How To Give A Dog Cpr? (Solution found)

Cover your pet’s nose with your mouth and exhale until you see the pet’s chest rise. Give a second rescue breath. Continue giving CPR with a cycle of 30 chest compressions and 2 rescue breaths until your dog or cat begins breathing again on its own. Briefly check for breathing and a heartbeat every 2 minutes.

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What side do you lay a dog on for CPR?

If the dog is breathing, CPR is not necessary. Lay the dog on their right side, push the front elbow back to the chest. The spot where the elbow touches the chest is called the intercostal space and marks where the heart is located.

What do I do if my dog stops breathing?

Perform rescue breathing by closing your pet’s mouth and breathing with your mouth directly into its nose until you see its chest expand. Once the chest expands, continue the rescue breathing once every 5 seconds. If your pet doesn’t regain consciousness take them to the vet.

Should you resuscitate a dog?

Young animals that experience cardiac arrest while under anesthesia have the best chance of recovery. While only about 5% of pets who experience cardiac and/or respiratory arrest survive, it is always worth trying to revive a patient. However, do not feel bad if you answer “ no ” to resuscitation.

Can you call 911 for a dog?

Can you call 911 for your dog or other pet? 911 is reserved for human emergencies. It is not advised for you to call 911 if your pet is having an emergency. You should contact your vet or the nearest emergency animal hospital for these types of emergencies.

How do you give a small dog CPR?

Cover your pet’s nose with your mouth and exhale until you see the pet’s chest rise. Give a second rescue breath. Continue giving CPR with a cycle of 30 chest compressions and 2 rescue breaths until your dog or cat begins breathing again on its own. Briefly check for breathing and a heartbeat every 2 minutes.

How successful is dog CPR?

Less than 6 percent of dogs and cats that experience cardiopulmonary arrest in the hospital survive to discharge, while the survival rate is about 20 percent for humans that experience in-hospital cardiac arrest.

Does blowing in a dogs nose hurt them?

Blowing air into a dog’s face may just seem like some mindless fun, but dogs hate it. If you think about it, do you ever blow another person’s face for fun? Even when you try to tease a baby with this they will be irritated. Although this won’t necessarily hurt them, the shock of the sensation is not pleasant to them.

How long can a dog stop breathing for?

Generally speaking, a dog cannot survive if the brain and other organs are deprived of oxygen for more than about four to six minutes. Sadly, the chance of successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation after cardiac arrest is low.

How can you tell if a dog can’t breathe?

Signs of Difficult or Labored Breathing

  1. Open mouth breathing.
  2. Abdomen heaves with every breath.
  3. Fast and short breaths (hyperventilating)
  4. Breathing is noisy (raspy or congested)
  5. Nostrils flare open when breathing.
  6. Gum color is grey or blue instead of pink.
  7. Tongue is blue or purple instead of pink.

Can I call 911 if my dog stops breathing?

Gladstein said don’t call them for pets. “ Call your vet ASAP. Just remember that with 911, your pet may not be their first priority. Ask them how long until someone can come.

How do you save a dying dog?

End-of-Life Care: How to Make Your Dog’s Last Days Comfortable

  1. Keep him warm.
  2. Make sure he has palatable food, such as canned food or some plain cooked chicken mixed in with his kibble.
  3. Keep him company or leave him alone depending on his preferences.

How much does it cost to resuscitate a dog?

CPR for pets can cost anywhere from $200 to $600, or more, depending on circumstances. For some folks, this effort for something that has such a dismal chance may not be realistic. The other reason CPR is something to consider not doing is that it might give false hope.

How can I bring my dog back to life?

How do you comfort a dying dog?

  1. Stay Close to Them. Many dogs will seek comfort during this time and may desire more attention and care. …
  2. Don’t Introduce Your Dog to New People or Places. …
  3. Maintain Normal Activities as Long as Your Dog Is Able. …
  4. Talk to Your Vet If Medication Is Needed.

Everything You Need to Know About Dog CPR

Following the death of your dog, you must follow a set of measures. Image courtesy of: oceane2508/iStock/Getty Images. When your companion dog dies, it may be a distressing experience that leaves you feeling overwhelmed when it comes to deciding what to do with his or her remains. Make certain that you have the emotional support you require before entering work mode. Obtain the assistance of a friend or family member to accompany you and share their insight while you make decisions on what to do with your pet’s body.

Explain to small children that the pet’s body is no longer capable of moving, eating, peeing, or playing, and that the pet’s body will no longer function.

Large dogs should be placed on a blanket that will be easy to dispose of, with a tarp placed below.

Place an additional blanket over your dog’s head and ice packs on top of it during warm weather.

  1. It is a good idea to consult with your veterinarian about your choices when it comes to burial or cremation.
  2. Several veterinarians have access to crematory facilities, and you may be able to pick up your pet’s cremains at the time of his or her death.
  3. Many veterinarians offer post-mortem services whether or not your pet was a regular patient at their clinic or hospital.
  4. The cause of your pet’s death may be of interest if it occurred abruptly and unexpectedly.
  5. This procedure involves surgically opening your pet’s body and inspecting his inside organs.
  6. Choosing a cosmetic necropsy for your dog’s burial is a good option if you want to keep the procedure as painless as possible.
  7. Refrigerate your dog’s body if a delay is essential; however, do not freeze it since ice crystals can cause tissue damage.
  8. To be sure that burial a pet on your property is permissible, check with your local authorities.
  9. You can also arrange for your dog to be cremated by bringing him to an animal control facility.

For a small or no fee, some municipalities will take up dead animals from the street or from a cemetery. Prior to making any dietary, medication, or physical activity changes for your pet, always consult your veterinarian. If you have any questions about your pet, please consult with a vet.

What is Dog CPR?

In the same way that CPR is performed on humans in an emergency, dog CPR is a life-saving method that employs artificial respiration and chest compressions to help resuscitate a dog who is not breathing or does not have a heart beat. When a dog’s heart stops beating or their breathing ceases, the oxygen levels in their blood decrease quickly, just like they do in humans. The kidney, liver, and other important organs might fail if they do not receive enough oxygen. When respiratory failure occurs, it is possible that brain damage will occur as well, making it critical to respond immediately and effectively when a puppy buddy is in danger.

