How To Tell If Your Dog Has An Ear Infection? (Solved)

Typical Dog Ear Infection Symptoms

  1. Scratching of the ear or area around the ear.
  2. Brown, yellow, or bloody discharge.
  3. Odor in the ear.
  4. Redness Swelling Crusts or scabs on inside of the outer ear.
  5. Hair loss around the ear.
  6. Rubbing of the ear and surrounding area on the floor or furniture.
  7. Head shaking or head tilt.

Contents

How can I treat my dogs ear infection at home?

Apple cider vinegar can help reduce the itch and discomfort of an ear infection. Mix 1 part vinegar and 1 part filtered or spring water. Clean the visible parts of the ear with a cotton ball soaked in the mixture. Make sure you get the liquid into the ear canal by holding your dog’s ear still.

Can a dog ear infection go away on its own?

In most cases, a dog’s ear infection will not go away on its own. What’s worse, if you wait too long to treat the ear infection, it can become much more difficult to get under control. An untreated ear infection can lead to chronic issues, hearing loss, and sometimes the need for expensive surgery.

How do you check if my dog has an ear infection?

But ear infections often cause significant discomfort and affected dogs may show signs such as:

  1. Head shaking.
  2. Scratching at the affected ear.
  3. Dark discharge.
  4. Odor.
  5. Redness and swelling of the ear canal.
  6. Pain.
  7. Itchiness.
  8. Crusting or scabs in the ears.

How can I get rid of my dogs ear infection without going to the vet?

Apple cider vinegar works by killing both yeast and bacteria. Use a mixture of 50% organic apple cider vinegar and 50% water, soak a cotton ball and clean your dog’s ears. If you notice your dog in pain or her ears drying out too much, discontinue use and see your vet.

What foods cause ear infections in dogs?

An excess of grain and/or sugar in the diet is a common causes of ear infections in dogs. Sugar feeds the yeast already in the body and causes an overgrowth, which results in the dark, yeasty-smelling buildup inside the ears.

What is the brown stuff in my dog’s ears?

A waxy, yellow, or reddish-brown ear discharge can also be a sign your dog has an ear infection, which can be a result of allergies, mites, polyps, overproduction of ear wax, excessive bathing or swimming (which can leave too much moisture in the ears), or other problems.

What does a dog ear infection smell like?

These types of ear infections usually involve more than one type of bacteria. These bacteria can cause ears to smell sweet like grapes or caramel or rancid like rotten chicken or bad breath. Dogs with bacterial infections in their ears may rub their ears on the ground or on furniture to relieve itchiness.

When should I take my dog to the vet for an ear infection?

If your dog shows any of the following signs of an ear infection contact your vet straight away to book an examination for your pet. Early treatment of ear infections can help to prevent more severe symptoms from developing. Common signs of ear infections in dogs include: Scratching or pawing at the ear.

Can I put peroxide in my dogs ear?

Don’t use hydrogen peroxide on your pup. This common household product can actually cause irritation to healthy skin cells. Ears contain very sensitive tissue, and extended use of hydrogen peroxide could eventually lead to damage of the ear itself. Stick to veterinarian-approved cleaners.

Why does a dog shake his head?

Head shaking is normal dog behaviour. Without fingers and thumbs, dogs instinctively shake their heads to relieve discomfort, itchiness or irritation; it’s an effective way to clear the ear canal of water, dirt, or insects.

How can I soothe my dogs itchy ears?

A few dog-friendly home treatments:

  1. Calendula lotion.
  2. Apple cider vinegar (diluted)
  3. Hydrocortisone ointment.
  4. Mullein oil.
  5. Antihistamines.

How to Spot an Ear Infection In Your Dog

Did you know that certain breeds of dogs are more susceptible to ear infections than other breeds? Yes, it is correct. Dogs with floppy ears, such as Cocker Spaniels, Basset Hounds, and other long-eared breeds, are more prone to ear infections than dogs with upright ears, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association. Dogs that spend a lot of time in the water feel the same way. According to both examples, they have an excessive amount of moisture trapped in their ears, which allows germs to proliferate and thrive in their ears.

Discover the three types of ear infections that dogs can develop, the most prevalent causes of these infections, and the signs to look out for so you can know when to call your veterinarian for an appointment.

What Are the Three Types of Canine Ear Infections?

According to the American Kennel Club, “There are three types of ear infections in dogs: otitis externa, otitis media, and otitis interna, which affect various areas of the canine ear.” An otitis externa is an inflammation of the layer of cells lining the exterior or external section of the ear canal, which is the most common kind. When we talk about ear infections, we’re referring to infections of the middle and inner ear canals. These infections are most typically caused by a spread of infection from the external ear.

That is why it is critical to prevent ear disorders and to seek treatment as soon as they occur.” Aside from the possible risk, you want your dog to be more comfortable!

Now that you’re aware that there are several distinct types of ear infections, and that they’re typically (but not always) caused by bacteria, let’s go over the specifics.

What Causes Canine Ear Infections?

There are three types of ear infections in dogs, according to the American Kennel Club: otitis externa, otitis media and otitis internal. Each kind affects distinct areas of the canine ear.” As the name suggests, otitis externa is an inflammatory condition in which cells lining the outside or external section of the ear canal are affected. When we talk about ear infections, we’re referring to infections of the middle and inner ear canals, and they’re most typically caused by bacteria that have traveled from the external ear.

Because of this, it is critical to prevent ear issues and to receive early treatment if they occur.” Aside from the possible risk, you want your dog to be more comfortable.

Ear infections may be quite uncomfortable. After reviewing the many forms of ear infections and the fact that they are typically (but not always) caused by bacteria, let’s go into the specifics of how they happen.

Typical Dog Ear Infection Symptoms

Whether you’re not sure how to tell if your dog has an ear infection, have a look at this useful list of signs and symptoms.

