How Many Bones Does A Dog Have? (Solved)

Dogs have between 319 to 321 bones in their bodies. In comparison, humans have 206 bones in their bodies. The number of bones in a dog’s body really depends on the tail. Dogs with long tails will have a few more bones than dogs with short tails.

How Many Bones Does a Dog Have? – Dog Corner

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  • The main answer is actually very simple. All dog breeds have between 319 and 321 bones. So, the next time you see a question such as how many bones does a dog have you will know the correct answer. But, there are a lot of other things you should keep in mind. Humans have fewer bones, 206 in fact.

Contents

How many bones are in the dogs?

Dogs have between 319 and 321 bones in their body depending on the length of their tail; dogs with longer tails typically have two extra bones. The total number of bones in dogs is the same for all dogs regardless of their size, from toy poodles to great Danes.

What animal has 206 bones?

Your skeleton is made of your bones and skull – it protects your soft organs, such as your heart, lungs and brain! bones, but some bones join together as you grow? Adults only have around 206 bones! Humans, whales, elephants and horses are all mammals.

How many bones are in a dogs foot?

Humans have 206 bones while dogs have approximately 320 depending on the length of the tail. Of the human’s 206 bones, 106 bones are in the hands and feet; 27 in each hand and 26 in each foot).

How many bones are in a dogs skull?

Regardless of breed, all dogs have about 50 bones in their skulls. The main difference between dogs is the size of the bones — small dog breeds have smaller bones, and large dogs have larger bones. The skull comes in two parts: the cranial and the face.

How many bones does a cat have?

Musculo-Skeletal System The cat’s skeleton is not so different from the human skeleton. The cat has more bones— 230 as opposed to 206—but many are identical to those in the human being. Cats have 13 ribs; humans have 12. Cats do have clavicles (collar bones) but unlike humans, they are not attached to other bones.

How many bones does a giraffe have?

The Skeleton of Giraffes The giraffe skeleton consists of ~170 bones.

How many bones does a pig have?

Prepared, real skeleton of an adult domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) consisting of approximately 223 individual bones, which are rigidly connected to each other.

Do dogs have 4 knees?

From this, it should be clear that dogs and cats (and countless other animals) don’t walk around with four knees. They’ve only got two, and they’re always in the rear. Now it does look like our pets have knees in the front, but those are actually wrist joints.

How many toes does a dog have?

Most dogs have 5 toes on the front legs and 4 toes on the back. However, there are certain breeds (especially giant dog breeds) such as the Pyrenean Mastiff, the Beauceron or the Saint Bernard, which may have an extra finger on the dewclaw.

Do dogs have 4 legs or 2 arms?

They have 2 arms and 2 legs, dogs have shoulder joints, wrists, elbows, just like humans. The only difference is we are bipedal which frees up our arms for other tasks while a dog quadrupedal and require all four limbs for running and stability.

How many legs does a dog have?

How many legs does dog have? If we’re speaking English, then the answer is “ 4 ” — in the hypothetical scenario, dogs still have 4 legs (imagine it, if you like, there are lots of people going around pointing at dogs’ tails saying “that’s a leg”, but the dogs still only have 4 legs).

What is a dog’s armpit called?

These axillary lymph nodes, as they’re called, are located on either side of your dog. Lymph nodes are approximately the size of a bean and swell up when your dog experiences infections, viruses or wounds.

How many ribs do dogs have?

The number of ribs differ between species: Carnivores:12-14 (9 sternal, 4 asternal) Dogs: 13 (9 sternal, 4 asternal)

How many bones does a dog have?

Dogs have between 319 and 321 bones in their body, depending on their size. Human beings, on the other hand, have 206 bones in their body. The tail has a significant impact on the amount of bones in a dog’s body. In comparison to dogs with short tails, dogs with long tails will have a few more bones. Disconnected shoulder bones in dogs, as opposed to human shoulder bones, allow for a larger range of motion when sprinting. They do not have a collarbone either, which is due to the same cause. The development of a dog’s skeleton can take anywhere from 3 months to 18 months.

For example, the skeleton of a small breed may mature within a few months, but the skeleton of a bigger breed would mature over a period of 15 to 18 months.

This condition affects the form and arrangement of the bones in the body.