Different First Response Maneuvers

In an ideal case, the first responder to any emergency situation is a medical expert who is equipped with the necessary equipment, such as an oxygen tank and mask, to cope with the issue. Emergency situations, on the other hand, being what they are, rarely occur in the ideal circumstance or setting. Occasionally, the first person to arrive on the scene of an emergency is not a fireman or a veterinarian. You should contact a veterinarian or an emergency animal hospital promptly if you ever find yourself in the situation of being the initial response to a dog’s medical emergency.

  1. If you know how to do CPR on a dog, you will be more equipped to deal with any emergency scenarios that may arise.
  2. A.
  3. B.
  4. Before doing CPR on a dog, it is critical to ensure that the airway is clean.
  5. Check to see if the dog is breathing properly.
  6. You can feel for airflow by placing your face near the dog’s nose if you are unable to determine whether or not the dog is breathing based on chest movement.
  7. The use of CPR is not essential if the dog is breathing.
  8. Listen for the presence of a heartbeat.
  9. The intercostal space is defined as the area where the elbow contacts the chest and indicates the location of the heart in the body.

Heimlich Maneuver on Dogs

It may be necessary to conduct a modified version of the Heimlich technique if a dog’s airway becomes clogged as a result of the obstruction. Some blockages may be removed manually, but it’s important not to push the object farther down the dog’s throat while you’re working. Other stumbling blocks will be out of reach and will necessitate a different strategy.

Place your hands on each side of the dog’s rib cage and apply pressure in order to conduct the Heimlich technique on him. Once the foreign item has been removed, and if the dog is still not breathing, you can proceed with CPR as necessary.

How to do CPR on a Dog

Performing a modified version of the Heimlich technique may be necessary in the case of a dog who is not breathing owing to a clogged airway. While it is possible to physically remove certain blockages, it is important not to push the object even deeper down the dog’s throat. Several other obstructions will be inaccessible and will require a different strategy to overcome. Placing your hands on each side of a dog’s rib cage and applying pressure is how to conduct the Heimlich technique on them.

Signs Your Dog May Need Emergency Care

There are a variety of situations in which you may need to seek emergency care for your dog, ranging from choking to heatstroke. While the majority of pet parents can tell when their dog is sick or wounded straight immediately, there are several extra indicators to look out for when assessing whether or not your canine friend need emergency medical attention:

  • Pale gums, rapid breathing, a weak or high pulse, a rise in body temperature, difficulty standing, apparent paralysis, loss of consciousness, and seizures
  • Excessive bleeding
  • Aggressive conduct that is out of the ordinary

If your dog exhibits any of these behaviors, it’s critical that you seek them medical attention as soon as possible to avoid additional injury to your companion or yourself. Transporting your dog to the doctor is a good idea if you are comfortable and capable of doing so. Get them there as fast and safely as possible. If your dog appears anxious or agitated, it is essential to get professional assistance to avoid future complications.

Basic First-Aid at Home

In the event that your dog exhibits any of these behaviors, it’s critical that you seek therapy for them without endangering your friend or yourself. Transporting your dog to the doctor is a good idea if you are comfortable and capable of doing so. Get them there as soon and safely as possible. To avoid any more problems with your dog, it is advisable to seek professional assistance immediately.

  • External bleeding should be treated by applying pressure to the wound and elevating the injured area. Heatstroke – Move your dog to a shady spot and apply cool cloths to their neck and head to prevent heatstroke. You may also run cool water over their bodies, focusing on their midsection, between their rear legs, and the pads of their feet
  • This can help to relieve stress. For unintentional exposure to dangerous materials, follow the recommendations on the product label for treating your dog’s skin irritation. For poisoning, see your veterinarian. To be safe, if your dog’s eyes have been exposed to a potentially harmful substance, be sure to call your veterinarian after doing any at-home decontamination treatments — just to be sure. As soon as you discover that your dog has consumed a potentially toxic substance, gather all pertinent information, including the product in issue and anything else your dog may have chewed on, and take him to the veterinarian right away
  • Seizures-Keep your dog away from any object that might do them injury, but do not confine them if they are experiencing one. Immediately following the seizure’s cessation, keep your dog warm and calm
  • Keeping your dog warm and calm during a period of shock is essential. Keeping the dog’s head level with the rest of the body is important if he is unconscious.

When it comes to medical problems and difficulties with your dog, it is critical that your dog sees a veterinarian as soon as possible. Get your dog to the veterinarian as soon as possible once you’ve been able to get the situation under control or, at the at least, transport him to the veterinarian for an evaluation and, in many circumstances, subsequent treatment. Do you want to put together your own pet first-aid kit? Check out the following for further information on what you should include:

Have a Plan

It’s never fun to think about emergency circumstances, especially when they include your dog, but it’s necessary to do so. Even so, it is a good idea to have a game plan in place in case anything unexpected arises. Consult with your dog’s veterinarian on what to do in the event of an unexpected medical situation. Accidents happen, and while they are terrible and hard to forecast, they do happen. It is important to be prepared to move quickly and, ideally, see a positive outcome come out of a bad circumstance when they occur.

The material contained in this article is intended solely for educational and informative reasons and should not be construed as a substitute for professional advice from your veterinarian in any way.

CPR For Dogs: A Step-By-Step Guide To Saving Your Dog’s Life

The thought of an emergency scenario, especially one involving your dog, is never pleasant to contemplate, but it is necessary. Even yet, it is a good idea to have a strategy in place in case anything unexpected occurs. Ask the veterinarian about what you should do in the event of an emergency with your canine companion. However sad and unpredictable accidents may be, they do happen, and it is important to be prepared to respond quickly and, perhaps, see a positive outcome come out of an awful circumstance.

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The material contained in this article is intended solely for educational and informative reasons and should not be construed as a substitute for professional advice from your veterinarian.

Evaluate Their Condition

Before you do anything, you must first assess the situation with your dog in order to determine what to do next. When dealing with an emergency scenario, time is of the importance, so make sure you complete these evaluations as soon as feasible.

Is Your Dog Breathing?

