How To Tell If Your Dog Is In Pain?

If your dog is in pain they may:

  1. Show signs of agitation.
  2. Cry out, yelp or growl.
  3. Be sensitive to touch or resent normal handling.
  4. Become grumpy and snap at you.
  5. Be quiet, less active, or hide.
  6. Limp or be reluctant to walk.
  7. Become depressed and stop eating.
  8. Have rapid, shallow breathing and an increased heart rate.

Contents

What are the signs of a dog in pain?

What are the typical signs of pain in dogs? General behaviour: Shaking, flattened ears, low posture, aggression, grumpy temperament, panting or crying, excessive licking or scratching a specific area, reluctant to play, interact or exercise, lameness (limping), stiffness after rest, loss of appetite.

Can a dog be in pain and not show it?

Dogs feel pain the same way we do, but they don’t always show it in the same way. A dog’s pain can become evident through physical symptoms, behavioral changes and/or mobility issues. These might be subtle, so stay vigilant and never be afraid to ask your vet about anything that might signal that your dog is in pain.

How do dogs act when they are dying?

Some dogs will become restless, wandering the house and seeming unable to settle or get comfortable. Others will be abnormally still and may even be unresponsive. Your dog’s sleeping patterns may change. He may become cranky and difficult to handle, either due to pain or disorientation.

How do you test a dog for pain?

Look under the tail at the female’s vulva and note any redness or discharge. Have a little back bone. Pressing firmly on the spinal column, run your hand from the neck to the tail and note any signs of pain. Check the tail for skin lesions or pain as well.

What are the warning signs your dog is crying for help?

Watch for these 10 warning signs your dog needs to go to the veterinarian right away:

  • Change in Eating Habits.
  • Drinking a Lot or Too Little.
  • Difficult or Rapid Breathing.
  • Vomiting or Changes in Stool.
  • Lack of Energy or Lethargy.
  • Poor Balance or Difficulty With Regular Movement.
  • Irritated, Weeping or Red Eyes.

How do I know if my senior dog is suffering?

These include:

  1. avoiding slippery floor surfaces.
  2. difficulty getting up or slow to stand from a down position.
  3. difficulty or easing into a sitting or lying position.
  4. limping/lameness.
  5. lying down while eating or drinking.
  6. reluctance or inability to jump up onto furniture, a bed, or into a car.
  7. reluctance to go up or down stairs.

Do dogs know when they are dying?

This is the last and most heartbreaking of the main signs that a dog is dying. Some dogs will know their time is approaching and will look to their people for comfort. with love and grace means staying with your dog during these final hours, and reassuring them with gentle stroking and a soft voice.

What are the signs of a dog’s organs shutting down?

What are the signs of a dog’s organs shutting down? As your dog’s digestive organs shut down, they will not experience the sensation of hunger or thirst. Visible weight loss will often accompany this decrease in appetite. Even if your dog does still consume food or water, they may experience digestive issues.

How do I tell my dog goodbye?

A good end consists of three things: gratitude, the sharing of the favorite things, and goodbyes. Tell your dog how much he means to you, and what you’ve enjoyed about sharing a life with him. Thank him for being with you. Tell him what you love about him.

How do I know if my dog’s organs are shutting down?

The most prominent sign that you will notice is a complete relaxation of the body, your dog will no longer appear tense, rather they will “let go.” You will notice a slimming of the body as the air is expelled from their lungs for the last time and you may notice the lack of life in their eyes if they are still open.

What are signs of pain in animals?

How to recognize the common signs of pain in animals

  • Decrease or loss of appetite.
  • Quiet or submissive behavior.
  • Hissing, howling, whimpering or growling.
  • Increased and excessive grooming, licking self, biting self, etc.

The Most Obvious Signs of Pain in Dogs

Pain manifests itself in a number of ways in both wild and domestic animals. The fact that they are unable to speak does not exclude the possibility that they would be exposed to harmful and unpleasant stimuli. A range of illnesses, including injury, trauma, or an underlying issue such as canine arthritis, can cause discomfort in dogs. Always be on the lookout for small cues that your dog is in discomfort.

Obvious Signs of Pain in Dogs

  • There are many different ways that wild and domestic animals express pain. Despite the fact that they are unable to speak, they are nevertheless susceptible to being subjected to harmful or unpleasant stimuli. A multitude of illnesses, including injury, trauma, or an underlying problem such as canine arthritis, can result in pain in dogs of any age. Consider small cues that your dog is experiencing discomfort.

Subtle Signs of Pain in Dogs

  • Increased heart rate
  • Decreased appetite
  • Depression
  • Aversion to physical activity

Individual dogs’ displays of pain and anguish can differ dramatically based on their level of experience, age, and surroundings. Some dogs have a high pain threshold, while others are far more sensitive to discomfort. But make no mistake about it: dogs are capable of feeling pain as well as displaying indicators of discomfort. Unfortunately, veterinary patients are unable to express their emotions of discomfort verbally. Because of this, recognizing pain in canine patients is a crucial and, at times, challenging diagnosis to make.

What to Do if Your Dog Is in Pain

If you believe your dog is in discomfort, you should seek veterinary care immediately. If you find yourself in an emergency situation, follow these first-aid procedures. You may get more information on reading and comprehending your dog’s body language by visiting our tipshere page. Check out this post on how to remove a tick from your dog.

Canine Body Language

If you believe your dog is in discomfort, you should seek veterinary assistance immediately. First-aid procedures should be followed in an emergency. Please refer to our tipshere for additional information on how to read and comprehend your dog’s body language. How to Remove a Tick from Your Dog is a related article.

Signs And Symptoms That Your Dog Is In Pain

When individuals are in agony, it’s fairly difficult to ignore them the majority of the time. It is our painful back that we are wailing over. We scream because we’ve walked on something sharp and dangerous. To put pressure on a leg causes pain, which is why we limp. We lay down in the midst of the day, in utter calm and darkness, since we are suffering from a headache. Dogs, on the other hand, are not necessarily as simple to read as people. First and foremost, and this is the most evident, kids are unable to inform us if something hurts due of the entire “no talking” issue.

Excessive Vocalizations

In discomfort, even when they’re attempting to be tough, dogs tend to become more loud, but unless this is combined with some sort of distinctive physical activity, it might be difficult to detect instantly.