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Based on the length of the dog’s tail, the number of bones in his body ranges between 319 and 321; dogs with longer tails often have two more bones. The total number of bones in dogs is the same for all breeds and sizes of dogs, from miniature poodles to great Danes, regardless of their size. The fact that dogs have 206 bones compared to humans may seem odd, but the fact is that a dog’s bones allow him to move and be active in ways that people do not generally move. The bone structure of a dog allows them to move in ways that a person cannot.

Total number of bones in dogs

When you consider how dogs walk, it seems sense that they have a greater number of bones than people. Dogs have four legs and four paws, and each of them has bones that support their weight and protect their organs, as well as bones that support muscles used in sprinting, jumping, stopping abruptly, and moving in the opposite direction of the original direction of movement. Unlike humans, dogs’ shoulder bones are not attached to their collar bones, allowing them to move and jump more freely, as well as to take longer steps than they would if they were connected.

For example, all dogs have compact feet and walk on their toes, which is common throughout all breeds.

Dogs’ rear legs, on the other hand, are more stiff and have a knee (referred to as a stifle) that connects the femur, tibia, and patella bones together.

The spine, neck, head, sternum, and ribs are all included in the axial portion.

The appendage part contains the legs and feet, whereas the visceral section contains tiny bones such as those found in the inner ear and other internal organs. Dog breeds, on the other hand, differ in their anatomy more than any other species, despite their apparent similarity in appearance.

Taking good care of your dog’s bones

Consider how dogs walk, and it becomes apparent that they have a greater number of bones than people. Dogs have four legs and four paws, and each of them has bones that support their weight and protect their organs, as well as bones that support muscles used in running, jumping, stopping fast, and running in the opposite direction of the original direction of the run. Unlike humans, dogs’ shoulder bones are not attached to their collar bones, allowing them to move and jump more freely, as well as to take longer steps than they would otherwise.

  1. To provide an example, all dogs have compact feet and walk on their toes when they are walking.
  2. As compared to humans, dogs’ back legs are more stiff and have an extra bone called the stifle that connects the bones of the femur, tibia, and patella (the bottom of the foot).
  3. The spine, neck, head, sternum, and ribs are all part of the axial section.
  4. Dog breeds, on the other hand, differ in their anatomy more than any other species, despite their apparent similarity.

Watch out for bone problems

Dogs can acquire bone abnormalities as a result of their genetics. Image courtesy of Catherine Falls Commercial/Moment/Getty Images. Dogs can acquire bone issues, such as fractures, deformities, tumors, and arthritis, as they age, and this is especially true for older dogs. These indicators of arthritis, as well as cries out when touched, limping, and appearing fatigued all of the time, might indicate the presence of arthritis or other illnesses or diseases that could affect the bones in your dog’s body.

How Many Bones Does A Dog Have?

Bodies are mineralized hard tissue present in both humans and animals, and they are classed based on their structure. In spite of the fact that dogs have a complicated bone structure, each and every bone in their body plays an important function in their health and well-being. Bones, in both humans and animals, contain important nutrients and are equipped with nerves and blood arteries of their own. The skeletal system of a dog is similar to the skeletal system of a person in that it facilitates mobility, provides stability and other physical functions, and protects the body’s critical organs.

So how many bones does a dog have?

Humans have 206 bones in their body, but dogs have 319 to 321 bones in their bodies, depending on the length of their tail. Compared to dogs with shorter tails, dogs with longer tails have a greater number of bones. Removing bones from a dog’s body, whether for artificial or medical reasons, is another factor that can influence the average number of bones in a dog’s body.

Whatever size your dog is, whether it’s a little breed like the chihuaha or an enormous one like the labrador, they all have the same amount of bones in them.

Understanding the Dog’s Skeletal System

The dog’s skeletal shape and size vary more than those of any other animal species, and this is especially true for large dogs. The visceral, appendicular, and axial skeletons of dogs are divided into three sections: the visceral, appendicular, and axial. The axial section of the body provides support for the body’s major structures, which include the sternum, spine, ribs, head, and neck. The visceral skeleton is comprised of the tiny bones body components, which include the inner ear organs, and the appendicular skeleton is comprised of the legs and feet, respectively.