  • An ear scratching or scratching of the skin around the ear discharge that is brown, yellow, or bloody
  • A foul odor in the ear Redness Swelling Crusts or scabs on the interior of the outer ear’s inner surface
  • Hair loss in the area around the ear Scratching one’s ear and surrounding region against the floor or furniture
  • Unusual eye movements
  • Head shaking or tilting
  • Loss of equilibrium
  • Unsteadiness Circumnavigating in circles
  • Hearing impairment

According to the chart above, some of these symptoms appear to be more visible than others. If your dog is pawing at his ears or shaking his head more than normal, take a quick look inside his ear to see what’s wrong. Is there a nasty odor in the room? Is it a bright red color? Regardless of the situation, you should bring your dog in for an assessment. Ear infections may manifest themselves rapidly as well, so don’t assume they will take days to manifest themselves. A few hours may make a world of difference between your dog being well and suffering from a severe ear infection.

How to Tell If Your Dog Has an Ear Infection

According to the chart above, some of these symptoms appear to be more noticeable than other. Taking a quick look at your dog’s ears may reveal that he is pawing at them or tossing his head more than normal. Is there a nasty odor in the building or room? Is it a crimson colour? Regardless of the outcome, you should bring your dog in for an assessment. You should not be under the impression that ear infections take weeks or months to appear. A few hours may make a world of difference between your dog’s health and his suffering from an ear infection.

Types of Ear Infections

Ear infections in dogs can manifest themselves in a variety of ways, including:

  • It is also known as Otitis Externa, which refers to inflammation that occurs on the outside region of the ear canal. An infection that occurs in the middle of the ear, also known as Otitis Medina or Otis Media
  • It is important to recognize the signs and symptoms of an inner ear infection. If left untreated, Otitis Interna can cause severe hearing loss.

Causes of an Ear Infection in Dogs

Inflammation that occurs on the outside region of the ear canal is referred to as Otitis Externa. An infection that occurs in the middle of the ear, often known as Otitis Medina or Otitis Media; It is important to recognize the signs and symptoms of an inner ear infection. If left untreated, Otitis Interna can cause severe hearing impairment.

  • An accumulation of ear wax A buildup of moisture in the ear
  • An excessive amount of hair in the ear canal

In many situations, ear infections are the result of an underlying ailment, such as one of the following conditions:

  • Infections, allergies, ear mites, hormonal imbalances, parasites, scratching within the ear, tumors, and other conditions

Some dogs are also more prone to ear infections than others, and this is due to genetics. While any dog can get one, breeds with floppy ears, such as Cocker Spaniels and English Bulldogs or Hounds, are at a higher risk of developing one. Canines suffering from certain medical disorders, such as hypothyroidism, are also at increased risk of contracting the disease. ‌

How to Tell If Your Dog Has an Ear Infection

It is critical for pet parents to be aware of the signs and symptoms of an ear infection. When there is substantial head tilting or shaking of the head, this is one of the most typical indicators. These motions may be an indication that the dog is in distress. Other signs and symptoms of a dog ear infection are as follows:

  • Chewing on toys is avoided at all costs. the stench of rotten eggs emanating from the ears
  • Discharge from the ears that is brown, white, or yellow in color
  • Crusting or scabbing of the skin around the ears. Excessive scratching of the ears
  • Hair loss is a common occurrence. Loss of equilibrium, which can occur when an ear infection spreads to the inner ear canal
  • When the dog or pet owners touch the dog’s ears, the dog may yell or grimace in discomfort. An increase in the amount of redness and swelling around the ears
  • Itchy ears can be relieved by rubbing them against rough things.

The symptoms listed above can be distressing for a dog, and they can worsen the longer the canine is left without medical attention. ‌

Seek Treatment Right Away

The symptoms listed above can be distressing for a dog, and they can worsen the longer the canine is left without medical attention and treatment. ‌

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Signs Your Dog Has an Ear Infection (and How to Get Rid of It)

Dogs are prone to ear infections, which are rather frequent. Make sure you understand how to recognize when your dog is suffering from one so that you can get them feeling well as soon as possible. As a dog owner, it’s a good idea to get aware with the indications of canine ear infections so that you can recognize them when they occur. According to the American Kennel Club, it’s a common ailment that affects up to one in every five dogs.

If left untreated, it can result in scarring that narrows the ear canal and causes hearing loss. Depending on the severity of the illness, dogs may lose their hearing. Although these infections are difficult to treat, the good news is that they are often avoidable and, in many cases, preventative.

What Causes Ear Infections in Dogs?

In dogs, “ear infections arise when the skin surface becomes unhealthy,” explains Emily Pashaian-Grant, DVM, medical director of the VCA Sylvania Vet Animal Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. “The most effective method of preventing ear infections is to identify the underlying cause of the illness. You will be able to avoid or address whatever is causing the problem in this manner.”

YeastBacteria

It is natural for dogs to have a collection of microbes that dwell on the surface of their skin, just like it is for humans (called a microbiome). The majority of the time, these microorganisms are completely harmless. Nevertheless, Grant explains that if the regular skin barrier is damaged in any way and becomes irritated and inflamed, it allows microorganisms to flourish unabated. “It is believed that ear infections are caused by an excess of yeast, bacteria, or a mix of the two,” she says further.

Ear Mites

It is natural for dogs to have a collection of microbes that dwell on the surface of their skin, just like it is for us (called a microbiome). Many times, these bacteria are quite safe to be around. If the natural skin barrier is compromised in any way, such as by becoming irritating or inflamed, microorganisms have the opportunity to multiply unchecked, according to Grant. ” As she says, “ear infections are caused by an excessive development of yeast, bacteria, or a mix of both.”