A injured dog may express himself or herself verbally in a variety of ways, including whining, whimpering, yelping, growling, snarling, and howling, among others. If he is vocalizing more than usual, find out what is going on.

Constant Localized Grooming

When a dog is in discomfort, he or she may frequently lick their paws in an attempt to soothe themselves. In the event that a dog gets injured, one of their initial impulses is to lick the wound in order to clean and care for it properly. When there is a visible wound, like as a cut, this is clear, but even when there is internal pain, dogs may lick the affected region in an attempt to alleviate the discomfort. If a dog is experiencing eye pain, he or she will lick their paws and massage their eyes.

Differences in Sleeping, Drinking, and Eating

Many dogs will sleep more when they are in pain, either because they are attempting to heal or because it is too difficult for them to move. Symptoms such as lack of appetite and changes in the amount and manner in which they drink are frequent in this context.

Altered Breathing

Is your dog panting despite the fact that she hasn’t done any exercise? Do her breaths appear to be coming in quicker or shallower? These are all possible indications that it is difficult for her to take a breath.

Changes to the Eyes

Squinting is a common occurrence in dogs suffering from eye discomfort. In addition, you may see that his pupils are smaller than normal. When there is pain in other regions of the body, the converse is true – the pupils enlarge in response to the discomfort.

Difficulty Resting

If your dog is in pain, it may be difficult for him or her to sit or lie down comfortably. This is why you should inspect them if you observe that they are sitting or sleeping in an odd position, or if they appear to be having difficulty keeping in one place. It is possible that they will continue to attempt to sit or lie down and will nearly soon get up and walk about again.

Withdrawing or Seeking Affection

When a dog isn’t feeling well, he or she may try to keep you away from them and may even hide from you. Others will be swarming around you, wanting attention on a continuous basis.

Aggressive Behaviors

Have you ever heard the phrase, “Like a wounded animal” before? There’s a good explanation behind this. In the event that an animal is injured or otherwise in distress, many may go into protective mode and attempt to convince you to keep away because they are concerned that you will damage them. Depending on what you do, your generally calm dog may start snarling, pinning his ears back, and even biting if you do something that causes him to be anxious or worried. Dogs who are often aggressive will occasionally exhibit the opposite behavior.

As long as your dog isn’t acting violently, one thing you may do to check for parasites is probe and prod them throughout their body (gently but firmly), much as your veterinarian would.

If you see anything that appears to be concerning, or if the strange behavior continues, take your pet to a veterinarian right once to get it diagnosed. In the past, how did you know if your dog was in pain and how did you tell?

How to recognise signs of pain in your pet

In the wild, dogs are notably skilled at masking signals of discomfort, which is fantastic for survival, but not so great for dog owners who want to preserve their dog’s quality of life and well-being in the domesticated environment. Having a thorough grasp of your dog’s nature and a keen eye for particular behaviors can help you to recognize subtle signs of suffering in your dog and respond to them in the most effective way possible. What causes dogs to hide their discomfort? Predators avoid preying on lesser animals by teaching them how to conceal symptoms of damage, disease, and discomfort.

Is there anything I should be on the lookout for?

Because they are descended from wild wolves, our domesticated dog breeds are well-versed at concealing signs of pain and discomfort.

The most common indicators of pain in dogs are as follows: Shuddering, flattened ears, low posture, hostility, grumpy disposition, panting or weeping, excessive licking or scratching in one particular location, lameness (limping), stiffness after resting, and loss of appetite are all signs of a dog suffering from arthritis.

Will these signals continue to be visible indefinitely?

It’s crucial to remember that when an animal is in pain, just a few of these behaviors are seen, and while they may be readily apparent in an acutely painful condition, same behaviors may be far more modest in more progressive or chronically painful situations.

You can keep an eye on your pet to observe things like:

  • Is it true that some behaviors become more prevalent after exercise? Whether or whether some behaviors are more noticeable in the morning or evening
  • Observe these behaviors more frequently after a prolonged walk on the weekends than than after a shorter stroll during the week

This information will assist you and your veterinarian in developing a picture of the condition, controlling it correctly, and keeping an eye out for any changes. What role does pain management play? There are numerous techniques to pain treatment in dogs, depending on whether the pain is caused by an acute injury or a more chronic one. It will be attempted to treat the underlying cause of the pain if feasible; however, if this is not an option, the pain management strategy chosen will be based on the following factors:

  • The nature of the discomfort
  • The length of time that it has been present (chronicity)
  • Any additional health conditions that your dog may be experiencing

A variety of basic alterations, such as timing levels of activity or making tiny changes to one’s living environment, might help alleviate the discomfort associated with a long-standing chronic disease. Our pain management specialists at Davies Therapy and Fitness Centre will examine your dog, give helpful exercise instruction, and use a range of therapy approaches to ease the pain and discomfort they are experiencing.

Contact us now to schedule an appointment. For further information, please see www.vetspecialiststherapy.co.uk.

Signs A Dog Is In Pain (how to tell if your dog is in pain)

Our canine companions may experience pain in the same way that we do. While the majority of pet owners feel they would be able to tell if their pet was in pain, the reality is that it can be quite difficult to detect. Do you know what to look for when you’re out and about? Given the fact that our canine companions may not be able to communicate with us verbally, we’ve compiled an useful checklist of physical signs that might notify us when they may be in discomfort.

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Is your dog in pain?

Our canines have an instinctual need to conceal suffering in order to avoid seeming weak, and as a result, they are exceptionally adept at concealing their diseases. Therefore, it is critical to be vigilant for changes in your dog’s behavior, to be aware of the indications to watch for, and to seek treatment if you feel your dog is in pain. We’ve put up a list of the most typical indicators that a dog is in pain to assist you know what to look for:

Vocalisation

In order to avoid seeming weak, our canines have an instinctual need to conceal suffering, and as a result, they are quite adept at concealing their illnesses. Therefore, it is critical to remain vigilant for changes in your dog’s behavior, to be aware of the indicators to watch for, and to seek treatment if you feel your dog is in discomfort. We’ve compiled a list of the most typical indicators that a dog is in pain to make it easier for you to recognize them.