  1. Instead, they have a cartilage-based collarbone that serves as a basic protection.
  2. The detached shoulder bones and lack of a collarbone allow them to run with greater freedom, greater flexibility, and longer strides than other people.
  3. Long bones, which are found on the limbs, support the weight of the dog while also allowing for movement and flexibility.
  4. The wrists and ankles are the sites of their presence.
  5. They are also essential to the skull because they provide protection by encircling the sensitive portions of the body, including as the brain, sinuses, eyes, and ears, which are particularly vulnerable.
  6. Skulls with irregular bones, hip bones with irregular bones, and the spinal column with irregular bones are all common.
  7. Check see the following article:What Happens If A Dog Gets Vaccinated Twice?

How Long Does It Take the Dog’s Skeletal Structure to Develop?

It takes between three and eighteen months for the dog’s skeleton to reach full development. The length of time it takes for a dog to achieve adulthood is determined by its size. The skeletal maturity of a large dog can take as long as 15 to 18 months, but the skeletal maturity of a tiny dog can take as little as a few months to attain maturity. Some dog breeds, such as the basset hound, are affected by skeletal dwarfism during their growth phases, resulting in their bones being positioned and shaped differently than those of other dogs in the same environment.

The Main Functions of the Bones

  • This is the primary storage location for phosphorus and calcium, which are vital minerals that the body uses for a variety of tasks. Protects the internal organs from injury by encircling them and enveloping them with protection
  • The hard structural structure of the body is the responsibility of this organ. The bone marrow is located here, and it is responsible for the production of red blood cells and some types of white blood cells.

Primary Skeletal Diseases in Dogs

Here is a list of the most common skeletal diseases that may be detected in dogs.

  • Among the congenital illnesses include panosteitis, hip dysplasia, osteochondrosis, hypertrophic osteodystrophy, multiple cartilaginous lesions, and osteomyelitis. Among the nutritional problems are
  • Celiac disease
  • Celiac disease Rickets, chronic renal failure, vitamin D insufficiency, trauma, calcium and phosphorus inadequacy, and cancer are all possible causes.

In addition to the following congenital diseases: Panosteitis; Hip Dysplasia; Osteochondrosis; Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy; Multiple Cartilage Dysplasia; and Osteomyelitis, there are nutritional disorders to consider. Nutritional disorders to consider are as follows: Rikettsia, chronic renal failure, vitamin D inadequacy, trauma, calcium and phosphorus shortage, and cancer are all possible outcomes.

Wrapping It Up

Bones are extremely important to a dog, just as they are to people, since they are responsible for a wide range of physiological processes. There is still more to learn about the dog’s bone structure, but we hope that the information provided above helps to answer the question of how many bones a dog has.

how many bones do dogs have

Whether your dog is chasing squirrels or romping around the yard with a ball in his jaws, his bones will always be there to provide him with support and stability. Movement is the result of a well-coordinated effort on the part of neurons, muscles, and bones, all working together to bring it all about. When it comes to bones, dogs have a diverse collection of varied forms and sizes, all of which serve to offer structural foundation and general support for his entire body. So, let’s learn more about dog bones today, including the numerous functions they do during a dog’s life and the potential difficulties that their bones may confront.

  • Yes, there are quite a few of us!
  • If you want accurate numbers, dogs have more than 300 bones, but if you want more precise data, we are closer to 319 bones, give or take, depending on how many bones are in a dog’s tail.
  • Let’s start by taking a quick look at our overall composition.
  • The majority of us are protected by a protective layer known as the periosteum, which is responsible for supplying blood and nutrients to our bodies throughout our lives.
  • If you’re wondering what periosteum looks like, think of it as the white thin layer that sits between an egg and its shell, only thinner.
  • Compact bone is located just under the layer of periosteum, and it is the smooth and extremely hard bone that most people associate with us when they think of us.
  • As the name says, this is the spongy section of the dog’s bones and joints that is frequently seen near the extremities of the bones and joints.
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When you put all of these pieces together, you get a sense of our overall makeup.

What if I told you something you already knew?

We Provide Safety and Security We will do everything in our power to keep your dog from getting hurt.

The strong skull of your dog is also there to protect the brain from potentially dangerous concussions.

Fun Fact: According to veterinarian Race Foster, the bones in a dog’s ears are not there for protection or support, but rather for sound transmission, which allows canines to use their sense of hearing, as explained above.