  • In order to know what to do, you must first assess the situation surrounding your dog. Performing these evaluations as rapidly as feasible in an emergency scenario is critical since time is of the essence.
  • Start by inspecting their airway to see if there is any obstruction. Attempt to gently remove any foreign items from the throat or mouth by pulling the tongue forward as far as it will go
  • If your dog responds negatively to you attempting to remove the object, stop immediately to avoid getting bitten yourself. Performing CPR on your dog will be necessary if he does not react immediately.

Does Your Dog Have A Pulse?

  • The femoral artery, which is located on the inside of the thigh, is the most convenient location to locate your dog’s pulse. Keep going along the inside of the hind leg until you are close to the spot where it meets the body with your hand. There should be a little dip where the femoral artery is closest to the skin, which you should notice. In order to feel for a pulse, use your fingers (not your thumb) to gently push down on the area
  • Try immediately above the metacarpal pad (the large, middle pad) of your dog’s front paw, or directly on top of the heart, if you are unable to feel the pulse at the femoral artery
  • If this does not work, try directly on top of the heart. Located on the left side of your dog’s chest, its heart is a muscular organ. If you can’t discover it, lie your dog on his right side and bend the front left leg so that the elbow rests on his chest. The heart is located at the place where the elbow comes into contact with the chest wall.

If your dog has a pulse but is not breathing, you can provide artificial respiration to help him breathe again (Skip down to Step 4 below). If your dog does not have a pulse, you will need to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which is a mix of artificial breathing and compressions of the chest.

How To Do CPR On A Dog

It is critical that you do not do CPR on a healthy dog. If conducted unnecessarily, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can cause substantial bodily injury to dogs. You may not need to do CPR on your dog if he or she exhibits any symptoms of resistance while you are doing so. Even in a hospital with highly trained experts, the success rate for CPR is poor. As a result, contact and initiate transport to the nearest vet facility as soon as possible; do not waste time doing CPR on your own.

1. Position Your Dog For Treatment

  • Your dog should be laid down with their left or right side facing up on a sturdy, level surface. For dogs with barrel chests, such as Bulldogs, you can put your dog on their back
  • However, this is not recommended. Straighten their head and neck as far as you can to provide a clear path for their airway to flow through
  • Pulling the tongue forward so that it rests on the back of their teeth and closing their mouth will help them relax. Put yourself in a position behind their back. You have the option of kneeling or standing.

2. Find The Heart And Prep For Compressions

  • Place both of your palms, one on top of the other with fingers intertwined, on top of the largest section of your rib cage, near the heart but not exactly over it*. To restrain smaller dogs weighing less than 30lbs (13.6kg), cup your hands over their rib cage, placing your fingers on one side of the dog’s chest and your thumb on the other.

3. Begin Compressions

  • With your elbows straight and your shoulders precisely above your hands, squeeze the rib cage with firm, rapid compressions while maintaining your posture. Only compress 1/4 to 1/3 of the chest breadth at a time
  • Repeat compressions at a rapid rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute*. To compress the chest of a smaller dog, use your thumbs and index fingers to squeeze the chest to roughly a quarter or third of its breadth. Repeat this at a little faster speed than you would with larger dogs, aiming for 17 compressions in 10 seconds or less.

Firm, fast compressions of the rib cage should be applied while keeping both elbows straight and shoulders immediately above your hands. Only compress 1/4 to 1/3 of the chest breadth at a time; repeat compressions at a rapid rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute*; Using your thumb and fingers, squeeze the chest of a smaller dog’s chest to around one-quarter to one-third of its whole length. Keep doing this at a slightly faster speed than with the bigger dogs, aiming for 17 compressions in 10 seconds.

4. Begin Artificial Respiration

Firm, fast compressions of the rib cage should be performed while keeping both elbows straight and shoulders immediately above your hands. Only compress 1/4 to 1/3 of the chest breadth; repeat compressions at a rapid rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute. For smaller dogs, use your thumb and index finger to push the chest down to approximately a quarter or a third of its original size. Repeat this at a slightly faster speed than for larger dogs, aiming for 17 compressions in 10 seconds.

  • Firm, fast compressions of the rib cage should be performed while keeping your elbows straight and your shoulders immediately above your hands. Only compress 1/4 to 1/3 of the chest breadth
  • Repeat compressions at a rapid rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute*. For smaller dogs, use your thumb and index finger to compress the chest to roughly a quarter or a third of its breadth. Repeat this at a little faster speed than you would for a larger dog, aiming for 17 compressions in 10 seconds.

For simple artificial respiration, follow the same process as described above for closing your dog’s mouth, and provide one breath every two to three seconds at a consistent rate of 20 to 30 breaths per minute.

5. Administer An Abdominal Squeeze

  • Your left hand should be placed beneath your dog’s midsection, and your right hand should be on top. Make a downward pressure on your tummy to compress it and aid in the circulation of blood back to your heart. Each round of 30 compressions and two breaths should be followed up with one abdominal squeeze.

6. Repeat

If your dog is not reacting after 1 to 2 minutes, check in with them every 1 to 2 minutes. Carry on with CPR or artificial respiration until the dog is able to breathe on its own and has returned to having a stable pulse. If the dog is not breathing after 20 minutes, it is time to consider stopping the therapy because it is unlikely that you will be successful after this point in the treatment.

Pet Ambulance Options

If you have someone else with you at the time of your dog’s emergency, you can ask them to look for a pet ambulance on the internet. Pet ambulance services are available in several cities and states to help raise the odds of a pet’s survival in an emergency situation. A person accompanying you should phone your veterinarian or emergency veterinarian if there are no ambulances accessible in your area. This will provide you with input on the best course of action. When in doubt, should you try to transport the dog into the back of your automobile while you perform CPR at your current location?

Precautions

CPR is a physically demanding technique that, if carried out incorrectly, can result in further harm to your dog’s body. Injuries such as fractured ribs, pneumothorax (commonly known as a collapsed lung), and general stress to your dog’s body might result from these incidents. Due to the fact that these injuries are treated by a veterinarian, it is not essential to interrupt CPR for fear of further injuring your pet. If you feel that you may have fractured a rib or otherwise damaged your dog, simply continue with milder compressions until the problem is resolved.

However, it is essential that you understand some of the fundamentals of the procedures so that you will be prepared to do them in the event that your dog is faced with a life-threatening circumstance.