Decreased social interaction or seeking attention

Our canines have an instinctual need to conceal suffering in order to avoid seeming weak, and as a result, they are quite adept at concealing their diseases. Therefore, it is critical to be vigilant for changes in your dog’s behavior, to be aware of the indications to watch for, and to seek medical attention if you feel your dog is in discomfort. We’ve compiled a list of the most typical indicators that a dog is in pain to assist you know what to look for:

Changes in posture or difficulty moving

Your dog’s posture appears to have changed, such that it now appears to hunch or be inflexible. Is there a difference in their walking style? It’s possible that their overall motions have changed, such as appearing to have trouble or being slow while getting up from a lying down position. Is it because they are having difficulty mounting the stairs or because they are not as active as they usually are? All of these indicators indicate that your dog may be in discomfort. It is also possible for some dogs to refuse to shift from a posture after they have become comfortable, and attempts to compel them may result in aggressive behavior.

Decreased appetite

In many cases, discomfort manifests itself as a loss of appetite in dogs, especially if they have previously liked their meals on a regular basis. You should take your pet to the veterinarian if they are having difficulty chewing, if they are consuming less or more water, or if their weight has fluctuated significantly.

Changes in grooming behaviour

When a dog is injured, their initial impulse is to lick the area in order to clean and care for the wound and prevent infection. Even if the wound isn’t apparent and the agony is internal, dogs may lick the affected region in an attempt to relieve themselves of their discomfort.

An example would be someone licking or biting their knee after tearing a ligament in their leg. If your dog is licking or chewing an area excessively, it is always advisable to take him to the veterinarian.

Changes in sleeping habits and restlessness

Is your dog no longer sleeping as soundly as he or she used to? When a dog is in discomfort, he or she will sleep more. It might be their body’s attempt to repair itself, or it could be because it is tough for them to move around and be active. Other dogs may show signs of restlessness and a difficulty to find a comfortable place to lie down. When your dog is in discomfort, it might be difficult for him or her to sit or lie down comfortably. They may lie in an odd posture or appear to have difficulty maintaining one position for long periods of time.

Physical changes

There are other less visible physical indicators that your dog is in discomfort that you should be aware of. Heavy breathing or shallow gasping, elevated heart rate, and bloodshot eyes are all possible signs of an infection. Swelling of their paws, legs, and cheeks are additional signs that they are in discomfort.

How to treat a dog in pain

If your dog is exhibiting any of the symptoms listed above and you suspect that they are in pain, you should seek veterinarian advice and treatment as soon as possible. Avoid treating your dog yourself, since human pain relief drugs can be highly deadly to dogs. Pain can arise for a variety of causes, and as a result, there are a variety of treatment options available based on the origin of the pain that is experienced. Your veterinarian will be able to propose the most effective treatment plan for your pet in order to keep him or her as comfortable as possible.

Visit our Pet Emergency Guide for further information on what to look for and what to do in the event of a pet emergency.

13 Warning Signs Your Dog Is in Pain

Photograph courtesy of Anna Hoychuk/Shutterstock

How to tell if a dog is in pain

Your dog is practically putting his life in your hands. Despite this, he may instinctively want to keep his grief hidden from you. It’s not because he has suddenly lost faith in your ability to support him. In fact, the problem is evolutionary hard-wiring that dates back thousands of years to your dog’s ancestor days as a hunter-predator and is responsible for his behavior. “From an evolutionary sense, dogs who displayed outward signals of suffering were more at danger of assault from a predator.

Jeff Werber, a veterinarian, explains that “from a survival standpoint, many animals attempt to conceal external symptoms of suffering.” However, you may still figure out what your dog really wants without having a whole dialogue with him.

Your usually ravenous pup won’t eat

No, your dog does not believe that she is in need of a weight-loss program. When it comes to dogs, a change in appetite might indicate a variety of medical issues. It might also indicate that your dog is in discomfort. The owners of chowhounds are typically aware when their dogs aren’t living up to their well-deserved reputation for devouring whatever they can get their paws on. It is possible that a lack of appetite, or inappetence as your veterinarian may refer to it, is an indication of pain or discomfort in your pet.

If your dog’s only indication is that she is skipping a meal, check to be that her food is fresh and that it passes the smell test before becoming alarmed.

You may try serving her a delicious, healthy meal that you know she will enjoy, such as cold home-cooked chicken without spice. If her appetite is disrupted for more than a day or two, take her to the veterinarian. Photograph by Annette Shaff/Shutterstock

Your dog is breathing heavily

No, your dog does not believe that she is in need of a weight-loss program. If your dog’s appetite changes, it might be an indication of a variety of medical issues. Alternatively, it might indicate that your dog is in discomfort. The owners of chowhounds are typically aware when their dogs aren’t living up to their well-deserved reputation for devouring anything they can get their paws on. Having a lack of appetite, or inappetence as your veterinarian may refer to it, might indicate that you are in pain or uncomfortable.

Prior to becoming concerned if your dog’s sole indication is that she is skipping a meal, check to be that her food is fresh and passes the smell test.

Make an appointment with the veterinarian if her appetite does not return after a couple of days.

Whimpering and whining

The sound has the potential to crush your heart. When a dog is in pain, some dogs stay stoically silent, while others, particularly young dogs that have not yet encountered physical discomfort, may whine and scream when they are in distress. It is possible that your presence will bring comfort and cause them to quit whimpering. It does not, however, imply that they are no longer in pain or suffering. Whimpering or increased vocalizations, which might be sporadic or persistent, or which can be triggered when touched, can indicate pain.

According to veterinarian Heidi Cooley, DVM, Chief of Staff at Banfield Pet Hospital, “Just because your dog is not crying does not imply he or she is not in pain.” If your dog has recently undergone surgery and is whining, check to be that you are administering the proper dosage of pain medicine.

For pet owners, it is critical to be aware of their pet’s behavior and routines, and to take action when you observe or believe that something is ‘wrong.’ There are a variety of reasons of pain in pets, some of which are potentially life-threatening.

They can be useful in determining the extent of your pet’s discomfort and assisting you in finding measures to alleviate it.

Cooley points out, the sooner you recognize and treat any indicators of discomfort or disease with your veterinarian, the greater your chances are of bringing your pet back to a comfortable state.

Pay close attention to these clues that your dog is more intelligent than you believe they are. PH888/Shutterstock

Your dog’s desire for affection changes

Your closest friend is normally insatiable in terms of cuddles and pats, but lately he has expressed a strong dislike towards being touched. Alternatively, it is possible that the inverse is true, and your independent friend has become a clinging vine. Pain has been related to several of these behavioral changes in the past. “Tigers don’t alter their stripes, and puppies don’t change how much they want to be cuddled.” It is possible that a change in the amount of time a dog enjoys being caressed or touched indicates that they are in pain.