Moist Ears

It is natural for dogs to have a collection of microbes that dwell on the surface of their skin, just as it is for humans (called a microbiome). The vast majority of the time, these microorganisms are completely harmless. Nevertheless, Grant explains that if the regular skin barrier is interrupted in any way and becomes irritated and inflamed, it allows microorganisms to flourish uncontrolled. “Ear infections are caused by an excess of yeast, bacteria, or a mix of the two,” explains Dr. Sherry.

Allergies

When it comes to recurrent ear infections, allergies are frequently the root cause. Grant advises that if your dog has multiple ear infections, it may be time to pursue allergist testing. According to the American Kennel Club, ear infections occur in 80 percent of dogs with food allergies and 50 percent of dogs with environmental allergies, respectively.

Dog Ear Infection Symptoms

Puppies suffer from ear infections that are quite unpleasant. Consequently, you’ll most likely see your dog scratching his ears or shakily tossing his head. Other signs and symptoms include red, inflamed skin within the ears, as well as brown, yellow, or green drainage from the ear canal. Ear infections can sometimes be quite unpleasant to deal with.

How to Treat a Dog Ear Infection

If it comes to the stage of infection, “typically, you’ll require prescription medicine,” Grant explains. Seeing your veterinarian as soon as you see symptoms is recommended because ear infections do not heal on their own and must be treated immediately. In order to determine if the discharge is caused by mites, yeast, or bacteria, your veterinarian will collect a sample of the discharge and examine it under a microscope. If it is, your veterinarian will prescribe the necessary treatment. Antibiotics, antifungals, and anti-mite drugs are some of the treatments that are often given topically to the skin.

While they are lying down, a woman places eardrops in the blond terrier mix’s ear.

“If it turns out to be a one-time ear infection, we won’t do anything more.

However, if your dog has numerous ear infections, we will discuss allergy testing so that we can develop a more effective long-term strategy for your pet’s treatment. It may be necessary to modify food intake or use long-term medication to resolve canine allergies.”

Home Remedy to Prevent Infections

Maintaining the cleanliness and dryness of your dog’s ears is the most critical thing you can do at home to avoid ear infections. Grant suggests cleaning your dog’s ears at least once a month to keep them in good condition. You may either purchase a dog ear wash from the market or manufacture your own cleaning solution at home by mixing half water and half hydrogen peroxide together. Is it tough to persuade your dog to stay still for an extended period of time? These recommendations, which have been recommended by a veterinarian, will make the ear-cleaning process easier.

Treating the underlying cause of your dog’s ear infections is a long-term treatment that will result in a happier and healthier life for your dog.

What are the signs of ear infections in dogs?

Because of the way a dog’s ear canal is shaped, your canine companion is more vulnerable to ear infections than a human being. Dogs who swim regularly and dogs with gorgeous floppy ears are even more susceptible to ear infections because to the moisture that gets trapped in the ear, producing an excellent habitat for germs to grow, as previously said. With a little care and attention, you can often prevent your dog from acquiring an ear infection. If your dog does acquire an infection, bringing him to the doctor as soon as possible increases the likelihood that the illness will be cleared up fast and easily.

Causes of Ear Infections in Dogs

Because of the way a dog’s ear canal is shaped, he or she is more vulnerable to ear infections than a human being. Dogs who swim regularly and dogs with gorgeous floppy ears are even more susceptible to ear infections because to the moisture that gets trapped in the ear, producing an excellent habitat for germs to grow, as previously said. However, the good news is that, with a little attention, you can often avoid your dog acquiring an ear infection. Fortunately, if your dog does become infected, he or she will have a better chance of recovering fast and easily if you take him or her to the veterinarian right away.

Types of Dog Ear Infections

There are three different forms of ear infections that may occur in dogs:

  • Otitis externa infections occur on the exterior of the ear
  • They are caused by bacteria. Otitis medium is a term used to describe an infection in the middle ear of a dog. There are several types of otitis interna, which are infections of your pet’s inner ear.

Symptoms of Ear Infections in Dogs

If your dog has gotten an ear infection, he or she is likely to be quite uncomfortable, and the ear may be really painful in some situations. If your dog exhibits any of the indications of an ear infection listed below, call your veterinarian immediately to schedule an appointment for your pet to be examined.

Early detection and treatment of ear infections can assist to avoid the development of more serious symptoms. The following are some of the most common indications of canine ear infections:

  • The act of scratching or pawing at one’s ear Redness inside the ear
  • An odor emanating from the ear
  • Yellow, brown, or bloody discharge
  • The act of scratching or pawing one’s ear Redness within the ear
  • Odor in the ear
  • Discharge that is yellow, brown, or bloody.

If your dog has a more serious ear infection, you may notice other signs and symptoms such as the ones listed below:

  • Inability to maintain balance or coordination
  • Signs of hearing impairment

Treating Your Dog’s Ear Infection

A veterinarian will examine and clean your dog’s ears with a medicated cleanser before prescribing any antibiotics or anti-inflammatory medication that will be effective in treating your dog’s ear infection. If your dog has an ear infection, the veterinarian will take the time to clean your dog’s ears with a medicated cleanser. A topical medicine may also be prescribed by the veterinarian, who will teach you on how and when to apply it to your dog’s ear at home. Uncomplicated canine ear infections usually resolve up within a week or two if identified early and treated properly, according to the manufacturer.

In many situations, more severe cases result in chronic or recurrent ear infections that last throughout the dog’s whole life.

Failure to complete prescriptions or discontinuing treatment before the illness has entirely resolved might result in a reoccurring infection that gets progressively difficult to manage.

However, even if it appears that the illness has been eradicated, there may still be residues of infection that are difficult for pet owners to detect.