In addition, have a list of area emergency veterinary clinics in a readily accessible location in your house or on your phone for easy access.

Classes And Training

A variety of training alternatives are available, whether you prefer hands-on instruction or more in-depth video demonstrations.

  • Examine dog CPR videos such as this one, in which Elaine Acker, CEO of Pets America, explains CPR for dogs in great detail
  • And
  • Take a canine CPR course. Many pet-related businesses provide courses in pet first aid, including dog CPR, to its customers. Pet Tech may be able to provide an 8-hour training in your region that is given by a trained teacher and that covers a range of first aid techniques. Upon completion of the program, participants will get a certificate. The Red Cross also provides courses, many of which are available online and are completely free. Speak with your veterinarian about it. At your next checkup, request that your veterinarian go over your dog’s pulse points and explain emergency procedures that are appropriate for your dog’s breed, size, and weight.

Additional Pet Safety Prep Tips

Preparation might be the difference between saving your dog’s life and running out of time when an emergency situation arises. Keep this advice on hand and pass it along to other dog owners to guarantee that every dog gets the opportunity to enjoy a second day. It is also critical to be prepared in the event that an emergency situation arises. For pet owners, here’s a great disaster preparedness guide, and be sure to have a canine first aid kit on hand. Have you ever had to conduct cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a dog?

How to Give a Dog CPR

As animal lovers, we sincerely hope that we will never be need to do CPR on a companion animal. Think about the possibility of saving a life because you invested the time to learn how to do canine CPR. choking is the most common cause for which pet owners are called to conduct CPR on their pets, but drowning and other catastrophes may also necessitate it. Taking a few minutes to learn canine CPR might be the difference between triumph and tragedy for a pet owner. Before you attempt canine CPR on a dog or puppy, review the ABCs of pet first aid: Airway: Check the dog’s airway to make sure there isn’t anything blocking his breathing.

The dog is not breathing: Move the dog on their right side and look for chest movement to ensure the dog is not breathing.

If a dog is unconscious but still breathing, do not attempt CPR; instead, take them to a veterinarian as soon as possible.

The area on their ribcage where the elbow creates a point should be the location where their heartbeat should be the strongest.

Alternatively, if your dog has a heartbeat but is not breathing, you should go to step 3 and do rescue breathing or artificial respiration rather than chest compressions. Once you’ve ticked the airway, breathing, and heartbeat off your list, you may go on to the next step.

  • Make a call to an emergency veterinarian before beginning any CPR or rescue operations
  • They may be able to provide guidance
  • While you are performing CPR, call for assistance so that a bystander may speak with the emergency clinic. or take you to a clinic while you continue CPR on the patient

How to do CPR on an Adult Dog or Older Puppy

  • Placing one palm on the side of an older puppy or small dog, at the ribcage region immediately below their armpit, is the best way to do CPR. Placing both hands on top of each other over the rib gap under their armpit will work best for bigger breeds. Placing them on their backs with your hands packed over their sternum is the best way to handle barrel-chested dogs.

To apply maximum pressure, make sure your shoulders are higher than your hands as you lock your elbows.

Begin Giving Chest Compressions

Giving quick compression at a pace of 100-120 compressions per minute while pushing firmly down and compressing 1/3 to 1/2 of your pet’s chest depth is recommended. Keeping track of two compressions each second can be simpler. After 30 compressions, come to a halt. If you need a refresher on how quickly to pump, Billy Ray Cyrus’s “Achy Breaky Heart” is the perfect song to listen to for that.

Stop and Give 2 Rescue Breaths

Close the dog’s lips and stretch their neck to allow them to breathe more freely. Remove their mask and take two long breathes into their nose with your mouth over theirs. If you notice their chest moving, it is the movement of your breath. Repeat the pattern of 30 chest compressions and 2 rescue breaths, pausing every 2 minutes to check to see whether the dog has begun to breathe on his or her own over the next 10 minutes. Check for a heartbeat or movement in the chest once again. Throughout the process of rotating between chest compressions and rescue breathing, keep shouting for assistance.

How to do CPR on a Puppy (Small Or Newborn)

When pups are extremely young or newborn, you will perform a less vigorous kind of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on them because of their greater fragility.

  1. Compress their chest by pressing your thumb and fingers on the sides of their chest. Twice a second, squeeze the chest muscles
  2. Every 6 seconds, take a deep breath into the puppy’s nostrils.

In order to provide compressions to their chest, place your thumb and fingers on the sides of their chest. Twice a second, squeeze the chest muscles. Every 6 seconds, take a deep breath into the puppy’s nostrils;

How to give a dog CPR when it has stopped breathing and help save a life

Image courtesy of Jaromir Chalabala / EyeEmGetty Images Learn how to do CPR on a dog and what to do if a dog’s respiration has stopped or if the dog is choking. Many of us have received first aid training, which would enable us to assist in the event of a human health emergency in the future. But what about when our pets require immediate medical attention – would you be able to assist us? This material has been imported from another source. Visiting their website may allow you to access the same stuff in a different format, or it may provide you with even more information than you could get elsewhere.

The following are examples of such situations:

  • When their heart stops beating and they require CPR
  • When they cease to breathe
  • When they begin to choke

Caroline Allen, RSPCA London veterinary director, discusses to Countryliving.com/uk how the RSPCA can help animals in need. “The number of dogs that can be rescued with cardiopulmonary resuscitation is really rather small since, unfortunately, the majority of animals who require CPR have a very significant underlying condition and are unlikely to be able to be saved.” “We can’t imagine anything worse than not being able to treat a pet in an emergency, so we’d advise folks to learn some basic pet first aid instructions just in case,” she says.

From the RSPCA’s Pet First Aid Guide, we’ve compiled a few pointers on what to do if your dog is suffering from a medical emergency.