  1. On the opposite side of the same coin is the avoidance of physical touch with another person.
  2. Robinson, if your dog is suddenly hiding, spending more time alone, refusing to play with toys they enjoy or avoiding stroking, there is most likely an understandable cause for this.
  3. All of these are indications that you may be in pain.
  4. Photograph courtesy of Anna Hoychuk/Shutterstock

Biting, growling, or snapping

When it comes to cuddling and pats, your closest friend generally can’t get enough, but lately, she has expressed a strong dislike for being touched. Alternatively, it’s possible that the inverse is true, and your once independent friend has become a clinging vine in his or her wake. Pain has been connected to several of these behavioral changes. “Tigers don’t alter their stripes, and puppies don’t change how much they want to be petted!” When a dog’s preference for being caressed or touched changes, it may be an indication that they are in pain.

  1. This identical coin has an opposing side that advocates for avoiding interaction with others.
  2. Robinson, if your dog is suddenly hiding, spending more time alone, refusing to play with toys that they enjoy or avoiding stroking, there is most likely a valid cause for it.
  3. All of these are indications that you may be experiencing discomfort.
  4. Shutterstock image courtesy of Anna Hoychuk.

Excessive licking

Your closest friend is normally insatiable in terms of cuddles and pats, but lately he has expressed a desire not to be touched. Alternatively, it is possible that the inverse is true, and your once independent friend has become a clinging vine. Pain has been connected to some of these changes in behavior. “Tigers don’t change their stripes, and puppies don’t change their cuddles!” A change in how much a dog enjoys being caressed or touched might be a clue that they are in pain. When a dog is wounded, he or she might become much more dependent on you, seeking for your attention and comfort.

According to Dr.

All of these are possible symptoms of discomfort. Vet bills might be pricey, but here’s a breakdown of what it costs to own a dog in general. Photo courtesy of Anna Hoychuk/Shutterstock

Arched back

It’s likely that your dog is in discomfort if he’s arching his back and tucking his tummy up and under. However, this behavior can also be a symptom of back pain, which can be caused by a spinal injury or pinched nerve, as well as anal pain produced by overfilled anal sac glands, among other things. In the opinion of the dog-walking website Wag!, a semi-permanent, arched position (as opposed to the leisurely-type stretching dogs sometimes undertake) indicates a medical emergency, and you should contact your veterinarian immediately.

Restlessness, or a change in sleeping habits

Pets suffering from pain may find it difficult to find a suitable resting posture for themselves. As a result, alterations in sleep patterns may indicate that a dog is in discomfort. In the event that your dog is normally a good sleeper (as most are), but suddenly becomes restless and unable to lie down, discomfort might be the cause. However, keep in mind that a dog that is in discomfort may sleep more than normal. And one of the indicators that your dog is depressed is that he is sleeping more than normal.

Blinking and squinting

Your dog’s eye injuries can produce varied degrees of pain and discomfort depending on their severity. In the event that you observe him blinking, squinting, crying, or pawing at his eye, he may be suffering from a corneal abrasion, eyelid difficulties (referred to as entropion), glaucoma, conjunctivitis, or other less common sorts of eye ailments, among others. Speak with your veterinarian about it. The Gladskikh Tatiana collection is courtesy of Shutterstock

Trembling

When it comes to canines, this typical sign of pain can be caused by a variety of illnesses including as renal disease, arthritis, distemper, or physical damage. This condition is frequently accompanied by additional symptoms, such as diarrhea and vomiting, as well as limping or stiffness while walking. When the weather changes, or when you are afraid of thunder or explosions, you may experience occasional trembling or shivering, but you can deal with these situations on your own. However, shaking in the torso or legs that is continuous or severe should always be investigated.

Kalamurzing/Shutterstock

Underlying causes of pain in dogs

Doctor Cooley explains that “broken bones and surgical recovery are the most evident painful symptoms.” ‘However, less evident and sometimes neglected ailments such as eye, skin, and ear disorders can also be extremely uncomfortable for dogs.’ A veterinarian should be consulted if your diabetic pet is experiencing underlying pain that should be assessed and treated.” Besides arthritis and cancer, other illnesses that can cause discomfort in dogs include gastro-intestinal disease, periodontal disease, hypothyroidism, and heart disease.

Photograph courtesy of Ivonne Wierink/Shutterstock

How you can help your dog when he is in pain

You should take your dog to the veterinarian as soon as you notice that he is in discomfort so that the source of his discomfort and the most appropriate therapy may be determined. As well as standard and popular pain management methods, there are other novel approaches, ranging from physical therapy to acupuncture, massage and ultrasound. “Your veterinarian is well-equipped to work with you to choose the best course of action for pain management in your pet,” Dr. Cooley explains. “Aspirin is pretty much the only thing that can be done at home to relieve pain,” explains Dr.

  1. Acetaminophen and ibuprofen are not indicated for use in dogs.
  2. The suggested amount of aspirin is one adult aspirin (325 mg) every 50-60 pounds of dog.
  3. Give one-quarter of an adult aspirin or one low-dose aspirin to a dog weighing 12-15 pounds, according to their weight (81 mg).
  4. It’s important to remember that aspirin should only be used for a limited period of time—two to three doses spaced out over a 12-hour period.

Following that, learn about the 20 things you should think about before adopting a dog from a rescue organization. The original publication date was August 12, 2019.

How Can I Tell If My Dog Is In Pain?

Anyone who loves their dog would never want to watch him struggle or be in agony. If your dog is experiencing discomfort, it might be tough to determine whether or not he is in pain. To be sure, there are occasions when it’s fairly clear, such as when there’s a perceptible limp, a major cut, or visible trauma, such as when someone has been struck by a car. However, your dog’s signals of discomfort can often be far more subtle. It is during these times that people frequently want instruction on what to look for in order to determine whether or not their dog is in discomfort.