As previously said, your dog’s ability to frolic around is a result of the collaboration of neurons, muscles, and bones working together.

Joints are the points at which we connect with one another and play an important part in our ability to move.

For example, the dog’s hip is an example of a ball and socket joint, but the dog’s elbows are hinge joints.

When people think of us, they frequently conjure up images of bones displayed in a museum or of bigknuckle bones fed to their dogs, which is understandable given that they are the only sorts of bones most people will ever see.

The fact that we are still alive and well in the body of a living human (or cat or dog) is evidenced by the fact that we continue to develop, mend, and even produce blood cells.

Minerals are kept at our facility.

We store fat as well as numerous critical minerals so that they are available when the dogs require them.

All of this is regulated by the parathyroid gland, which releases an unique hormone that instructs the body to release calcium into the circulation when it is required.

Fractures are one of the most prevalent disorders that impact us, and they can occur in any of us at any time.

We may also get infections and health issues as a result of low calcium levels in the bloodstream.

This is not an exhaustive list, but rather a selection of issues that may be of concern to us.

Our joints can dislocate and/or shatter when we are subjected to high-impact incidents, such as being struck by a car, resulting in substantial pain.

At times, we might also break because of an underlying disease that makes us feel weak.

While this fracture can damage any bone, the bones of the dog’s leg are the ones that are most vulnerable to it.

Unfortunately, there is currently no surgical option for repairing this sort of fracture.

Osteomyelitis is the medical name for an infection of the bone or bone marrow that can be caused by bacteria or a fungus infection.

When it comes to germs, an illness in the body can either spread to us or remain confined.

Coccidiomycosis, blastomycosis, and cryptococcosis are some of the fungal illnesses that can harm us.

Growth Plates Have a Number of Issues When puppies are born, they are born with all of the bones they would ever require; but, as they grow, their bones will need to be lengthened to accommodate their increased size.

Dr.

In order to avoid overexerting pups, such as running them on hard surfaces, it is vital to limit their physical activity.

In most cases, by the time a puppy reaches one year of age, the growth plates have closed and major bone development has stopped.

Dr.

The Consequences of a Low Calcium Level As previously stated, minerals, including calcium, are stored in our bodies.

What happens in the majority of cases of dog eclampsia is that the mother dog’s body is unable to keep up with the increased calcium requirements associated with breastfeeding.

Insufficient calcium levels in the bloodstream cause afflicted dogs to acquire a stiff stride, fever, and fast breathing.

Dr.

Eclampsia can be triggered by inadequate calcium and phosphorus supplementation during pregnancy, as well as by improper calcium to phosphorus ratios.

When it comes to calcium, too much of a good thing is not always a good thing.

A high calcium intake in pups is detrimental to their growth and can result in skeletal deformity, according to Dr.

Dogs’ Bones That Are Getting Older After years and years of giving movement, safety, and support, we are beginning to feel the affects of time, which is unfortunate.

Without this layer of protection, our bones are left grinding against one another, causing friction and harm to our bodies as time goes on.

Spurs of bone may also occur on the body.

As previously said, our bones are capable of a great deal, but they are also prone to malfunction!

I hoped this was of assistance in learning more about us!

With best wishes, The bones of your dog Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a replacement for expert veterinary advice. If your dog is experiencing health issues, please take him to the veterinarian for a professional diagnosis and treatment. References:

  • The bones in your dog’s mouth are always there to support him, whether he’s chasing squirrels or romping around with a ball in his teeth. In order for movement to occur, nerves, muscles, and bones must collaborate in a well-orchestrated effort to bring it about. When it comes to bones, dogs have a diverse collection of different shapes and sizes, all of which serve to provide structural framework and general support for their entire bodies. To learn more about dog bones, the various tasks they perform throughout a dog’s life, and potential problems that a dog’s bones may encounter today, continue reading. Your Dog’s Bones Have Arrived! Hello there, today’s message comes from your dog’s bones :). There are quite a few of us, to be honest. Do you want to know how many bones dogs have in their bodies? We know that dogs have more than 300 bones, but if you want exact figures, we’re closer to 319 bones, give or take a few depending on how many bones are in a dog’s tail, according to our calculations. To make a comparison between the number of dog bones and human bones, consider that humans have approximately 206 bones, which means that dogs clearly win in the bone quantity department– if there ever was a contest for that! Take a quick look at our composition to get things started. Minerals make up the majority of our structure, with calcium and phosphorus being the most abundant. We are similar to onions in that we are composed of many layers. The majority of us are protected by a protective layer known as the periosteum, which is responsible for delivering blood and nutrients to our bodies and organs. Additionally, the periosteum contains cells that assist us in the process of growing and healing. Think of the periosteum as the thin white layer that lies between an egg and its shell if you’re wondering what it looks like. In a lot of ways, that’s exactly how we look. Compact bone is located directly beneath the layer of periosteum and is the smooth and extremely hard bone that most people associate with us when they think of us. Cancellous bone, also known as spongy ortrabecular bone, is found beneath the compact bone and is a type of bone. Essentially, this is the spongy part of the dog’s bones and joints that is often found at the ends of the bones and joints. Finally, there is the bone marrow, which is the most inward part of our bodies and performs numerous important roles. You can get an idea of our composition by putting all of these pieces together. Take a look at our daily activities now! That’s right, it’s true. Both Chihuahuas and Great Danes have approximately the same number of bones, despite their significant differences in size. Providers of Safety and Security To ensure that your dog is not injured, we do everything in our power to protect him. You’ll notice if you look at your dog’s ribs that they are arranged in the shape of a shield, which is intended to protect the dog’s vital internal organs, such as the heart and lungs. As a bonus, your dog’s thick skull shields his brain from potentially lethal concussions. As it turns out, dogs benefit from having a thick skull. Fact: According to veterinarian Race Foster, the bones in the dog’s ears are not there for protection or support, but instead serve primarily as a means of sound transmission, allowing dogs to utilize their sense of hearing. Mobility Is Permitted by Us As previously stated, your dog’s ability to romp around is a result of the collaboration between nerves, muscles, and bones. We are all connected to one another like jigsaw puzzle pieces that connect to one another’s bones in the same way. Joints are the points at which we attach to one another and play an important role in our ability to move around freely. In different ways, we interlock with one another
  • For example, the dog’s hip is an example of a ball and socket joint, whereas the dog’s elbows are hinge joints. It is our company’s responsibility to manufacture cells It is common for people to envision bones in a museum or bigknuckle bones fed to their dogs when they think of us, which is understandable given that those are the only types of bones most people will ever see in their lifetimes. In contrast to museum exhibits, we are far from the dead and dried-up bones. The fact that we are still alive and well in the body of a living person (or animal or dog) is evidenced by the fact that we continue to grow, repair, and even generate blood cells. We have special stem cells in our bone marrow, which is a dark tissue found in hollow bones, and they work tirelessly to produce red and white blood cells for us. Mining Minerals are kept on-site. Bones are not commonly thought of as a storage facility for vital substances required by the human body. In order to ensure that dogs have access to fat and several important minerals, we store these in advance. All of these minerals are constantly being moved around, deposited and removed as needed. All of this is coordinated by the parathyroid gland, which produces a special hormone that instructs the body to release calcium into the bloodstream when it is appropriate. In the Event of a Mistake Because we are not indestructible, many things can go wrong with us. We can all suffer from fractures, which are one of the most common problems that we encounter. If our owners are not attentive enough to care for us as puppies, we may also experience problems as adults. Infections and problems associated with low calcium levels in the bloodstream are also possible outcomes. A quick rundown of some of the issues we could run into is provided below: Although not exhaustive, the following are a few of the issues that may arise. Bruises on a Dog’s Bone It is possible