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NO HEARTBEAT AND NEEDS CPR

Caroline explains what she means “Dogs do not suffer from ‘heart attacks’ in the same manner that humans do, and as a result, they require CPR on a far less frequent basis. However, if a dog is drowning, choking, or electrocuted (while making certain the animal is away from the source), CPR can be performed effectively.” Keep in mind to remain cool and, if at all possible, have someone else contact the veterinarian while you are assisting your pet. What to do is as follows:

  1. Check to see whether there is a heartbeat by feeling and listening
  2. Gently put your pet on its side on a sturdy surface
  3. This will help it to relax. For further support, lay one hand beneath your pet’s chest while placing your other hand over his or her heart (just behind the elbow). Apply pressure on the heart of your pet. Greater force should be used to larger animals and less force applied to smaller ones. Press down 100-120 times each minute for a total of 100-120 seconds. Replace every 30 chest compressions with two rescue breaths on an alternating basis. Continue until you can hear or feel a heartbeat, or until you reach the veterinarian’s office.

Caroline provided the following advice to anyone who might be concerned about performing CPR on their dog: “You have absolutely nothing to lose! We would advise all pet owners to learn some basic first aid so that they would be prepared in the event of an emergency.”

CHOKING

Please keep in mind that a suffocating animal may bite out of fear. Symptoms:

  • Excessive pawing at the lips
  • Choking noises made when inhaling or coughing
  • Difficulty breathing Lips or tongue that are blue in color

What to do is as follows:

  1. Examine your pet’s mouth to determine if there is any evidence of a foreign item
  2. You should gently try to remove the thing if you see it, but be careful not to push the object further down their throat or be bitten if you do. To remove the object or if your pet collapses, place both hands on the side of your pet’s rib cage and apply hard fast pressure, or lay your pet on its side and strike the rib cage forcefully with the palm of your hand three or four times, depending on how heavy the object is. Continue until the item has been removed or you have reached the veterinarian’s office.

NOT BREATHING

Note: If at all possible, have someone else contact the veterinarian while you are assisting your pet. What to do is as follows:

  1. See if your pet is unconscious and has a heartbeat before administering first aid. Create a level surface for your pet’s airway by gently gripping its tongue and moving it forward (out of the mouth). Make a visual inspection of their throat to identify if any foreign items are restricting their airway (see Choking)
  2. Rescue breathing is performed by shutting your pet’s jaws and inhaling through your mouth straight into its nostrils until you observe its chest expanding. Continuing the rescue breathing once every 5 seconds once the chest has expanded is recommended. If your pet does not regain consciousness within a few minutes, take them to the veterinarian.

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CPR for Dogs and Puppies

Dr. Jennifer Coates, DVM, conducted an accuracy check on the information on January 24, 2020. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, sometimes known as CPR for dogs, is a procedure that involves the compression of the chest muscles while providing artificial breathing. It is often utilized when you are unable to feel or hear the dog’s heartbeat and the dog is no longer breathing on its own. Trauma, choking, and disease are all possible causes of this condition. It is important to remember that conducting CPR on dogs is potentially dangerous and might result in physical issues or even death if conducted on an otherwise healthy dog.

To the greatest extent possible, you should be able to have someone phone your veterinarian or an emergency veterinarian for instructions on how to do dog CPR while you are driving to the clinic.

CPR for Dogs and Puppies Less Than 30 Pounds (14 kg):

  1. Spread a level area on which to place the dog on his or her side (either is good). Make a fist and place one hand on either side of your chest, just over your heart. (If the dog is really little, you may alternatively place your thumb on one side of the dog’s chest and keep the rest of your fingers on the opposite side.)
  2. For a count of one, compress the chest to about one-third the breadth of the chest, and then release the chest for a count of one again. Continuing at a pace of 100-120 compressions per minute, if possible, shut the dog’s snout with your hand if you are able to administer artificial breathing. For every 30 compressions, take two deep breaths through your nose. If at all feasible, have someone else administer the two breaths so that you may continue to perform compressions while they administer the breathing. Each couple of minutes or so, a different person should take over executing the compressions in order to lessen the effect of weariness. Carry on with the CPR and artificial respiration for dogs until the dog is able to breathe on his own and the heartbeat has returned. After or during CPR, get the dog to the nearest veterinarian as swiftly as possible.

CPR for Medium/Large Dogs Over 30 Pounds (14 kg):

  1. Place the dog on his or her side (either way is good) on a level surface for the best results. You’ll need to go down on your knees or stand alongside the dog. It is also advisable to put the dog on his or her back when dealing with barrel-chested canines such as Bulldogs. Grasp the dog’s rib cage, just above the heart region, with one of your palms and place the other palm on top of it
  2. Firmly squeeze the rib cage down while keeping your elbows straight. For a count of one, compress the chest to one-third the breadth of the chest, and then release the chest for a count of one again. The compression rate should be between 100 and 120 compressions per minute. If you are able to give artificial breathing for the dog, shut the muzzle with your hand. For every 30 compressions, take two deep breaths through your nose. If at all feasible, have someone else administer the two breaths so that you may continue to perform compressions while they administer the breathing. Each couple of minutes or so, a different person should take over executing the compressions in order to lessen the effect of weariness. Continually repeat CPR and rescue breaths until the dog is breathing normally and has a heartbeat once again
  3. After or during CPR, get the dog to the nearest veterinarian as swiftly as possible.

Photo courtesy of Nina Buday/Shutterstock

How to Do CPR on Your Dog

This article will assist you in determining whether or not your dog need CPR, as well as how to do CPR on your dog in an emergency. Having the capacity to do canine CPR, also known as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, is a crucial skill for dog owners to be familiar with. Hopefully, you will never have to use this talent, but if you do, it may be really beneficial. To prepare for learning this ability, it is recommended that you view a video first. It will be simpler to translate the stated instructions into actions if you have seen them done previously, as is the case with many other things.

And this Cornell program takes a more in-depth look at the subject.

Evaluate Whether Your Dog Needs CPR

Before you begin doing CPR on your dog, you must first assess his condition. While cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can save a life, it can also cause significant harm. Except in extreme circumstances, you should avoid doing CPR on your dog. If your dog is attentive and paying attention to you, he will not require CPR.

If he’s been hit by a car, he may require medical attention, but doing CPR isn’t on his list of things that need to be done immediately now. In fact, he may be annoyed by your attempts to influence him! Never attempt CPR on a seizing dog since you run a high risk of injuring yourself in the process.