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Signs That Could Indicate Pain in Dogs

A lot of dogs may be fairly stoic, and they can do a good (though not entirely successful) job of disguising and “living with” their discomfort. That, however, is not what we want for our pets, do we not? Unfortunately, there are a variety of indicators you may look for that may suggest that your dog is in discomfort. In the same way that you will be more aware of many other elements of care for your dog, these indicators (even if they are subtle) will be more clear to you if you have a strong understanding of your dog’s “normal.” This comprises his typical attitude, activity level, locomotion, hunger, thirst, sleep habits, and several other physical and behavioral patterns, among other characteristics.

Important note: When examining your dog for potential discomfort, please use extreme caution to avoid being bitten yourself (or anyone else who is assisting you).

This gets me neatly to the first clue I’d want to talk about today.

Five Dog Pain Tips:

  1. Pain symptoms can be subtle and difficult to detect
  2. As a result, they are often overlooked. Dogs who are in discomfort are more inclined to bite, therefore exercise caution
  3. When your dog is in pain, his or her behavior, respiration, heart rate, and even look might all alter. If your dog is in discomfort, contact your veterinarian. Never give your dog medicine unless your veterinarian has specifically ordered you to do so.

Biting or Snapping

Dogs who are under distress are more inclined to bite. This is true even when it comes to their owners and other individuals they are familiar with. This is especially true when the person in pain touches or moves the painful portion of the body. Some dogs will defend particular sections of their bodies that are in pain, and they will air snap if they believe that someone is seeking to touch that part of their body. For example, if your dog’s ear is aching due to an infection, he or she may snap or bite if you reach behind their ear to touch it, or even if you (or someone else) just extends a hand to pet their head.

Breathing Changes

When a dog is in discomfort, his breathing pattern may be quicker and more shallow than it would be otherwise. They may also pant at times. Some people report seeing a difference in the action of their abdominal muscles and/or chest muscles. The process of breathing involves the use of both sets of muscles at the same time.

Heart and Pulse Changes

When dogs are in discomfort, they may breathe more quickly and shallowly than they normally would.

They may also exhale via their mouths. Some people report seeing a shift in the action of their abdominal muscles and/or chest muscles. The process of breathing involves the use of both sets of muscles at the same time, as seen below.

Posture Changes

Dogs in pain may adopt a hard, “sawhorse-type” stance, while others may adopt the “praying position,” in which their front legs are on the ground, their buttocks are up in the air, and their abdomens are stretched out. Although it has the appearance of a “play bow,” it is anything from that. Others will be more “antsy” and have difficulties laying down and being comfortable while others will be more “clingy” and difficult to get comfortable. Whatever the cause, location, and degree of the pain, there is a solution.

Eye Changes

The eyes of a dog may be an excellent sign of discomfort. They differ depending on whether the pain is in the eyes or elsewhere in the body. Larger (dilated) pupils are often seen when pain occurs elsewhere else in the body; nevertheless, smaller (constricted) pupils are often seen when pain occurs in the eye(s), depending on the underlying injury or disease process and whether one or both eyes are afflicted. Aside from squinting, dogs suffering from pain may also paw at their eye(s) or drag them around the carpet or furniture.

ATTENTION DOGS: Foxtails (also known as grass seed awns) are a typical source of eye irritation in dogs during specific seasons of the year.

Food and Water Changes

When dogs are in discomfort, they tend to eat and drink less than usual. It is possible that when they eat and drink, they will drop food and/or water from their mouth if the source of their discomfort is their teeth or another area of their mouth.

Energy Level Changes

Canines experiencing discomfort frequently consume and drink less than they should. It is possible that when they eat and drink, they will drop food and/or water from their mouth if the source of their discomfort is their teeth or another region of the mouth.

Mobility Changes

When dogs are in discomfort, they tend to move less. It is possible for them to move the same amount as before, but in a different way based on what is hurting them (i.e. with a limp, or more slowly when going up or down the stairs). When it comes to dogs who are having difficulty with stairs due to leg/paw pain, it’s usually the case that those who are having difficulty going UP the stairs have pain in their backend (e.g., hip, knee, paw, etc.), while those who are having difficulty going DOWN the stairs have a problem with their front end (e.g., shoulder, elbow, paw, etc.) PRO TIP: Taking video of your dog with mobility issues walking or running might be beneficial, especially if the footage is shot in slow motion, in bright light, and with the camera/phone in landscape (horizontal) orientation.

Such films can sometimes assist your veterinarian in determining where the source of your dog’s discomfort is coming from.

Bathroom Changes

Dogs suffering from back pain, for whatever cause, may find it difficult to maintain the proper defecation position. Consequently, individuals may have difficulty going to the restroom. Dogs suffering from back pain may even get constipated as a result of the condition – however discomfort can also cause delayed motility of the intestines, which can result in constipation on its own.

Male dogs suffering from back pain or back leg discomfort may also alter their “urinating posture,” since it may be more difficult or unpleasant for them to elevate their leg to assume the usual male dog peeing position when suffering from back or back leg pain.

Body Contour Changes

Swelling, whether it occurs on your dog’s legs, body, or face, can be a symptom of a painful illness such as infection, inflammation, cancer, or other diseases and conditions. In certain cases, a swelling on the top of your dog’s snout or the bottom of their jaw, or even swelling around one of their eyes, might be an indicator of a tooth root abscess in your dog. A painful ailment that many dogs may tolerate while still eating properly, but which requires veterinarian attention to be resolved.

Conditions That are Often Painful for Dogs

However, while it is evident that a shattered bone, a gaping wound, or a recent surgical treatment can produce pain in your dog, these are not the sole causes of pain. Your dog may be a little uncomfortable after receiving their vaccinations because the injection sites may be sore as a result of the inflammation caused by the injection and vaccine. If your dog is in discomfort after being groomed, you should examine him or her carefully for signs of razor burn or harm to sensitive regions such as their ears or paw pads.

Make an appointment with your veterinarian if your dog has been diagnosed with any of the illnesses listed below.

In fact, if your dog is diagnosed with any medical condition, it is always a good idea to inquire with your veterinarian about if the disease has a pain component to it and, if so, what alternatives are available for treating that discomfort.