Preventing Ear Infections in Dogs

Our veterinarians feel that preventing illness is always preferable to treating it. Cleaning and drying your dog’s ears regularly will help to reduce the likelihood of your dog having an ear infection in the first place. Inquire with your veterinarian about the most effective cleaning solution to use on your dog’s ears, and set aside time each week to carefully clean your pup’s ears. Please keep in mind that the information contained in this page is meant solely for educational reasons and does not represent medical advice for dogs.

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If you are the proud pet parent of a lovely puppy, you should be prepared to assist your canine friend in fighting off an ear infection at some point in the future. Why? The first difference between you and your friend is that his ear canal is primarily vertical, whereas yours is generally horizontal. Because of its vertical posture, dirt, debris, and moisture are more likely to become trapped within the ear and cause an infection to develop. Ear infections in dogs are caused by a variety of factors, and they are one of the most prevalent health concerns that may affect dogs.

Dog Ear Infections: The Basics

Otitis media, often known as ear inflammation, is the medical name for a bacterial ear infection.

Depending on whether region of your dog’s ear is infected, he or she might get one of three forms of ear infections:

  • When the outer ear canal becomes inflamed, this condition is known as Otitis Externa. Otitis Medina is a medical term that refers to inflammation of the middle ear. Otitis Interna is a dangerous infection that affects the inner ear and has the potential to cause long-term harm.

During an acute episode of Otitis Externa, the outer ear canal becomes inflamed. It is known as Otitis Medina when the middle ear becomes inflamed. Otitis Interna is a dangerous disorder that affects the inner ear and has the potential to cause long-term harm.

What Causes Dog Ear Infections?

There are a variety of reasons that might play a role in your dog’s ear infection developing. Excess hair in the ear canal, earwax accumulation, and excessive moisture are all major causes of ear infections. These factors, on the other hand, are just contributors. Typically, dog ear infections are associated with an underlying cause, such as one of the following:

  • There are a variety of reasons that might play a role in your dog acquiring an ear infection. Excess hair in the ear canal, earwax accumulation, and excessive moisture are all examples of typical causes of ear infections. This is merely a partial list of the components involved. The majority of the time, dog ear infections are caused by an underlying condition such as:

What Dogs Are at Risk?

A variety of variables might play a role in your dog acquiring an ear infection. Some of the most frequent include excessive hair in the ear canal, earwax accumulation, and excessive wetness. These factors, on the other hand, are only contributors. Typically, dog ear infections are connected to an underlying cause, such as one or more of the following:

Dog Ear Infection Symptoms

When your little companion tilts their head to the side and stares up at you with those puppy dog eyes, it’s rather endearing to witness. However, continuous head-tilting might be an indication that your pup is suffering from a canine ear infection, which is a serious condition. If your dog is constantly shaking his head, he or she may be attempting to communicate that they are in pain or discomfort. Other signs and symptoms include:

  • Scratching or scraping against hard things with excessive force
  • Overindulgence in licking, biting, or chewing on the skin
  • Around the ears, there may be redness, swelling, or an odor. discharge that is brown, yellow, or bloody
  • Hair loss, crusts, or scabs around the ears are all possible symptoms. Inability to chew
  • Aversion to eating Unusual eye movements
  • Disorientation
  • Loss of equilibrium

Remember that dog ear infections are often the consequence of a root cause as well as a number of contributing causes, all of which combine to make a very unhappy pooch. Contact your veterinarian as soon as you notice symptoms in your dog so that you can put a treatment plan in place to get your furry buddy back on his or her feet as soon as possible.

Diagnosis

Whenever you suspect an ear infection, make an appointment with your veterinarian so that they may do a complete physical examination to establish the underlying source of the problem. A veterinarian can also examine your pup’s ears for signs of self-trauma, abnormalities of the outer ear, and abnormal tissue development, all of which could indicate ear infections. Following that, the veterinarian may use an otoscope to inspect your dog’s ears. This useful equipment provides a magnified look within your friend’s ears and aids in the identification of impacted debris, ear mites, and anything else that may be creating problems.

Depending on how much pain your dog is in and how frightened they are in these situations, they may need to be sedated for this portion of the test.

Your veterinarian may prescribe allergy testing if it is thought that allergies are the cause of the problem.

If there is a possibility that your dog’s middle or inner ear is impaired, he or she may require an X-ray. In severe, long-term situations when just one ear is damaged, a tumor may be present, and your dog may require a biopsy to determine the cause of the problem.

Treatment

Due to the fact that ear infections can be caused by a multitude of factors, treatment options are numerous. In the simplest terms, bacterial illnesses necessitate the use of antibiotics, fungal infections necessitate the use of fungicides, and parasite-related diseases necessitate the use of insecticides. You and your veterinarian will collaborate on the development of a treatment plan. Because earwax and discharge might interfere with topical treatments, your pup will most likely undergo an ear cleaning while still in the veterinarian’s office.

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Regardless of whether or whether your dog’s symptoms begin to improve, it is vital that you complete the course of medicine as prescribed by your veterinarian and arrange a follow-up appointment with your veterinarian.

Home cures may be both uncomfortable and perhaps deadly in some cases.

Tips for Applying Ear Medication

While singing along to “A Spoonful of Sugar” may assist to quiet your worries, it is unlikely to aid in the effective passage of your dog’s eardrops through their ear canal and out the other side. Make sure you ask your veterinarian to do a demonstration before purchasing. You might also try some of the following helpful hints:

  1. While singing along to “A Spoonful of Sugar” may assist to soothe your worries, it is unlikely to aid in the effective passage of your dog’s eardrops through their ear tube. Remember to request a demonstration from your veterinarian. Try the following suggestions as well:

Preventing Dog Ear Infections

If your dog suffers from recurrent ear infections, consult with your veterinarian about building a long-term treatment plan that takes their history and lifestyle into consideration. The most simple form of prophylaxis for most puppies is to examine their ears on a regular basis for dirt and wax accumulation. Maintain proper moisture and ventilation in your pal’s ears at all times, paying particular attention after bathing or swimming in water. If necessary, your veterinarian can prescribe an ear-cleaning solution that contains a particular drying agent; however, never use Q-tips to administer the solution since cotton-tipped applicators can cause harm to your dog’s ears.