Check Breathing

Examine your dog’s respiration and pulse if it appears to be completely motionless. Although his breathing may be quiet and mild, you can still detect the rise and fall of his chest as well as the flow of air from his nasal passages. If your dog is breathing, you can skip the phase of CPR that involves giving him oxygen. You should cautiously open his lips and draw his tongue forward if you don’t see any signs of respiration. Look for anything that could be obstructing his airway and remove it if you find it.

Check for a Pulse

Check for breathing and a pulse if your dog is completely motionless. Despite the fact that his breathing is low and delicate, you can still detect the rise and fall of his chest and the movement of air through his nostrils. It is possible to skip the respiratory portion of CPR if your dog is breathing. Open his lips and gently pull his tongue forward if you don’t see him taking in any air. Look for anything that could be obstructing his airway and remove it as soon as possible.

How to Perform Dog CPR

Have your dog lie flat on his right side with his head down. Make a direct channel into his lungs by pulling his head and neck forward as far as it will go. Check to see that his tongue is moved forward and out to the side to avoid any airflow obstruction.

Step 2

As you place your hands on your dog’s chest, one palm should be over the other. It’s simplest to accomplish this if you’re standing behind your dog’s back. In the case of a little dog or puppy, you may be able to wrap your hand around his or her chest, with his or her fingers on one side and his or her thumb on the other.

Step 3

The goal is to perform a series of fast compressions, bringing the chest in roughly 14% to 33% of the way. Keep your elbows straight and the amount of pressure you exert under strict control. 15 compressions in 10 seconds is a reasonable number for a large dog; for a tiny dog, you might want to go with 17 compressions in 10 seconds.

Step 4

You’ve gotten the circulation flowing, and now it’s time to get some oxygen into your dog’s body. If you’re working alone, one breath for every 15 compressions is a good ratio to use. If you have assistance, you can take one breath every five compressions up to a maximum of one.

Step 5

You must securely seal your dog’s jaws in order for him to get artificial breathing. Then, with your lips as close to your dog’s nose as possible, exhale to breathe directly into his nose to give him a fresh breath. When you have a little dog, his entire muzzle may be in your mouth. As you take deep breaths into his nostrils, you should be able to feel his chest rise slightly. For a little dog or puppy, a soft breath will suffice to relieve the discomfort. If you’re dealing with a large dog, you might have to work harder to keep your breath.

Take a few deep breaths and then pause to allow air to escape.

Step 6

After each cycle of compression, clench your abdominal muscles and take a deep breath to assist get the blood flowing.

Step 7

Re-evaluate. After a minute or two, come to a halt and see whether or not your dog is responding. If you do not receive a response after around 20 minutes, you are unlikely to be successful. At any time, your dog may begin to fight you over this, at which point he will no longer require CPR help. The American Red Cross offers classes that teach CPR for dogs with the use of a special “dummy” canine. You may also inquire at your local veterinarian clinic or humane organization to see if they provide a lesson.

How to Perform CPR on a Dog

Documentation Download Documentation Download Documentation CPR is an abbreviation for ‘cardiopulmonary resuscitation,’ and it is a life-saving technique that is performed on dogs who have stopped breathing and/or do not have a beating heart. When a dog stops breathing, the oxygen levels in its circulation drop fast, and important organs such as the brain, liver, and kidneys begin to fail as a result of the lack of oxygen. It is critical to respond quickly after experiencing respiratory failure since brain damage can develop in as little as 3 – 4 minutes.

