been recommended by a veterinarian, will make the ear-cleaning process easier.

Treating the underlying cause of your dog’s ear infections is a long-term treatment that will result in a happier and healthier life for your dog.

What are the signs of ear infections in dogs?

The most essential thing you can do at home to avoid ear infections in your dog is to keep his ears clean and dry. Keeping your dog’s ears clean is recommended at least once a month, according to Grant. A dog ear wash can be purchased at a local pet store, or you can prepare your own cleaning solution at home by mixing half water and half hydrogen peroxide together. Is it seems like it will be tough to persuade your dog to sit still? Cleaning your dog’s ears can be much easier if you follow these advice from a veterinarian.

A long-term cure to your dog’s ear infections is to address the underlying causes, which results in a happier and healthier life for your dog.

Causes of Ear Infections in Dogs

Preventing ear infections in your dog begins with keeping his ears clean and dry at all times. Grant suggests cleaning your dog’s ears at least once a month to keep them in good shape. You may either purchase a dog ear wash from the market or manufacture your own cleaning solution at home by mixing half water and half hydrogen peroxide. Do you believe it will be tough to convince your dog to sit still? These recommendations, which have been recommended by a veterinarian, will make the ear cleaning process easier.

Treating the underlying cause of your dog’s ear infections is a long-term treatment that will result in a happier, healthier life for your dog.

Types of Dog Ear Infections

There are three different forms of ear infections that may occur in dogs:

  • Otitis externa infections occur on the exterior of the ear
  • They are caused by bacteria. Otitis medium is a term used to describe an infection in the middle ear of a dog. There are several types of otitis interna, which are infections of your pet’s inner ear.

Symptoms of Ear Infections in Dogs

If your dog has gotten an ear infection, he or she is likely to be quite uncomfortable, and the ear may be really painful in some situations. If your dog exhibits any of the indications of an ear infection listed below, call your veterinarian immediately to schedule an appointment for your pet to be examined.

Early detection and treatment of ear infections can assist to avoid the development of more serious symptoms. The following are some of the most common indications of canine ear infections:

  • The act of scratching or pawing at one’s ear Redness inside the ear
  • An odor emanating from the ear
  • Yellow, brown, or bloody discharge
  • Shaking or tilting of the head
  • Swelling of the ear
  • Crusts or scabs on the interior of the ear canal. Rubbing one’s ear on the floor or furniture

If your dog has a more serious ear infection, you may notice other signs and symptoms such as the ones listed below:

  • Inability to maintain balance or coordination
  • Signs of hearing impairment

Treating Your Dog’s Ear Infection

A veterinarian will examine and clean your dog’s ears with a medicated cleanser before prescribing any antibiotics or anti-inflammatory medication that will be effective in treating your dog’s ear infection. If your dog has an ear infection, the veterinarian will take the time to clean your dog’s ears with a medicated cleanser. A topical medicine may also be prescribed by the veterinarian, who will teach you on how and when to apply it to your dog’s ear at home. Uncomplicated canine ear infections usually resolve up within a week or two if identified early and treated properly, according to the manufacturer.

In many situations, more severe cases result in chronic or recurrent ear infections that last throughout the dog’s whole life.

Failure to complete prescriptions or discontinuing treatment before the illness has entirely resolved might result in a reoccurring infection that gets progressively difficult to manage.

However, even if it appears that the illness has been eradicated, there may still be residues of infection that are difficult for pet owners to detect.

Preventing Ear Infections in Dogs

Our veterinarians feel that preventing illness is always preferable to treating it. Cleaning and drying your dog’s ears regularly will help to reduce the likelihood of your dog having an ear infection in the first place. Inquire with your veterinarian about the most effective cleaning solution to use on your dog’s ears, and set aside time each week to carefully clean your pup’s ears. Please keep in mind that the information contained in this page is meant solely for educational reasons and does not represent medical advice for dogs.