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How Pet Health Insurance Can Help

Discuss a long-term strategy with your veterinarian if your dog suffers from recurrent ear infections, taking their medical history and lifestyle into consideration. Checking the ears for dirt and wax accumulation on a regular basis is sufficient preventive for the majority of puppies. When your friend is bathing or swimming, be sure to keep his or her ears dry and properly aired. It may be necessary to use an ear-cleaning solution that has a particular drying agent, which your veterinarian may prescribe.

Preventative grooming, with specific attention paid to excess ear hair, can be be beneficial, but always consult your veterinarian for a demonstration or take your friend to a professional groomer before beginning.

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Ear Infections In Dogs Otitis Externa

Otitis externa is a term used to describe an infection of the external ear canal (also known as an outer ear infection). It is one of the most prevalent forms of infections encountered in dogs. Breeds that have big, floppy, or hairy ears, such as Cocker Spaniels, Miniature Poodles, or Old English Sheepdogs, tend to be more susceptible to ear infections than others, although ear infections can develop in any dog breed, regardless of its breed.

What are the symptoms of an ear infection?

Ear infections are quite uncomfortable. Many dogs may shake their heads and scratch their ears in an attempt to alleviate the discomfort they are experiencing. Ears that are hot and irritated and have an awful odor are common symptoms of this condition. It is typical to have a black or yellowish discharge. Due to the persistent inflammation, the ears may seem crusty or swollen, and the ear canals may become constricted (stenotic) as a result of the condition.

Don’t these symptoms usually indicate ear mites?

The agony associated with ear infections is excruciating. The majority of dogs will shake their heads and scratch their ears in an attempt to alleviate the pain. A red, inflamed ring around the middle ear, with an awful odor, is common. It is normal for a dark or yellowish discharge to be produced in this situation. Due to the persistent inflammation, the ears may seem crusty or swollen, and the ear canals may become constricted (stenotic) as a result of this condition.

Since these symptoms are similar and usually mean an infection, why can’t I just get some ear medication?

There are numerous different types of bacteria, as well as at least one type of fungus, that are responsible for most ear infections. In order to choose which medicine to provide, it is necessary to identify the precise type of infection that has occurred. A foreign body, a polyp, or a tumor may be the source of the disease in some instances. The use of medicine alone will not be sufficient to resolve these issues. It is critical that your dog’s eardrum be inspected to ensure that it is in good working order.

The only way to determine if this is the case is for your veterinarian to do an extensive ear examination.

How do you know which drug to use?

Before any other procedures are performed, an otoscope, a magnifying equipment with light, is used to inspect the ear canal. It is during this examination that your veterinarian can establish whether or not the eardrum is in good condition and whether or not there is any foreign material in the ear canal. Anesthesia or sedated anesthesia may be required for a comprehensive examination of a dog that is in severe discomfort and will not allow for the examination to take place. Under a microscope, a sample of the material from the ear canal will be examined in order to discover the type of organism that is causing the infection.

When your pet has a serious or persistent ear infection, culture and susceptibility tests are frequently performed to confirm that your pet is receiving the proper treatment.

How are ear infections treated?

The results of the otoscopic and microscopic examinations are used to identify the diagnosis and course of treatment in the vast majority of cases. If there is a foreign substance, wax plug, or parasite stuck in the ear canal, it will be removed during your visit with us. Some dogs will need to be sedated for this, as well as to allow for a complete flushing and cleaning of the ears. Many dogs will be infected with more than one sort of illness at the same time (e.g., a bacterium and a fungus, or two kinds of bacteria).

“Allergies and poor thyroid function (hypothyroidism) are common in dogs that have chronic or recurring ear infections,” says the veterinarian.

Many dogs with chronic or recurring ear infections have allergies or have poor thyroid function, which can make the problem worse (hypothyroidism).

What is the prognosis?

Almost all ear infections, provided they are correctly detected and treated, may be managed effectively. The outcome, on the other hand, will be less favorable if the underlying reason is not recognized and addressed in due course. It is possible that several recheck tests may be required before a favorable outcome is achieved.

How important is it to treat an ear infection?

Dogs suffering from ear infections are in discomfort. Their ears are a persistent source of discomfort, and they regularly scratch them and shake their heads in frustration. When this happens, it can result in a condition known as a “aural hematoma,” in which blood vessels in the ear flap burst and produce a painful swelling that requires surgical intervention to correct. Ear infections that are deep in the eardrum can cause damage or rupture, which can result in an internal ear infection and perhaps irreversible hearing loss.

My dog’s ear canal is nearly closed. Is that a problem?

Another complication of a persistent ear infection is the narrowing of the ear canal. This condition is referred to as hyperplasia or stenosis. If the ear canal is enlarged, drugs will have a tough time getting into the horizontal canal and will not work. In certain dogs, anti-inflammatory drugs can help to reduce the swollen tissues and allow the canal to open more easily. The majority of instances with hyperplasia will eventually necessitate surgical intervention.

What is the goal of ear canal surgery?

Treatment for this condition can be accomplished through a variety of surgical methods. The alateral ear excision procedure is the most often done surgical procedure. Aims of the procedure include removal of the vertical portion of the ear canal as well as removal of swollen tissue from the horizontal portion of the canal. Removing tissue from the vertical canal is very straightforward; however, removing substantial volumes of tissue from the horizontal canal is more challenging.