to dislocate and/or break our bones in high-impact accidents, such as being hit by a car, resulting in significant discomfort. Some fractures (such as toe fractures) may only require a splint, while others may necessitate an expensive and time-consuming surgical procedure. We can also break due to an underlying condition that makes us feel weaker than we are. Cancer of the Dog Bone We may suffer from what is known as a “pathological fracture” when cancer strikes us, as we are destroyed from the inside out. It is the dog’s leg bones that are most prone to this fracture, but it can affect any bone in the body. What occurs is that, when bone is lost, it is partially replaced by tumorous bone, which is not as strong as true bone and, as a result, the leg becomes more susceptible to fracture. Unfortunately, there is no surgical method for repairing this sort of fracture. Infection of the Dog Bone Sometimes we get infected as well, which is true. A bacterial or fungal infection can cause osteomyelitis, which is the medical word for infection of the bone or bone marrow. It can also be caused by an infection of the bloodstream. In the case of bacteria, an infection in the body may spread to us, or the illness may be more confined in its effects. Bitters, wounds, and injuries may let bacteria to enter the body. Complications of bone surgery may also allow bacteria to enter. Coccidiomycosis, blastomycosis, and cryptococcosis are three types of fungal illnesses that can affect humans. Pain, heat, and swelling are common symptoms in dogs suffering from fungal infections that damage the bones. Growth Plates Have a Number of Issues. The bones that puppies require are already there when they are born, but as they develop, the length of their bones must be extended. Because of this, our bones tend to develop from patches of immature, soft bone known as growth plates, which are seen around the ends of the puppy’s bones. Dr. Race Foster, a veterinarian, notes that these growth plates are fragile and can be easily injured or fractured. In order to avoid overexerting pups, such as running them on hard surfaces, it is necessary to limit their physical activity. “Closing the growth plates” is the term used to describe the process by which we develop and eventually harden with calcium and minerals. It is common for puppies’ growth plates to close by the time they reach one year of age, and major bone development ceases. A vitamin D shortage is characterized by poor mineralization of the bone and growth plates, a condition known as rickets. Dr. Sally Perea is a neurologist who specializes in pain management and addiction treatment. Calcium Deficiency Has Negative Consequences Minerals, such as calcium, are stored in our bodies, as previously stated. When dogs give birth and have a big litter, they may lose an excessive amount of calcium all at once, which can result in hypocalcemia (low calcium), milk fever, or eclampsia, all of which are potentially fatal conditions. Dog eclampsia is defined as the condition in which the mother dog’s body is unable to keep up with the increased calcium requirements associated with lactation. Her parathyroid gland is not able to remove this mineral from her bones quickly enough when this occurs, resulting in an abrupt drop in her blood levels of this mineral. Insufficient calcium levels in the bloodstream cause afflicted dogs to acquire a stiff stride, fever, and fast breathing. If no therapy is administered, death may result if the condition is not addressed. Dr. Race Foster says that while well-intentioned dog owners may supplement calcium during a dog’s pregnancy, doing so isn’t advised. Eclampsia can be triggered by inadequate calcium and phosphorus supplements during pregnancy, as well as by inadequate calcium to phosphorus ratios. That’s right, it’s true. Calcium is another example of something that may be overdone. Giving calcium supplements to pups is something that breeders and dog enthusiasts may advise, but it is a dangerous proposition. Dr. Jennifer Larsen, a veterinary nutritionist, advises that giving puppies too much calcium might be harmful to their growth and could induce bone deformity. Bones in Dogs That Are Getting Older The impacts of time begin to be felt after years and years of service in providing mobility, protection, and support. When the cartilage that cushions joints begins to wear away, it is known as degenerative joint disease. Unless we have this protective covering, our bones will rub up against one another, causing friction and injury to our bodies. Large dogs are the most commonly afflicted, and the weight-bearing joints, such as the hips, elbows, and knees, are most susceptible. Spurs of bone may also form on the bones. In spite of the fact that there is no treatment for old age, there are vitamins and drugs that can thankfully help to alleviate inflammation and discomfort. As previously said, our bones are capable of a great deal, but they are also susceptible to injury. Make sure we’re in good health and that you notify your veterinarian as soon as you see something wrong. Hope this has been of use in learning more about us. Thank you for your time and consideration. Bones from your dog Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be used as a substitute for expert veterinary consultation. Veterinary care should be sought if your dog is experiencing health difficulties. A proper diagnosis and treatment will be provided by your vet. References:
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Images courtesy of: Lateral view of a dog skeleton, courtesy of the University of Wisconsin Digital Collections Public Domain Fuelbottle courtesy of Commons WikiaPublic domain