Is your pup showing signs of a painful ear infection?Contact Thomasville Veterinary Hospital Urgent Care + Surgeryfor urgent vet care for your pup. Our Davidson County emergency vets are here to help your dog whenever your regular vet is unavailable.

A dog ear infection is a common problem that veterinarians see on a daily basis in their canine patients. Bacteria, fungi, and parasites can all cause these illnesses, and in certain cases, a foreign material such as foxtail can also be the source of the infection.

Let’s Talk About the Anatomy of a Dog’s Ear

The ear of a dog may be split into four separate sections:

  • Pinna (also known as auricle or ear flap)
  • The external ear canal, the middle ear, and the internal ear are all defined as follows:

For the purpose of directing the mobility of the ear, there are more than a dozen muscles involved. The ears are extremely densely packed with blood vessels and nerves, which are all extremely sensitive.

A blood vessel can be damaged as a result of persistent scratching or head shaking, which can result in the ear flap being swollen and filled with blood in many cases. This is a medical problem that requires surgical intervention.

What You Need To Know About Dog Ear Infections

When a dog is suffering from an ear infection, it is extremely obvious. Ear infections in dogs are classified as otitis externa, otitis media, and otitis interna, with each form affecting a distinct part of the ear canal. In some cases, infections in the dog’s ear might spread to numerous areas of the ear. When it comes to ear infections, otitis externa refers to infections of the outer ear, whereas otitis media and interna are diseases of the middle and inner ear that are most often caused by an untreated infection of the outer ear that spreads.

Symptoms of Dog Ear Infections

In most cases, the signs of a dog ear infection are extremely visible, and they include head shaking and scratching, foul odor, head tilting, scaling of the skin, redness, and swelling, as well as a black smelly discharge, among other things. Bacteria, yeast, viruses, ear mites, allergies, foreign bodies, hormonal imbalance, autoimmune illnesses (such as Pemphigus), trauma, meningitis, encephalitis, and other diseases are the most prevalent causes of dog ear infections, but there are others as well.

However, antibiotics or antimycotic drops can be used to treat some ear infections, which are serious enough to need the use of systemic drugs.

Common Reasons for Dog Ear Infections

Ear infections in dogs may appear as a bacterial infection in one ear and a yeast infection in the other, depending on the severity of the illness. Because an ear infection can be caused by either yeast or bacteria, it is important to be cautious. The first step is to determine what is causing the pain in your dog’s ears and then treat it appropriately. This article will assist you in determining the sort of ear infection your dog is suffering from, as well as provide you with some home remedies for treating it.

Ear infections can be caused by a variety of different factors.

  • Depending on the severity of the ear infection, one ear may be affected by bacteria while the other is affected by yeast infection. Because an ear infection can be caused by either yeast or bacteria, it is important to get medical attention immediately. Discovering the source of your dog’s ear ache and administering appropriate treatment are your first steps. With the aid of this article, you can determine what sort of ear infection your dog is experiencing and how to treat it yourself. It is important to examine your dog’s ears on a regular basis in order to detect and treat an infection before it becomes too late for him. It is possible to have ear infections from a variety of sources. Ear infections in dogs can be caused by several factors, some of which are as follows:

Although bacterial diseases are typically associated with a foul odor, this is not always the case. Similarly, yeast infections can develop a foul odor that becomes unbearable.

Avoid The Following Hygiene Mistakes:

Not cleaning your dog’s ears correctly, especially if they become unclean; wearing dog earrings (which can become blocked); and not brushing your dog’s teeth. Not taking frequent trips to the veterinarian. Your veterinarian’s ears should be examined every six months, and they will provide you with information on how to care for your veterinarian’s ears. Dirty or odorous conditions can make it easier for germs to colonize and transform a simple infection into a serious infection. There are various distinct forms of ear infections depicted in the following video.

This project is committed to provide support and assistance in the advancement of veterinary medicine. In the veterinary community, it is important to share knowledge and spark debate.