Total ear canal ablation is a surgical procedure that is performed when it is required to remove the entire ear canal, which may result in a permanent loss of hearing. For more information on this procedure, please see the brochure “Total Ear Canal Ablation and Bulla Osteotomy (TECA-BO).”

Is there anything I need to know about administering medication in the ear?

“It’s critical to get the drug into the horizontal portion of the ear canal,” says the doctor. It is critical to provide the medicine through the horizontal portion of the ear canal (see above diagram). It is the dog’s external ear canal that is L-shaped, as opposed to our own. The vertical canal links the exterior of the ear to the inside of the ear and is the top portion of the letter ‘L.’ This canal is deeper in the canal than the vertical canal and finishes at the eardrum. To do this, the drug must be administered into the bottom portion of the letter “L” – the horizontal ear canal.

  1. Getting the drug into the horizontal area of the ear canal is critical, according to the doctor. It is critical to get the drug to the horizontal portion of the ear canal (see above diagram). The dog’s external ear canal is L-shaped, in contrast to our own. The vertical canal, which links the outside of the ear with the inside of the ear, is the top portion of the letter ‘L.’ It is also known as the external canal. Located further in the canal and terminating at the eardrum, the horizontal canal can be found. To do this, the drug must be administered into the bottom portion of the letter “L,” which represents the horizontal ear canal. Following these instructions will allow you to medicate your ear canal: a.

If a second drug is required, it should be administered in the same manner. Generally speaking, you should wait 5-30 minutes before applying any additional medications to your skin. To ensure that any ear medicine or cleansing agents are used properly, see your veterinarian for precise instructions. When cleaning the ear canal, avoid using cotton tipped applicators (Q-Tips) since they have a tendency to push dirt back into the vertical ear canal. When all meds have been applied, use a cotton ball soaked in some of the medication to wipe the outside section of the ear canal and the inside of the earflap after they have been applied.

Inner Ear Infection Otitis Interna In Dogs

Otitis interna is a term used to describe an inflammation of the inner ear that is most typically caused by an infection. It is most often bacteria that cause inner ear infections, although it is also possible that fungus (sometimes known as yeast) is responsible for the illness. If your dog has ear mites in the external ear canal, this can eventually cause a problem in the inner ear and increase the chance of contracting a bacterial infection in the process. In a similar vein, inner ear infections can arise if a diseased ear canal is present, or if a benign polyp is developing from the middle ear and becomes infected.

Are some dogs more susceptible to inner ear infection?

An infection is the most common cause of otitis interna, which is an inflammation of the inner ear canal. It is most often bacteria that cause inner ear infections, but it is also possible that fungus (sometimes known as yeast) is to blame for the condition. The presence of ear mites in the external ear canal can eventually lead to a problem in the inner ear, increasing the likelihood of a bacterial infection in your dog’s ears. Inner ear infections can also occur if a diseased ear canal is present, or if a benign polyp is developing from the middle ear, for example.

What are the signs of an inner ear infection?

Acute otitis interna manifests itself in a variety of ways depending on how severe and widespread the infection is. Some dogs may not show any visible indicators at all, but you may notice that your dog is reluctant to chew or appears to be in discomfort while opening his mouth when you examine him. He may shake his head or paw at the ear that is bothering him. In addition to a head tilt, which is generally to the side of the infected ear, your dog could lean, tumble, or roll toward the affected ear if the infection is severe enough.

It is possible that he will swing his head from side to side like an elephant swinging its trunk if both ears are affected, and he may have difficulty keeping on his feet. Furthermore, dogs suffering with active otitis interna are unable to hear on the afflicted side (s).

Are there other signs I should watch for?

Urinary retention, vomiting, and nausea are common during the acute phase of otitis interna. If your dog’s facial nerve, which is located in the area of the inner ear, is destroyed as a result of an inner ear infection, he or she may exhibit any of the following signs and symptoms:

  • During the acute phase of otitis interna, vomiting and nausea are possible. If an inner ear infection causes damage to the facial nerve, which is located in the region of the inner ear, your dog may exhibit any of the following symptoms:

When a patient has long-term facial nerve paralysis, the face may actually twist to the side of the ear infection that is being treated. Additional indications and symptoms include redness in the afflicted ear as well as discharge that has a bad smell. Chronic inflammation of the outer ear canal may cause it to thicken and become hard to the touch, and the lymph node at the base of the chin on the afflicted side may grow. You may notice that your dog is hesitant to move at all, preferring to sit or sleep in one place, and that his head is swinging from side to side even when he is at rest.

How is otitis interna treated?

Otitis interna is a highly dangerous illness that requires immediate medical attention. If your dog is unable to eat or drink regularly due to nausea or disorientation, he or she should be admitted to the hospital for intravenous fluid treatment, which is usually necessary. It is essential to keep nausea under control and to avoid dehydration. Depending on the situation, it may also be essential to sedate or anesthetize your dog in order to properly examine the ear tissues, collect samples for bacterial culture, and clean the ear properly.

  1. Oral and direct administration of medications will be used to treat the patient.
  2. If the infection is of a fungal type, an anti-fungal medicine (most often itraconazole) will be administered to treat it.
  3. “If your dog has a problem with his balance, limit his activities while he is receiving therapy to avoid falling injuries.” If your dog has a problem with his balance, you should limit his activities while he is receiving therapy to avoid falling injuries.
  4. It is also possible that you may have to hand feed your dog for a period of time because reaching down into a dish may cause nausea.
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When a dog has fluid buildup in the middle ear, an infection of the bone around his ear (known as osteomyelitis), or a lump (either benign or malignant tumor) that comes from the middle ear or theeustachian tube, surgery is the only option (the tube leading from the middle ear to the back of the mouth).

Please refer to the brochure “Total Ear Canal Ablation and Bulla Osteotomy (TECA-BO)” for further information on this procedure. In the case of otitis interna, the severity of the nervous system indications associated with the condition does not decide whether surgery is required.