  1. 1 Get in touch with your veterinarian or an emergency animal hospital. Whenever you come across a dog that looks to be in critical trouble, the first thing you should do is contact emergency services.
  • If you see that the dog is not breathing, ask a bystander or a friend to call the emergency veterinarian so that you may begin delivering first aid right away. In order to provide the best treatment possible until emergency aid arrives, you will need to begin caring for the patient as soon as possible and continue until help arrives.
  • 2 Check to see if the dog is still breathing. The dog may be unconscious but still breathing if it has collapsed, and if the dog is still breathing, CPR is not necessary. To avoid complications later on, it’s critical that you first decide whether CPR is required before proceeding.
  • If you want to know if your dog is breathing, look for a slight rise and fall of the chest. In normal circumstances, a dog takes between 20 and 30 breaths per minute, which implies that its chest moves every 2 to 3 seconds. Put your cheek near to the dog’s nose and feel for air movement against your skin if you can’t see his chest moving. If his chest does not move and you can’t feel air movement, the dog is not breathing.
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  • s3 Look for the presence of a heartbeat. To identify the heart, put the dog on its side and swing its front elbow back to the place where it hits the chest wall, then repeat the process. The heart is located between the third and fifth intercostal spaces, which is the third to fifth intercostal space.
  • Examine the chest wall at this place on the chest for traces of the dog’s fur moving in sync with the heartbeat. If you don’t see any movement, place your fingers over the same spot on your chest and apply light pressure, feeling for the bump of a heartbeat on your fingertips
  • If you still don’t see any movement, place your fingers over the same spot on your chest and apply moderate pressure
  • If you are unable to detect a heartbeat, look for a pulse on the dog’s forearm. If you don’t see a pulse, run your fingers down the back of your front foot and beneath its primary stop pad (the pad that doesn’t touch the ground) and push lightly to feel for one.
  • 4 Make sure the dog’s airway is unobstructed. Examine the back of its throat for any obstructions by opening its mouth.
  • 4 Make sure that the dog’s airway is clean before continuing. Examine the back of its neck for any obstructions by opening its mouth
  1. 1Take anything that is obstructing the dog’s airway out of the way. If the dog has a heartbeat, you’ll want to concentrate on making sure the dog is breathing correctly. Remove any obstructions from the dog’s mouth, such as vomit, blood, mucous, or foreign material, before you begin the training session. 2Assign the dog to a position suitable for artificial respiration. Pulling the dog’s tongue forward is a good exercise. Align the top of the head with the back of the neck, then lean it back a bit to assist in opening the airway
  2. 3 Place your mouth over the airway to prevent it from being blocked. Using your mouth, put your tongue over the dog’s nose and mouth if it is a tiny dog. Put your lips over the dog’s nose if it is a huge dog
  • To shut the lower jaw, place one hand beneath the lower jaw. Keep the lips close by placing the thumb of the same hand on top of the nose and holding it there. Instead, cup both hands around the mouth (and lips if the dog is enormous) and chew on it with your teeth. It’s critical that you keep air from escaping via your mouth
  • Otherwise, you might choke.
  • 4 Start the artificial respiration machine. Blow onto the dog’s snout hard enough to cause the dog’s chest wall to rise slightly. It is best to cease blowing as soon as the chest has been slightly elevated, as this is likely to occur with a little dog. If you continue to blow into the dog’s lungs, you may cause permanent injury. Afterwards, open your lips to allow some air to escape.
  • To maintain proper breathing patterns, aim for 20-30 breaths per minute, or one breath every 2 – 3 seconds.
  • To maintain proper breathing patterns, aim for 20-30 breaths per minute, or one breath every 2 – 3 seconds.
  • One of the objectives is to alternate between chest compressions and artificial respiration in a sequence of one artificial breath for every ten to twelve chest compressions.
  • 6Discover the location of the dog’s heart. By putting the dog on its side and moving the dog’s front elbow back to the point where it hits the chest wall, you will be able to determine where the heart is located. 7 Exert chest compressions to relieve stress. Make a gentle but firm push with the palm of your hand over the heart, applying enough pressure to compress the chest to one-third or one-half of its original depth. During the compression, the action is swift and rapid: compress-release, compress-release, repeated 10 – 12 times approximately every 5seconds
  • Give one artificial respiration breath, and then continue the procedure three more times.
  • 8Take a break from time to time to examine the situation. Make a 2-minute check to see if the dog has restarted breathing on its own every 2 minutes. If this is not the case, maintain artificial breathing until assistance comes. 9 If the dog is a really big breed, abdominal compressions should be performed. If your dog is a huge or gigantic breed, abdominal compressions may be beneficial since they can assist restore blood to the heart, but they should not be performed at the cost of cardiac compression.
  • To provide abdominal compressions to a dog, gently squash or compress the front region of the stomach, which contains major organs such as the spleen and liver. If you want to add a “abdominal squeeze,” which can help blood return to the heart, you can do it by placing your left hand under the dog’s abdomen and using your right hand to “squeeze” the abdomen between your two hands. Once every two minutes or so, repeat this action. If your hands are already full with chest compressions and artificial breathing, you may want to forego this step.
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  • QuestionWhat is the most efficient method of performing CPR on a dog? A veterinarian with over 30 years of expertise in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice, Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS, is a member of the British Veterinary Medical Association. Veterinary medicine and surgery were among the subjects she studied when she graduated with honors from the University of Glasgow in 1987. She has been employed at the same animal clinic in her hometown for more than two decades now. An Answer from a Veterinarian Practice, practice, and more practice are the keys to improving your speed. Intensive care units and specialist hospitals with the best success rates in resuscitating patients conduct regular drills and practice sessions to ensure that every member of staff understands exactly what to do and that it becomes second nature. To achieve this in the domestic setting, it is necessary to follow the recommendations in this article and practice on a soft toy so that the number of breaths to chest compressions becomes second nature
  • Question Do you have any recommendations for an English bull terrier? A veterinarian with over 30 years of expertise in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice, Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS, is a member of the British Veterinary Medical Association. Veterinary medicine and surgery were among the subjects she studied when she graduated with honors from the University of Glasgow in 1987. She has been employed at the same animal clinic in her hometown for more than two decades now. An Answer from a Veterinarian Because of the structure of the English bull terrier’s head, mouth-to-nose resuscitation is the most efficient method of resuscitation. As you support the dog’s head with your hands, place your mouth over his lips and blow into it. Hopefully, this will be a successful method of assisting their respiration. Question It seems unethical to me that a veterinary facility would charge an additional price for CPR on a patient who is already under their care. A veterinarian with over 30 years of expertise in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice, Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS, is a member of the British Veterinary Medical Association. Veterinary medicine and surgery were among the subjects she studied when she graduated with honors from the University of Glasgow in 1987. She has been employed at the same animal clinic in her hometown for more than two decades now. An Answer from a Veterinarian This is a difficult topic to answer, however you should be aware that CPR incurs consumable costs, which you should be aware of. Extra intravenous catheters, for example, may need to be put, and medications to stimulate the heart or regulate an irregular heartbeat may need to be administered. Additional monitoring equipment, such as electrocardiogram (ECG) machines, may be necessary in critical care to watch for a recurrence cardiac arrest. In the same way that it is reasonable to pay for medicines when a pet becomes ill, it appears reasonable to pay for the medications and skill required to revive a patient.

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Video

Open the dog’s mouth and remove anything that is restricting its airway before doing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Pull the dog’s tongue forward and slightly lean the head back to allow the airway to be more easily opened. Then, seal your mouth over the airway with one hand while holding the other hand under the lower jaw to keep it closed. Blow into the dog’s snout hard enough to cause the dog’s chest wall to rise, then relax your lips to enable the air to exit from the dog. Aim for 20-30 breaths per minute, or 1 breath every 2-3 seconds, during the first several minutes.

Continue reading for information on how to locate a dog’s pulse.

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Did this article help you?

The worst-case situation for any pet owner is to discover their dog unconscious or not breathing properly. So why not invest a few minutes in learning emergency first aid for your pet and equipping yourself with the knowledge and skills to assist them in an emergency? Many of us get paralyzed by a sense of terror, compounded by the uncertainty of how to best assist our beloved pets. Some people are also concerned that their actions would exacerbate the issue rather than alleviate it. So, if your dog suddenly falls in the middle of a park, would you know what to do to ensure that your pet has the best chance of surviving?

Most importantly, it has the potential to save your dog’s life.

First and foremost, it’s crucial to understand that dogs are not the same as humans. As a result, applying human CPR procedures to your pet is not as straightforward as it appears. So continue reading to find out everything you need to know about performing CPR on dogs.

How do you know if a dog needs CPR?

As is usually the case, the safety of humans comes first. Make certain that you proceed with prudence. Even a non-responsive pet may bite out of pure instinct. To begin, you’ll want to look for the following things:

  • In the end, it all boils down to human safety. You must proceed with caution while dealing with this issue. It is possible for even the most unresponsive pet to bite out of necessity. In order to begin, you must look for the following things:

Second set of checks

It might be surprising how tough it can be to analyze these three indicators at times. If this is the case, the quickest and most effective approach to check on your dog is to perform three more fast checks. This fast exam should take no more than 15 seconds to complete and should be completed in under a minute.