  • Cancer, particularly bone cancer, any sort of cancer that enlarges a capsular organ (e.g., the kidney or the spleen), and tumors that push on vital internal organs are major causes of death worldwide. Stones in the kidneys or bladder
  • Cystitis (bladder inflammation) is a medical condition that affects the bladder. A dog’s ear infection can be quite painful, especially if the infection has been present for a long period of time and/or if the infection has spread to the middle or inner ear. Learn about “when NOT to clean your dog’s ears” by reading this article. a condition characterized by inflammation of the pancreas (“pancreatitis”), the stomach (“gastritis”), and/or the intestines (“enteritis”) It might be the hip(s), the elbow(s), or any other joint(s) that is inflamed (referred to as arthritis).
  • The disease of cancer, particularly bone cancer, as well as any sort of cancer that enlarges a capsular organ (e.g. the kidney or the spleen), and tumors that push on vital internal organs
  • Urinary stone formation in the kidneys or bladder cystitis (bladder inflammation) is a condition in which the bladder becomes inflamed. It is extremely uncomfortable for dogs to have a middle or inner-ear infection, especially if the illness has been present for a long period of time and/or it affects the middle or inner ear. “When NOT to clean your dog’s ears” is a topic covered in detail here. a condition characterized by inflammation of the pancreas (“pancreatitis”), stomach (“gastritis”), and intestines (“enteritis”)
  • “Arthritis” refers to the inflammation of a joint – which might be the hip(s), elbow(s), or any other joint(s)
  • Danal glands that are infected, affected, or burst Damage to the cruciate ligament, often known as “sliding knee cap” (patellar luxation)
  • Sliding disc(s) (also known as intervertebral disc disease, or IVDD for short)
  • Periodontal disease or a tooth fracture are both possibilities. Glaucoma, uveitis, and corneal ulcers are all examples of eye issues.

Danal glands that have been infected, affected, or burst Knee cap “sliding” (patellar luxation) due to injury to the cruciate ligament; Sliding disc(s) (also known as intervertebral disc disease, or IVDD for short). Periodontal disease or a fractured tooth are both possibilities. Conditions affecting the eyes such as glaucoma, uveitis, and corneal ulcers;

Supplements and Other Ways to Help Dogs With Arthritis

In the first place, it should be reiterated that you should never give your dog human pain meds (including aspirin or “doggie aspirin”), and that you should never give them another dog’s prescription pain medications, unless specifically instructed to do so by your veterinarian. However, if you are concerned that your dog is suffering from arthritis, this does not rule out any treatment options. Fatty acids found in fish oils, known as Omega 3 fatty acids, have anti-inflammatory qualities that can aid to reduce and alleviate joint discomfort.

Consider some of the prescription joint-health diets that you may discuss with your veterinarian, as well as some of our preferred fish oil and joint supplement brands.

Fish Oils

Anti-inflammatory fish oils, such as cod liver oil, can help to reduce the inflammation and discomfort associated with arthritis. Even while they aren’t strictly a “magic bullet” or a stand-alone treatment for dogs suffering from arthritis, they may be an important component of a multi-faceted strategy to pain management. Besides being beneficial for skin and coat issues, fish oils may also be beneficial in the treatment of renal illness, canine cognitive impairment (often known as “doggie dementia”), and potentially other disorders.

You can give your dog fish oils that are labeled “human,” but you must be cautious.

The fish oils mentioned below are three of the best brands and formulations that I’ve found and utilized for dogs throughout the course of my research.

Liquid formulations make dosing easier, but you may also clip the tops off of capsules and spray the fish oil liquid over your dog’s food if that is what you want.

Nutramax Welactin Fish Oil Supplement for Dogs is a high-quality fish oil supplement for dogs. Vetoquinol Tri-OMEGA Supplement for Cats is a veterinary supplement that contains three omega fatty acids. Free Form Omega 3 Supplement for Dogs

Blood Protein Supplements

Canine supplements that include immunoglobulin-rich blood proteins may assist to decrease inflammation, improve healing, and give a variety of additional advantages to their owners. A great deal of favorable comment has been received from dog owners about the WINPROline of supplements (Immunity, Mobility, Allergy, Focus, and Training). Our dogs like the flavor of the WINPRO supplements, based on our own experience. Because you only feed your dog one or two treats each day (depending on their weight), a bag of 60 treats will last you 1-2 months.

WINPRO Mobility Joint Supplement is a supplement that helps with joint mobility.

Joint Supplements for Dogs

Canine supplements that include immunoglobulin-rich blood proteins may assist to decrease inflammation, enhance healing, and give a variety of additional health advantages. A great deal of favorable feedback has been received from dog owners about the WINPROline of supplements (Immunity, Mobility, Allergy, Focus, Training). Our dogs like the flavor of the WINPRO supplements, based on our own personal experience with them. A bag of 60 treats can last you 1-2 months if you just feed your dog one or two each day (depending on their weight).

WINPRO Mobility Joint Supplement is a joint supplement that helps you move more easily and comfortably.

Joint Relief and Mobility Diets for Dogs

There are prescription joint/mobility foods available that are particularly created to assist arthritic dogs maintain their mobility. Hill’s Metabolic + Mobility and Royal Canin Mobility Supportdog feeds are examples of such products. Consult with your veterinarian to determine whether such a diet would be beneficial for your dog.

Increasing Mobility for Dogs

Having hardwood floors or other slippery surfaces in your house might exacerbate pain and movement concerns in an older dog or a dog with arthritis, which can make them more difficult to manage. Aside from administering the vitamins listed above and any prescription treatments recommended by your veterinarian, something as basic as carpet runners, non-slip dog socks, or a set of pet stairs can make an enormous difference in your dog’s mobility and overall well-being. For additional information, see “How to Help an Older Dog With Arthritis and Other Mobility Problems.” By keeping an eye out for any small changes in your dog’s behavior and body language, you may determine whether or not he is suffering from any underlying pain.

When your dog’s pain is appropriately treated with medicine, vitamins, and a pleasant home environment, they will have a higher quality of life.

How to Tell if a Dog Is in Pain

Having hardwood floors or other slippery surfaces in your house can exacerbate pain and movement concerns in an older dog or a dog with arthritis, which can make them much more difficult to manage. Aside from administering the vitamins listed above and any prescription treatments recommended by your veterinarian, something as basic as carpet runners, non-slip dog socks, or a pair of pet stairs can make an enormous difference in your dog’s mobility and independence. You may find out more by reading “How to Help an Elderly Dog With Arthritis and Other Mobility Problems.” In order to address any underlying discomfort that may be present in your dog, you must keep an eye out for any minor changes in their behavior and body language.