Ear Infections in Dogs

Ear infections in dogs are something that our Apple Valley veterinarians see on a regular basis. Most canine ear infections are rather simple to cure if they are discovered early on. Here are a few indicators that your dog may be suffering from an ear infection, as well as what you should do if you suspect your dog is suffering from one.

Your Pup’s Ears

In addition, because the shape of a dog’s ear canals can be more susceptible to ear infections than that of humans, if your pup spends a lot of time in water or has floppy ears, these health problems may become more frequent and difficult to treat. Water may become trapped in your dog’s ears, creating an excellent setting for the development of bacterial ear infections in him. With a little additional attention to your dog’s ears, you may help to prevent him from acquiring an ear infection. And if your pup does acquire an infection, getting him to the vet as soon as possible will increase the likelihood that it will be cleaned up quickly and easily, saving you time and money.

Causes of Dog Ear Infections

Otitis media (infected ears) in dogs are most commonly caused by bacteria; but, other organisms such as yeast, fungus, and ear mites can also cause your dog’s ears to become horribly infected. Other potential causes of ear infections in your pup include foreign items being trapped in their ear canal, physical trauma, and polyps in the ear canal. In dogs, depending on where the infection has developed, there are three different forms of ear infections that can occur:

  • Otitis interna are infections of your pet’s inner ear that can be treated with antibiotics. a dog with an inner ear infection
  • Otitis medium is a term used to describe an infection in the middle ear of a dog. (Infection of the middle ear in dogs)
  • Otitis externa infections are ear infections that occur outside of the ear canal. (Infection of the outer ear in dogs)

Signs of Ear Infection in Dogs

Your dog’s ear infection might be quite uncomfortable for him. If your dog is exhibiting any of the indications of an ear infection listed below, contact your veterinarian immediately to schedule an appointment for your pet. Early treatment of ear infections can assist to avoid more severe symptoms from developing over time, as well as lower the likelihood of problems emerging later in the infection. In the event that your dog has an ear infection, you may notice one or more of the following symptoms:

  • Tilting of the head
  • Odor in the ear
  • Pawing or scratching at the ear
  • And other symptoms. Discharge that is brown, yellow, or crimson
  • Redness and swelling inside the ear
  • A ringing in the ear
  • Shaking of the head
  • Crusts or scabs on the interior of the ear canal.
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If your dog has a serious ear infection, you may notice other signs and symptoms such as the ones listed below.

Treatment for Ear Infections in Dogs

We will spend time cleaning out your dog’s ears with a medical cleaner and prescribing antibiotics or anti-inflammatory meds that will be suited for treating the type of ear infection that your pup has if it is identified with an ear infection by our veterinarians. In addition, your pet may be prescribed a topical treatment, with instructions on how to apply it to your pup’s ears at home, if this is the case. When treated early on, a simple ear infection will normally clear up within a week or two after being diagnosed.

Dogs can get chronic ear infections or recurrent ear infections throughout the course of their lives if they have a severe case of ear infection.

Failure to complete your pup’s prescription or discontinuing treatment before the infection has been completely treated might result in reoccurring illnesses that will become increasingly difficult to treat in the future.

If the illness appears to have cured, there may still be some signs of infection that are difficult to detect by the owner. Finishing therapy before the infection has completely healed might result in recurrent symptoms that are difficult to treat and control.

How to Prevent Your Dog From Getting an Ear Infection

Once an ear infection has been discovered in your dog’s ears, our veterinarians will take the time to thoroughly clean out your dog’s ears with a medical cleaner and prescribe antibiotics or anti-inflammatory meds that are appropriate for treating the type of ear infection your pup has. In addition, your pet may be prescribed a topical treatment, with instructions on how to apply it to your pup’s ears at home, if this is the situation. When treated early on, a simple ear infection will normally clear up within a week or two after being apparent.

Dogs can get chronic ear infections or recurrent ear infections throughout the course of their lives if they have a severe case of ear infections.

Failure to complete your pup’s medication or discontinuing treatment before the infection has been completely cured might result in recurrent infections that will become increasingly difficult to treat as time goes on.