Are there any potential complications or long-term effects of otitis interna?

When a serious inner ear infection occurs, it may extend to the area of your dog’s nervous system that regulates his breathing and heart rate, although this is quite uncommon. Long-term effects of inner ear infection include a permanently impaired sense of balance and/or chronic evidence of Horner’s syndrome, to name a few examples. Your dog may possibly go deaf in the damaged ear for the rest of his or her life. Having said that, the majority of dogs suffering with otitis interna react well to medical treatment.

The impaired sensation of balance that is commonly associated with otitis interna usually improves within two to six weeks after the onset of the condition.

Signs And Symptoms Of Pet Ear Infections

When a serious inner ear infection occurs, it may extend to the area of your dog’s nervous system that regulates his breathing and heart rate, but this is quite unusual. Long-term effects of inner ear infection include a permanently impaired sense of balance and/or chronic symptoms of Horner’s syndrome, to name a few. Depending on the severity of the injury, your dog may go deaf in the afflicted ear for the rest of his life. The good news is that, in the majority of cases, medical treatment is effective.

Most people notice an improvement in their feeling of balance between two to six weeks after they have had otitis interna.

Causes of pet ear infections

Specifically, some breeds, particularly those with floppy or hairy ears such as Cocker Spaniels, Poodles, and Golden Retrievers, may be more susceptible to ear infections than others. They, on the other hand, can arise in any breed. Ears that are in good health are normally pink, clean, and have a faint scent. A pet suffering from an ear infection may exhibit a variety of signs and symptoms.

Symptoms of an ear infection

  • Inflammation of the ears, with a black/brown or yellow/green discharge visible
  • Strong odor
  • Frequent ear scratching or shaking of the head
  • Swelling surrounding the ear
  • Crying as a result of discomfort

Or more seriously

  • Loss of balance, hearing loss, odd eye movements, walking in circles, or head tilting are all signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

Ears are extremely sensitive organs. If you believe your pet may be suffering from a medical condition, please call your nearest Greencross Vet. It is important to get your pet’s ears inspected by a veterinarian so that they may evaluate whether the eardrum is intact and whether any foreign items are present in the ear canal. A sample for additional tests can also be obtained by veterinarians. Your veterinarian will determine the source of the problem and prescribe the most effective therapy and home care plan to tackle the ailment and restore your pet to peak physical condition.

How are pet ear infections diagnosed?

A thorough clinical examination, which includes examining your pet’s skin and assessing the ear drum to ensure it is in good working order, as well as taking a small sample of the ear contents and examining them under a microscope, will allow your veterinarian to determine the cause of your pet’s ear infection.

Pets suffering from severe pain who refuse to cooperate with the inspection may require sedated or anesthetized treatment in order for the veterinarian to conduct a more comprehensive examination and diagnosis.

How are ear infections treated?

In many circumstances, ear drops can be given to the afflicted ear to alleviate the discomfort. If there is foreign matter or excessive discharge in the ear canal, the pet may need to be sedated or anaesthetized in order for it to be removed before the ear drops can be applied. It is possible to be diagnosed with more than one form of infection, which may necessitate the administration of various drugs. Based on the diagnosis, your veterinarian will propose a treatment plan that is specific to your pet.

Aftercare at home

  • Observe the medication instructions that have been provided by your veterinarian. Medications were only taken as prescribed by your veterinarian. Avoid getting the ears wet – no swimming, and only a moist towel should be used to wash the head

Preventing a re-occurrence

  • If possible, please adhere to all veterinarian home care recommendations until they are completed. Regularly inspect the ears of your pet
  • Please schedule an appointment with your veterinarian if you detect any reoccurring symptoms.

Please keep in mind that all breeds of dogs and cats are vulnerable to developing ear infections. Keep a close eye out for any indications of pain, discharge, redness, or scent coming from your pet’s ear canals. If you feel that your pet may be suffering from an ear infection or discomfort, call your local Greencross Vet for more guidance.

7 Signs Your Dog Could Have an Ear Infection

Always keep in mind that ear infections can affect any breed of dog or cat. You should keep a close eye out for your pet’s ears if there is any pain, discharge, redness, or foul smell coming from them. If you feel that your pet may be suffering from an ear infection or irritation, call your local Greencross Vet for further information.

What you need to know about dog ear infections

One or both ears may be affected by a dog ear infection, and they may manifest themselves in various sections of the ear, which will alter the types of signs and signs that your dog exhibits. According to VetOrganics, the most common type of ear infection is otitis externa, which is an inflammation of the exterior section of the ear canal. However, if you don’t take care of the problem right once, the infection may spread to other areas of the ear and become more severe. It should come as no surprise that otitis media is an infection of the middle ear, and that otitis interna is an infection of the inner ear (it can also be called labyrinthitis).

Photograph courtesy of Sergey Lavrentev/Shutterstock

What types of dogs get ear infections the most?

Having long, floppy ears may put your dog at greater risk for ear infections, since their ears are more likely to retain dirt and moisture, resulting in an environment that is a breeding ground for germs. Maintaining your dog’s ears on a regular basis might assist him prevent developing an ear infection; here’s how often you should be cleaning his ears. Dogs with allergies, as well as those that spend a lot of time in the water, are more prone to have ear infections than other dogs. Ear infections, on the other hand, can affect any dog.

Cleaning your dog’s ears will help prevent him from having an ear infection; here’s how often you should be cleaning your dog’s ears: once a week In addition, dogs that suffer from allergies and those who spend a lot of time in the water have an increased risk of developing ear infections.

The virus can affect any dog, regardless of their breed. Following are the dog breeds that are most prone to ear infections, according to Hannie Elfenbein, DVM.

What causes ear infections in dogs?