In order to prevent and cure your dog’s suffering, you should consult with your veterinarian. Providing your dog with correct pain management, vitamins, and a pleasant living environment will improve their overall quality of life.

  1. 1 Keep an eye out for limping. Limping is one of the most noticeable indications of discomfort. Limping happens when it is painful to bear weight on one of the legs.
  • If one of their legs is in discomfort, they are less likely to utilize it, and they may have to rely on the other three legs in some cases. Dogs that are in discomfort will also tend to move less than usual.
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2 Keep an eye out for any additional concerns with mobility. Aside from limping, you may notice additional changes in your mobility. For example, your dog may have difficulty getting up and down from the ground. It may also move more slowly than normal, or express reluctance to engage in specific activities, depending on the situation.

  • Other mobility concerns should be kept in mind. You may notice various changes in your mobility in addition to limping. If your dog has difficulty getting up or down, for example, you should seek professional assistance. It may also move more slowly than normal, or express reluctance to engage in specific activities, depending on the circumstances.

Advertisement 3: Pay attention to changes in posture. Take note of the position in which your dog’s head or tail is held. In dogs who ordinarily have an active tail, any deviation from their regular position, such as a dangling or tucked tail, might be indicative of discomfort.

  • This might be an indication that your dog is experiencing discomfort if it is gripping a limb differently from how it would typically do so. In addition, pain may cause your dog to stand with its back arched or to be extremely rigid when standing or moving about.

4 Pay attention to how your dog is breathing. It is possible to notice an increase in your dog’s respiratory rate or excessive panting if he or she is in discomfort.

  • In some cases, dogs that pant excessively, especially in chilly temperatures, may be in discomfort.

5 Look into your dog’s eyes. The expression on your dog’s face may tell you a lot about how much pain he or she is in. In the case of eye discomfort, you may notice squinting, redness, cloudiness, or discharge in the affected eye(s).

  • It’s possible that your dog is rubbing at the sore spot as well. If your dog scratches around its eyes on a regular basis, this might indicate that it is experiencing discomfort in this region. Pain in other places of the body can also be detected through the eyes. Some dogs squint when they are suffering from pain in the eye area, but some dogs will also squint when they are suffering from discomfort in another part of their body. Dilated pupils might also indicate that your dog is experiencing discomfort.
  1. 1 Be on the lookout for biting. Pain has the ability to alter a dog’s behavior. It is possible that a friendly dog in extreme pain will bite you more often.
  • An approaching dog that has never bitten before may bite when approached if it is in substantial pain. A dog in pain may also bite if you touch or move an area that is in discomfort with your fingers. When a painful location is touched, the natural response is for the person to turn toward the painful spot. The dog may attempt to attack out of instinct
  • You may notice warning signals such as snarling before the bite occurs. The ears of a dog on the edge of biting may be pinned back and the fangs displayed. This is a natural pain-prevention method that a dog may employ in order to attempt to avoid more discomfort.

2 Keep an eye on your dog’s food intake. When a dog is in discomfort, it may reduce its food consumption. In the event that your dog’s appetite suddenly decreases, this might be an indication of pain or disease. In that scenario, it’s critical to take it to the veterinarian as soon as possible to rule out a more serious problem.

  • Inspect your dog’s food intake regularly. When a dog is in discomfort, it may reduce its food intake. This might be a symptom of discomfort or disease if your dog’s appetite suddenly decreases unexpectedly. The animal should be taken to the veterinarian as soon as possible in that scenario to rule out a more serious problem with the animal.

3Be on the lookout for indicators of restlessness. Restlessness and reluctance to get comfortable are common symptoms of a dog suffering from discomfort. The way your dog expresses this is by pacing, continuously altering its posture, or getting up and down on the floor regularly. 4Take note of any changes in sleep patterns. When a dog is in pain, it is possible that its typical sleep routine will be disrupted. When a dog is in discomfort, he or she may sleep more than normal or may have difficulties falling asleep.

Pain can manifest itself in a variety of ways, including unusual vocalizations like as moaning, groaning, whimpering, yipping, and growling.

  • These noises may be connected with certain motions, such as when first getting out of bed in the morning. That may provide you with some insight into the nature of the discomfort. A dog that is ordinarily talkative may also become deafeningly quiet for no apparent reason.

6 Keep an eye out for avoidance behaviors. When a dog is in pain, it is normal for him to engage in avoidance behaviors such as hiding or shying away from interaction with people or other animals. These actions are an attempt to avoid possibly painful circumstances in the future.

  • If your dog turns away from you when you try to pat him or makes other attempts to avoid contact, this might be an indication that he or she is in discomfort. If your dog generally enjoys being stroked, keep an eye out for these kinds of actions. It is possible that these behaviors are associated with a dog being more reclusive and less engaged than usual. It is also possible that your dog is suffering from depression or mental dullness
  • However, this is not always the case. If your dog is in discomfort, keep in mind that he or she may seek out more attention rather than avoiding it. When someone avoids you or engages in excessive attention-seeking behavior, you should take note.

7 Pay close attention to your dog’s toileting behavior. Becoming familiar with your dog’s usual potty habits can assist you in identifying a variety of different concerns.

  • When a dog is in discomfort, you may observe that it urinates or defecates in a different position than when it is not. For example, a male dog who regularly lifts his leg to pee may not do so in this instance. You may also notice a difference in how frequently your dog needs to go to the bathroom. Additionally, your dog may have accidents if it is difficult for them to reach the location where they normally relieve themselves
  • Pain can also cause a change in the consistency of a dog’s feces as a result of the stress it causes. Congestion is another side effect of this medication.