While it may appear that the illness has been resolved, there may still be signs of infection that are difficult for owners to detect.

If your dog is suffering from an ear infection, it’s time to head to your vet.ContactApple Valley Animal Hospitaltodayto book an examination with our experienced vets and get appropriate treatment for your pooch’s condition.

It is possible that dogs are more susceptible to developing ear infections than humans for a variety of reasons. The shape of the ear canal, hair in the ear canals, allergies, wax build-up, and moisture in the ears are all variables that might be responsible for the condition. Learn more about ear infections (also known as otitis) in dogs, including the signs and symptoms to look for as well as diagnostic testing, treatments, and preventative care.

Otitis Externa: The Most Common Type of Ear Infection in Dogs

The focus of this page is on otitis externa, which refers to ear infections that occur in the ear canals rather than the middle or inner ear (the parts behind theeardrum). When compared to humans, dogs have a significantly longer ear canal. An “L” or “J” shape is formed as a result of the ear canal’s descent and subsequent movement inward toward the skull. This increases the amount of surface area available for wax accumulation, moisture accumulation, and the development of infection. It is possible that foreign material, such as plant debris or insects, has been lodged deep within the ear canal.

Additionally, ear mites can infect the ear canals and burrow into the skin, resulting in bleeding and discomfort.

Normally, the ears of a healthy dog do not have an abnormal amount of ear wax or debris in them.

A microbial population overgrows in the ear canals when the state of the ear canals is disturbed, which results in an infection.

The ear canal of a dog is split into three sections: the outer/external ear, the middle ear, and the inner ear. There are three different forms of ear infections in dogs, each of which is categorised according to where the infection is located.

  • It is important to distinguish between otitis externa, which is inflammation of the outer ear canal, and otitis media, which is inflammation of the middle ear canal, which is inflammation of the inner ear.

Otitis externa is the most frequent of the three forms of ear infections in dogs, and it occurs in the region of the ear that is most exposed to the outside world. During the inflammation process, the infected ear becomes painful, crimson, and begins to emit an awful odor. There may be a discharge from the ears that is black or yellowish in color. Because of these changes, cerumen (wax) production along the external ear canal often increases, which leads to a rise in the local humidity and pH of the external ear canal, predisposing the ear to secondary infection.

  • There is a possibility that this is an indication of a more serious illness that has impacted the nerve system.
  • Ear infections can be either acute (with a rapid start) or chronic (with recurrence).
  • A chronic ear infection is characterized by the growth of crusts in the ear canals or the thickening of the ear canal walls.
  • Your veterinarian may propose surgery if anti-inflammatory drugs are ineffective at alleviating swelling of the ear tissues.

Are certain breeds prone to ear infections?

A few of dog breeds are more susceptible to acquiring ear infections than others. Certain traits of these dogs, such as the shape of their ears or the conformation of their ears, are common among them. Genetics has also been demonstrated to be a significant predisposing factor in the development of various canine diseases.

Long, Floppy Ears

Dog breeds with long and floppy ears are more prone to persistent ear infections than other breeds. These dogs may also have a greater number of glands that create earwax (ceruminous glands) than other breeds, which may be more than other breeds. Breeds such as Cocker Spaniels, Beagles, Basset Hounds, and Setters are just a few examples of those who exhibit these qualities.

Small Ear Canals

Some of the dog breeds having tiny ear canals are bulldogs, Chow Chows, and Chinese Shar-Peis, to name a few examples. This physical characteristic makes them more susceptible to ear irritation and infection.

Dog Breeds Prone to Allergies

Dogs of all kinds can be affected by allergies, but Labrador retrievers, Golden retrievers, Boston terriers, and Shih Tzus are just a few of the breeds that are more prone to allergies and sensitivities, which can lead to chronic or recurring ear infections in their owners.