Having long, floppy ears may put your dog at greater risk for ear infections, since their ears are more likely to retain dirt and moisture, resulting in an ideal breeding ground for germs. Cleaning your dog’s ears will assist him prevent developing an ear infection; here’s how often you should be cleaning his ears. Dogs with allergies, as well as those that spend a lot of time in the water, are more prone to ear infections. However, every dog is susceptible to developing an ear infection. According to Hannie Elfenbein, DVM, the dog breeds that are most susceptible to ear infections are as follows:

Sign: Your dog shakes his head—a lot

If your dog is vigorously shaking his head from side to side, he is not attempting to communicate a negative response. He may, on the other hand, be attempting to communicate with you that he has an ear infection. “Ear infections itch like crazy. Dr. Wilde says that one of the ways your dog attempts to communicate with you is by shaking his or her head. Your dog’s method of scratching an itch is to shake his head. The presence of this symptom in dogs might also indicate the presence of other ear disorders, such as an ear hematoma or an ear vasculitis.

Don’t make the mistake of confusing head shaking with head tilting.

Photograph by Kanchana Tuihun/Shutterstock

Sign: Scratching her ears

The fact that scratching is another typical symptom of a dog ear infection is not surprising, given how irritating the condition may be. It is possible that your dog will scratch at his or her ears, head, or other regions of their body in an attempt to find the cause of the itch. Another symptom that can occur as a result of overly-long or overly-sharp doggie nails is open sores on the skin. “The itching associated with ear infections can be severe enough to cause sores in and around the ears,” says Jennifer Coates, DVM, a member of the Pet Life Today advisory board.

Sign: Sliding his head on the rug

Since dog ear infections may be quite irritating, it should come as no surprise that scratching is a typical symptom. Your dog may scratch at his or her ears, head, and other regions of their body in an attempt to find the cause of the itch. In addition, very long or overly sharp doggie nails can cause open sores, which can be painful. According to Jennifer Coates, DVM, who serves on the advisory board of Pet Life Today, “ear infections can cause acute itching that might result in sores in and around the ears.” Zoonar GmbH and Shutterstock are credited with this image.

Sign: Smelly ears

Infections like as fungal or bacterial infections, dead skin cell buildup, and ear wax buildup are all potential causes of a foul odor emanating from your dog’s ears. If your dog’s ears are long and floppy, you may not detect the odor until you pull them up and take a whiff from behind them.

Ear infections can have an unpleasant smell that can be yeasty, wet earthy, or even vinegary in flavor at times. According to Pet MD, ear odor in and of itself does not always indicate the existence of an ear infection. Rather, it is a symptom of an ear infection. fongleon356/Shutterstock

Sign: Icky ear discharge

If your dog has an ear infection, fluid may begin to flow from his or her ears. If you carefully wipe part of the discharge out of the ear canal, the discharge may not be visible at all other times (a job best left to a veterinarian, to avoid damaging the ear canal). Typically, the discharge from yeast infections is brownish/blackish in appearance. “The color of the discharge can range from yellow to dark when it is caused by bacterial illnesses,” says Dr. Wilde. In the case of dogs, “if you look down into the ear, it may appear to be packed with black or colorful waxy material,” notes Sara D.

What ever the reason, the discharge associated with a canine ear infection will serve as a reservoir for any odor that may develop.

Kittima05/Shutterstock

Sign: Inflammation and swelling

An ear infection in any part of the dog’s ear can cause a bright red, furious, and inflamed appearance on the inside of the dog’s ear. Additionally, it may seem enlarged. Your dog should be taken to the veterinarian as soon as possible if her ears appear to be inflamed and painful. Photograph courtesy of Mary Swift/Shutterstock

Sign: She’s clearly in pain

An ear infection in a dog can be painful as well as itchy. Depending on where the issue is located (inner or middle ear), your dog may have discomfort across the entire ear or head. Until you try to stroke his ears or embrace him, you may not understand that your faithful companion is in agony until you hear a yelp—or worse, receive a nip—from your loyal friend. It is possible that your heart will be damaged more more than your hand, but it does happen. Even the most docile dog might become agitated and snap at their owner if they are in pain and the region that is causing them discomfort is accidently handled or jabbed.

Andrey Popov/Shutterstock

A serious condition to look out for

If left untreated, ear infections in dogs can worsen, becoming extremely painful and debilitating. For this reason, you should schedule an appointment with your veterinarian as soon as you see any signs of a canine ear infection. “Dogs have a very different ear canal than humans, which makes them extremely susceptible to ear infections—to the point where ear issues are among the top five health conditions seen by veterinarians in the United States,” explains Danielle Bernal, DVM, a veterinarian withWellness Natural Pet Food.

“Because the underlying reasons differ from one dog to the next, the clinical manifestations may also differ.” Ear infections might become more severe if they are not treated promptly.

“ Aural hematomas are extremely painful and should be treated by a veterinarian as soon as possible.” Photograph courtesy of Rodion Grekov/Shutterstock

Symptoms of a severe dog ear infection

Untreated ear infections can give your dog a great deal of pain and discomfort. In accordance with WebMD, symptoms that must be addressed right once include nausea, wandering in circles, a reluctance to open the mouth, and difficulty or issues with balance and standing. Photograph by Khomkrit Songsiriwith/Shutterstock.

Shutting it down before it starts

Maintaining the cleanliness of your dog’s ears is the most effective method of preventing him from developing an ear infection in the first place. Depending on your situation, your veterinarian may recommend that you use ear wash. Also, check your dog’s ears at least once a week for any signs or symptoms of infection to ensure they are not infected. This is especially critical if your dog’s ears are long and floppy like mine. Also, make sure that your dog’s ears are always kept dry at all times.

Never, ever use a cotton swab to clean your dog’s ears because you might damage his eardrum.

Date of Original Publication: June 06, 2019

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