How Many Bones Does a Dog Have?

Images courtesy of: Lateral image of a dog skeleton, courtesy of the University of Wisconsin Digital Collections Public Domain. Public domain fuelbottle image from commonswiki

Differences between the human and the canine skeleton

Some bones have a different form in dogs than they do in people, such as the thigh bones and the femur, which are more bent in dogs than they are in humans. In addition, dogs do not have clavicles, whereas humans do. Another distinction to be observed is the placement of the kneecap, which is different in dogs and humans. Dogs have theirs immediately above the joint and at the bottom of the femur, whereas people have theirs over the tibia and femur (forming the knee joint). There are more distinctions between the two species’ osteo-skeletal systems, but these are the most significant ones in terms of their osteo-skeletal systems.

How many bones in a dog’s head?

There are 50 bones in the skulls of all dogs, no matter what breed they are. The sole variation between one breed and another is the size of the bones in the skeleton.

How many bones in a dog’s tail?

According to the theory, the tail should contain 23 bones if it has not undergone any cosmetic alterations. However, the quantity might vary from one animal to the next depending on the species. The tail can be as short as 6 vertebrae in rare circumstances, which is considered to be extremely short.

How many bones in a dog’s spine?

If the tail has not been altered for cosmetic purposes, it should have a total of 23 bony structures. Animals’ numbers, on the other hand, might differ from one another. The tail can be as short as 6 vertebrae in rare circumstances, which is considered extremely small.

  • If the tail has not been altered for cosmetic purposes, it should have a total of 23 bones. However, the number might differ from one animal to the next depending on the species. In extreme circumstances, the tail can be as short as six vertebrae in length.

Different types of bones in Dogs

A dog’s body is made up of five different types of bones. These are the ones to look out for: Located predominantly in the ankles and wrists, their major function is to provide the dog with delicate mobility while also maintaining balance and stabilizing it. Located predominantly in the ankles and wrists, their major function is to provide the dog with exquisite mobility while also maintaining balance and stabilizing him. These are mostly found in the ankles and wrists of the dog, and its principal function is to provide the dog with delicate mobility as well as balance.

Unusual bones can be found in the skull and in the spinal column, but they can also be found in the hips and in the pelvic region.

What are dog bones made out of?

Irregular bones can be found in a variety of places including the cranium and spinal column, but they can also be found in the hips.

What is the purpose of bones in a dog’s body?

This may appear to be a nonsensical question, but the fact is that dog bones are necessary not only for providing the animal with a structural foundation that allows everything else to function properly, but also for a variety of other reasons. The bones of a dog can also prevent its organs from being harmed after a traumatic event, and they can also guarantee that physical mobility is feasible by acting as surfaces on which ligaments, tendons, and muscles can contract and expand, among other things.

However, this does not imply that they should – dogs should receive the proper nourishment in order to avoid developing rickets in the first place.

Anomalies of the skeletal system in dogs Some of the most common skeletal abnormalities that dogs are prone to (or are born with) include the following: scoliosis, kyphosis, and scoliosis scoliosis

  • Hip dysplasia, fractures, OCD (osteochondrosis dissecans), osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease), and osteochondrosis dissecans are all conditions that can occur. Osteomyelitis
  • Panosteitis
  • Osteosarcoma is a type of bone cancer. Apodia (the dog is born without any feet)
  • Apodia (the dog is born without any feet)
  • Polydactyly (a congenital abnormality defined by the presence of more toes than is normal)
  • Cleft palate
  • Cleft palate repair
  • Cleft palate repair Rickets (which are more prevalent in younger animals)
  • Osteoarthritis

Structure and Function of the Skeleton in Dogs

The information provided below provides details on the structure and function of the canine skeleton. We will discuss the overall anatomy of the skeleton, how bones function in dogs, common disorders that impact the skeleton, and common diagnostic procedures that may be conducted on dogs to examine the skeleton in more detail later on.

What Is the Skeleton?

The skeleton is the bone structure of the body that can be found in all vertebrate animals, including dogs, and serves as their structural support. It is made up of three parts: bones, ligaments, and cartilage. The skeleton is made up of the body’s hard tissues, and its principal roles are to support the body, to provide a system of levers for mobility, to protect the body’s delicate organs, and to create red blood cells. The skeleton is constructed of the hard tissues of the body (hematopoiesis).

For example, a dog’s shoulder blades are not closely attached to its bones, allowing the dog to move more freely and exhibit greater flexibility than humans.