Breeds with Excess Hair in the Ear Canals

Some breeds of dogs, such as the Bichon Frise, Shih Tzu, and Poodle, have excessive hair in their ear canals, which can provide a suitable environment for yeast and bacteria to flourish in their ears. Extra hair can obstruct appropriate airflow, which is necessary to keep the ear canal dry, as well as trap dirt, debris, and excess ear wax. Excess hair can also irritate the ear canal.

Causes of Ear Infections in Dogs

Some breeds of dogs, such as the Bichon Frise, Shih Tzu, and Poodle, have excessive hair in their ear canals, which can provide a suitable environment for yeast and bacteria to flourish in their ear.

Hair growth in the ear canal can obstruct adequate airflow, which is necessary for keeping the ear canal dry, and it can also collect dirt, debris, and excess, obstructing the passage of ear wax.

  • Water in the ear canals due to bathing or swimming in excessive amounts
  • The presence of foreign substances in the dog’s ear, such as foxtails or grass awn, is a cause of hearing loss. Mites in the ears
  • Allergic reactions to allergens found in pet food or the environment. Polyps are abnormal growths that develop in the ear canal. Hormonal disorders such as hypothyroidism
  • Some forms of cancer
  • And other conditions Autoimmune illnesses such as lupus or pemphigus are examples of this. Anaural hematoma, for example, is an injury to the ear. Ear cleaning that is excessive or wrong

Symptoms of Ear Infection (Otitis Externa) in Dogs

  • Using the shake of the head
  • Scratching the back of the neck
  • Rubbing one’s ears on the ground or other hard surfaces
  • Holding one or both ears lower than they would normally be
  • Redness at the entrance of the ear canal
  • Ear canal discharge that is yellow, brown, black, or pus-like in consistency
  • When the ear is touched, it hurts

How to Tell if Your Dog Has an Ear Infection

If your pet is exhibiting signs of an ear infection, it is critical that they see their veterinarian as soon as possible. After taking a sample of the discharge to examine under the microscope for ear mites, yeast, bacteria, and inflammatory cells, the veterinarian will do an examination. Additionally, your veterinarian will use an otoscope to examine the ear canal in depth to ensure that the eardrum is still intact and seems healthy. They can also check for any foreign material that could be present.

Because of the infection and inflammation in the ears, this procedure may necessitate the use of sedation.

What to Expect at the Vet When Your Dog Has an Ear Infection

Your pet will be subjected to a thorough physical examination at the veterinarian clinic. Your veterinarian will also collect a complete medical history from you. Prepare yourself to respond to key inquiries, which may include the following.

  • How long the symptoms have been present
  • How severe they are. If your dog suffers from allergies on a regular basis
  • If your dog has been diagnosed with one or more medical issues, you should consult your veterinarian. If your dog has a history of ear infections, see your veterinarian. Medications that your dog may be on are listed below. Dietary requirements for your dog
  • What products do you use to clean your dog’s ears and how often do you clean them
  • If you pluck or clip your dog’s ears, how frequently do you do so? Water sports, grooming, and bathing are examples of recent activities your dog has participated in.

The inner sections of the ear canal are examined with an otoscope, which is a specialized equipment with a long lens. Depending on the results of your veterinarian, it may be necessary to conduct further tests or procedures in order to arrive at a definitive diagnosis. There are a variety of them, including the following:

  • Extraction of ear samples for microscopic examination and culture in order to determine if pathogens are present – yeast, bacteria, and so on
  • Blood testing can aid in the diagnosis and exclusion of medical ailments such as endocrine abnormalities, autoimmune diseases, and other underlying problems. The use of biopsies or x-rays may be recommended in severe or persistent situations.

Are dog ear infections contagious?

Ear infections in dogs are not communicable in the majority of cases. However, it is dependent on the underlying reason. The presence of parasites, such as ear mites, can be particularly infectious if the underlying cause is parasites. If you have multiple dogs in your house and one of them has been infested with ear mites, it is presumed that all of your dogs are affected and that all of your pets will need to be treated together. A bacterial ear infection may be infectious as well as painful.

However, occurrences involving dogs are extremely rare.

Will my dog’s ear infection get better on its own?