Just remember ABC

  • Airway– gently lift the dog’s head back to allow them to breathe more easily. Remove anything that appears to be obstructing the airway
  • Check their respiration to make sure they are still alive. Check their circulation to see whether they have a pulse.

CPR for dogs

The dog’s airway should be opened by gently easing the dog’s head backwards. Anything that appears to be restricting the airway should be removed. Take a look at their respiration to make sure they are still alive. Make sure they have a pulse by checking their circulation.

If they have a pulse, you should start with up to 5 breaths into their nostrils.

The majority of the time, this is all that is required to re-oxygenate the pet and bring them back to life. If there is no pulse, begin by performing 30 firm and quick chest compressions for 10 seconds.

When to start giving CPR for dogs?

If a dog is unconscious and not breathing, you are doing cardiopulmonary resuscitation on them.

How to give chest compressions to a dog?

If a dog is unconscious and not breathing, you are doing CPR on them.

Where to give chest compressions on a dog?

To determine where you should do chest compressions for different-shaped dogs, refer to the infographic above. Chest compressions should be performed with the animal laying on its side, unless otherwise instructed. If your dog has a flat chest, such as a bulldog or a pug, it may be preferable for them to be on their back instead. You may, however, require the assistance of a second individual. At a rate of 100–120 compressions per minute, aim to compress the chest to a width of 1/3–1/2 of its whole breadth.

Carry on with the compressions and rescue breaths until you can hear the heartbeat and feel or hear regular breathing again.

Want a free dog CPR course?

For further information – and to give yourself the extra confidence you may feel you require – please see our free dog CPR training by clicking here.

About us

Additionally, in addition to our incredibly thorough online First Aid for Dogs course, we now offer a practical First Aid for Dogs course. During our 3-hour Dog First Aid training, you will learn how to care for an unconscious dog and how to treat a variety of injuries and diseases that regularly occur in dogs. These include choking, bleeding, fits, poisoning, and many more. The course is taught in small groups, and participants gain hands-on experience using a specially built dog manikin and a variety of other practical training tools.

  1. Please have a look around our website to learn more about our practical and online training courses.
  2. Furthermore, we strongly recommend that you take a fully regulated Practical or Online First Aid course to ensure that you are well-versed in what to do in the event of a medical emergency.
  3. First Aid for Life is a multi-award-winning, fully licensed and regulated first aid training company in the United Kingdom.
  4. They will customize the training to meet your specific requirements.
  5. First Aid for Pets provides this material only for the purpose of education.

It is not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinary advice. The author expressly disclaims all duty or responsibility for any errors or omissions, as well as for any mistreatment or misdiagnosis of any human or animal, regardless of how such errors or omissions occurred.

How to give dog CPR properly

The Telegraph has written an excellent story on Canine Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) – learn more here. People’s awareness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in humans has grown over the years, from being restricted to specialists to being broadly spread across society. When someone falls and becomes unconscious and ceases to breathe, most people are aware that they may be suffering from a heart attack and that CPR should be administered until emergency medical assistance arrives. What about in dogs, on the other hand?

And, if so, what should be the best way to go about it?

There are numerous examples of humans attempting to save the lives of animals through cardiopulmonary resuscitation (for example, a woman in Glasgow recently attempted to save the life of a pigeon through mouth-to-mouth resuscitation), but the majority of these heroic efforts are based on naive adaptations of human-based techniques.

When attempting to save a life, it is critical that the appropriate procedures be performed, and, as with any emergency, there is no time to stop and look things up on the internet: you must be familiar with the essentials beforehand.

How do you know if a dog needs CPR?

In any animal that displays the following three critical indications, cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) is a crucial differential diagnosis to consider:

  • Being unconscious, not breathing, not having a pulse or heartbeat are all symptoms of hypoxia.

Evaluation of these three signals may be quite tough, and the easiest method is to do three additional fast tests, which are based on the ABC acronym: To complete this exam, you should not spend more than 10 – 15 seconds. The dog’s airway is clean, breathing has stopped, and the color of his gums is not a healthy pink (showing that the circulation is not operating correctly), then it is probable that CPA has happened, and rapid CPR is required to save the dog’s life. If the dog’s airway is not clear (this may be determined by opening the dog’s jaws and gazing down the back of the throat), it is evident that the blockage must be eliminated (see below).

What is the best way to begin providing CPR to an animal?

The essential premise of CPR is the same, except that circulation should be handled first rather than last.

If a patient does not have sufficient cardiac output, ventilation is a waste of time, and studies have shown that the longer chest compressions are delayed, the worse the prognosis.

What is the best way to perform chest compressions to animals? Chest compressions in animals are used to achieve two different outcomes.

  • Increasing the flow of blood into the lungs in order to increase the amount of oxygen in the blood and to remove carbon dioxide from the blood Increasing the flow of blood to all essential organs in order to restore cellular metabolism

Chest compression accomplishes the aforementioned goals in two ways: first, by increasing the amount of air that enters the lungs.

  1. Because the heart is directly compressed, the chambers of the heart contract and expand as a result of this compression. The stimulation of blood flow around the chest is accomplished by changing overall pressures within the thorax, which is accomplished by chest compressions.

Chest compressions should be performed with the animal laying on its side, with the goal of compressing the chest to 1/3–1/12 of its breadth, at a pace of 100–120 compressions per minute, with the animal resting on its side. This fundamental rule applies to all types and sizes of animals, from dogs to cats to pigeons, and it is unbreakable. The well-known recommendation to use the beat of the BeeGees song “Staying Alive” when performing CPR on an animal is applicable to both people and animals.

Watch our video, come and join one of our online or practical courses,or read our bookto learn the very best way to save your pet in an emergency.

More information about dog CPR may be found in this excellent piece from the Telegraph. First Aid for Pets presents this information as a guideline only, and it is not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinarian advice in any manner. The author expressly disclaims all duty or responsibility for any errors or omissions, as well as for any mistreatment or misdiagnosis of any human or animal, regardless of how such errors or omissions occurred. It is extremely recommended that you take a hands-on First Aid for Pets course in order to understand what to do in the event of a medical emergency.

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