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  • Question Why is my dog acting so sluggish and howling while I’m not in the room? What should I do? A veterinarian with over 30 years of expertise in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice, Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS, is a member of the British Veterinary Medical Association. Veterinary medicine and surgery were among the subjects she studied when she graduated with honors from the University of Glasgow in 1987. She has been employed at the same animal clinic in her hometown for more than two decades now. Contribute to wikiHow by unlocking this expert answer provided by a veterinarian. Separation anxiety manifests itself in the form of howling when you are not present. This may or may not be connected to the feeling of being drained. One possible reason is that if the dog is feeling poorly and you are a source of comfort, the dog may howl when you are not around. If this is the case, the dog should be examined by a veterinarian to determine the source of his or her discomfort. To avoid rewarding the howling in the event of separation anxiety, be sure to only re-enter the room when the dog is silent, rather than while he is howling. Question When my German shepherd is caressed forcefully in the hind parts, he winces a little. When her ears are touched, she also appears to be in discomfort. The veterinarian is unable to identify a problem. What could possibly go wrong? A veterinarian with over 30 years of expertise in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice, Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS, is a member of the British Veterinary Medical Association. Veterinary medicine and surgery were among the subjects she studied when she graduated with honors from the University of Glasgow in 1987. She has been employed at the same animal clinic in her hometown for more than two decades now. Contribute to wikiHow by unlocking this expert answer provided by a veterinarian. A thorough examination by a veterinarian is always an excellent starting point to rule out any evident physical concerns. If the dog only reacts in this manner when she is being touched, it is possible that she is anticipating discomfort and is flinching away from the experience. This can become learnt behavior, resulting in the dog repeating the same activity even when she is not in discomfort. If she is not lame and does not have an ear infection, it is possible that this is the situation. If she is unable to walk, radiographs would be taken to determine the cause of her disability. Question Is my dog refusing to eat a clue that he is in pain? The owner of Boston Veterinary Clinic, Brian Bourquin, also known as “Dr. B” to his clientele, is a veterinarian and the owner of the South End/Bay Village facility as well as three other locations in Massachusetts: the Seaport in Boston and Brookline. The Boston Veterinarian Clinic specializes on basic veterinary care, which includes wellness and preventative care, ill and emergency treatment, soft-tissue surgery, and dentistry for pets and livestock. Specialty services are also available, including behavioral and nutritional counseling, as well as alternative pain management techniques, such as acupuncture and therapeutic laser treatments A member of the AAHA (American Animal Hospital Association), the Boston Veterinary Clinic is also the city’s first Fear Free Certified Clinic. The Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) Brian has obtained from Cornell University is the culmination of nearly 19 years of veterinary expertise. Contribute to wikiHow by unlocking this expert answer provided by a veterinarian. If your pet has previously consumed a certain meal but has shown no interest in it, I would recommend that you take them to the veterinarian before doing anything else. It is possible for an animal to cease eating due to a variety of ailments. Also, you might want to see whether there’s anything wrong with the particular brand of food you’re considering purchasing. As a result of the high fat content in dog food, it is possible that it will grow rancid.

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  • You should be concerned if your dog is standing motionless and his face is turned to the corner of the room. He may be in excruciating agony. Make sure you don’t aggravate the situation. It is sometimes necessary to seek out the discomfort in order to recognize it. Sometimes the only way to accomplish this with a dog is touching or moving a region that might cause pain. You may have witnessed your veterinarian do this procedure while examining your dog, but veterinarians are trained to perform this procedure without inflicting more damage to your dog. If you don’t have this training, you might end up hurting a dog you’re attempting to diagnose. The objective should not necessarily be to find the source of the discomfort, but rather to assess whether or not your dog is in pain. Following the receipt of a response, it is necessary to discuss with your veterinarian regarding various options. If you have reason to believe your dog is in discomfort, pay close attention to it. Pain is something that dogs instinctively conceal since it is an indication of weakness to predators in the environment. In certain cases, it may be impossible to determine whether or not your dog is in pain unless you are extremely alert
  • Several symptoms that your dog is in discomfort are difficult to detect. You’ll be much more likely to notice these minor shifts if you’re familiar with what’s usual. If you are familiar with your dog’s typical activities and habits, you will be able to spot any changes more quickly. When it’s snowing or icy outside, make sure your dog’s feet are properly protected by outfitting them with appropriate gear. If you want to keep your dog warm, you can wrap him in a Velcro jacket.

You should be concerned if your dog is standing motionless and his face is turned to the corner of the room. He might be in excruciating agony. Make sure you don’t aggravate the discomfort. It’s not always necessary to locate the discomfort in order to recognize it. To do this with a dog, it is often necessary to physically manipulate areas that may be painful. Vets are trained to do this procedure without inflicting more damage to your dog, and you may have witnessed them perform it when they checked your dog.

  • If your dog is in pain, your primary priority should not necessarily be to find the source of the suffering.
  • If you’re concerned that your dog is in discomfort, keep a careful eye on him or her.
  • Except if you are hyper-vigilant, it may be difficult to discern if your dog is in pain.
  • If you are familiar with the standard, it is much simpler to notice these minor variations.
  • Wearing correct footwear for your dog’s feet in snowy or icy conditions will help to keep their feet from becoming injured.

Put a Velcro jacket on your dog to keep him warm if you want to.

  • If your dog is completely immobile, with his face in the corner of the room, he may be in a great deal of discomfort. Take cautious not to aggravate the situation. Sometimes you have to look for the pain in order to realize it is there. Sometimes the only way to accomplish this with a dog is touching or moving a region that may be painful. You may have witnessed your veterinarian do this procedure while examining your dog, however veterinarians are trained to perform this procedure without inflicting more damage to the dog. If you don’t have this training, you might end up hurting the dog you’re attempting to diagnose. The objective should not necessarily be to find the source of the discomfort, but rather to assess whether or not your dog is in pain. Once you’ve received an answer, it’s time to chat with your veterinarian about alternative options. If you’re concerned that your dog is in discomfort, keep a careful eye on him. Pain is something that dogs instinctively conceal since it is an indication of vulnerability to predators in the environment. If you are not hyper-vigilant, it may be difficult to discern if your dog is in pain. Several symptoms that your dog is in discomfort are difficult to notice. If you are familiar with what is usual, it is much simpler to notice these minor variations. If you are familiar with your dog’s typical activities and habits, you will be able to spot any changes more readily. When it’s snowing or icy outside, make sure your dog’s feet are protected by outfitting them with appropriate gear. If you want to keep your dog warm, you can wrap it in a Velcro jacket.

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About This Article

Summary of the ArticleXPhysical changes in a dog, such as limping, fast breathing, and strange postures, might indicate that the dog is in pain. Take note of any changes in your dog’s feeding and sleeping routines, and keep an eye out for any unusual behavior, such as biting or avoiding interaction with other people. Excessive and unusual vocalizations, such as moaning and groaning, whining and yipping, as well as snarling, are further symptoms that your dog may be in discomfort. Continue reading to discover about the warning signs that your dog is having a problem with his or her toilet habits.

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