The majority of instances of canine ear infections do not resolve on their own. Any form of ear condition should be brought to your veterinarian’s attention. It is necessary to assess the infection and the structural integrity of the eardrum. The treatment of a ruptured eardrum can be fairly challenging and will necessitate the assistance of a medical specialist. Some ear cleaning chemicals and drugs can also be hazardous to a dog’s middle ear, which is located in the center of his head. Chronic ear infections will take time (about 6-8 weeks) as well as the suitable treatment plan to completely resolve.

It is possible that stopping the treatment too soon or failing to identify the underlying reason can result in the recurrence of the ear infection, which will have a negative impact on your dog’s quality of life.

It may potentially result in complete deafness or hearing loss. Antibiotic resistance can also be a problem if the right dosage and treatment duration are not followed during the therapy.

How to Treat Dog Ear Infections

Your dog’s ears will be cleaned by your veterinarian in order to empty the ear canal of any ear wax, debris, or discharge that may be present. This is important in order for any medication provided to the dog’s ears to reach the inner ear canals.

Medications

When cleaning the dog’s ears, doctors typically use a medicated ear cleaning solution. It is possible that your veterinarian will prescribe an ear cleaner that you can use at home to clean your dog’s ears. In addition to topical treatments, oral antibiotics, and anti-inflammatory drugs may be administered to treat the condition. Because not all dogs tolerate ear treatments administered at home, talk to your veterinarian about long-acting ointments that may be instilled at the clinic and remain in the ear for several weeks.

Total Ear Canal Ablation (TECA)

In order to avoid recurrence of ear infections, this surgical technique comprises the removal of the ear canal along with the infected tissue from the inner ear. Surgery to treat serious ear infections, as well as those that have progressed to the point of becoming chronic issues and for which other therapies have failed, is available. Ear infections are not something that can be treated in a single visit. Any gaps in therapy might raise the likelihood of a return of the disease. You should heed the advise of your veterinarian on the following issues: Appointments should be double checked- Your dog should be evaluated on a frequent basis to see how he is responding to the medicine and whether or not the mending and repair process is progressing as it should.

Medications- It is impossible to overstate the significance of allowing your dog to complete the whole course of medicine that has been recommended for him.

When the course of therapy is not completed, it is possible to develop resistant infections.

Your veterinarian will explain the next measures, which may include sending a sample of the discharge for culture and sensitivity testing in order to identify the specific bacteria kinds that are present and select which antibiotic is the best option for the patient’s situation.

Additional Information

With dog ear medicines, there is a possibility of deafness. Antibiotics and steroids, in particular, are increasingly frequently implicated. If the eardrum is ripped or burst, the chance of hearing loss is increased. If you observe that your dog’s hearing has deteriorated while being treated for an ear infection, notify your veterinarian immediately. They will most likely recommend that you stop taking the medicine and come in to have your ear canal flushed completely with sterile saline to eliminate as much drug as possible from your system.

Fortunately, this is frequently a temporary deafness, and the ability to hear returns within a few weeks to months.

Expert Tips to Prevent Ear Infections in Dogs

With dog ear medicines, there is a danger of deafness. The use of certain antibiotics and steroids has been linked to this phenomenon more frequently. An eardrum tear or rupture increases the likelihood of hearing loss. You should consult with your veterinarian promptly if you feel your dog is losing his or her hearing during treatment for an ear infection. In most cases, they will recommend that you stop taking the medicine and come in to have your ear canal flushed completely with sterile saline to ensure that all of the drug is removed.

Read more:

Ten Interesting Facts About Your Dog’s Ears Pinnal Vasculitis: What is the cause of my dog’s crusty ears? The Ears of Your Pet: Examining and Taking Care of Them

Need to speak with a veterinarian regarding your dog’s ear infection or another condition?

Ears of Your Dog: 10 Interesting Facts About Them My dog’s ears are crusty because to Pinnal Vasculitis. The Ears of Your Pet: How to Examine and Care for Them

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