Where Is the Skeleton Located in Dogs?

The skeleton may be found all throughout the body and head, including the skull.

What Is the General Structure of the Canine Skeleton?

  • The skeleton is composed of three skeletal subunits: the appendicular skeleton – the bones of the limbs
  • The axial skeleton – the bones of the spine
  • And the axial skeleton – the bones of the neck. It is made up of the skull, spine, ribs and sternum (the bones of the chest and abdomen). The visceral skeleton is bone that is found within an organ (such as the middle ear ossicles) Bones are organs that are formed of hard, mineralized tissue and that serve to sustain the body’s structural integrity. Bones in different sizes and shapes are found in different breeds of dogs. Given that people have been breeding dogs for hundreds of years, the length and thickness of bones can vary significantly depending on the breed. However, even though the Chihuahua and the Great Dane have the same number and kind of bones as each other, their bones are significantly different in size and shape. Dogs have the most diverse skeletons of any animal species in terms of size and form, and this is especially true of canine skeletons. The skeleton is made up of bones that may be categorised according to their form, which are as follows: Limbs are characterized by the presence of long bones. Only the carpus and metacarpus bones, as well as the tarsus and metatarsus bones, are found in the wrist and ankle areas, respectively. Sesamoid bones are found near joints that are capable of unrestricted movement, such as the wrist and the knee (stifle). Flat bones are found in the pelvis, where they serve as attachment points for muscles and long bones, and in the head, where they surround and protect the eye, ear, sinuses, and brain
  • Flat bones are also present in the thorax and lumbar spine. The vertebral column, all of the bones of the skull that are not of the flat type, and three portions of the hip bone are examples of irregular bone structure. Bones are made up of multiple layers of connective tissue. The periosteum, a fibrous membrane that covers the outside of bone, protects it from injury. This membrane is densely packed with small blood vessels known as capillaries, which are important for providing nutrition to the bone. Cortical bone is the term used to describe the firm, dense outer layer of bone. Cortical bone accounts about eighty percent of total skeletal bone mass. The cortical bone bears the majority of the body’s weight and serves as a shock absorber. Cancellous bone (also known as trabecular bone) is a spongy structure within the bone that resembles a honeycomb in appearance. Cancellous bone contributes for approximately 20% of total bone mass. With the meshwork functioning similarly to the steel reinforcing rods that are embedded beneath concrete, this spongy mesh-like bone has been precisely engineered for strength and stability in the human body. Aside from bone marrow, bones also possess a hollow central shaft that contains the bone marrow (medullary cavity). Marrow is yellow when it is primarily composed of fat, and it is red when it is primarily composed of red and white blood cells, which are formed in the bone marrow. Red marrow can be found in specific bones, such as the leg (femur), upper arm (humerus), pelvic (ilium), and ribs
  • However, it is not found in all bones.

What Are the Functions of the Skeleton in Dogs?

  • The skeleton performs four essential functions: it supports and protects the body
  • It acts as a lever for muscle movement
  • It serves as a storage for calcium and phosphorus, as well as many other elements
  • And it helps the body move. Bones function as a factory for the production of red blood cells as well as numerous different types of white blood cells. Aside from that, it also stores fat in the average adult dog.

What Are Some Diseases of the Skeleton in Dogs?

  • Certain congenital and developmental bone diseases can occur in dogs at various stages of their lives. The following are some illustrations: Panosteitis is an infection of the marrow cavity of the long bones that affects the lower extremities. It typically affects young canines of huge or enormous breeds, as well as mixed breeds. Animals suffering from this condition exhibit indicators of bone discomfort, lameness, fever, and lethargy. Hip dysplasia is a condition in which the hip joint develops abnormally, resulting in the ball and socket of the joint becoming looser than they should be. Hip dysplasia is a condition that affects predominantly big breed dogs. Clinical symptoms may appear in young dogs or later in life as a result of the development of degenerative arthritis. The rear legs of affected dogs may become lame, and they may acquire a bunny-hopping gait in their back legs, as well as a reluctance to move and stiffness in their rear legs. Osteochondrosis dissecans (OCD) is a deficiency in the smooth cartilage surface of one or more joints, most commonly in the shoulder, elbow, hock, and knee. It is a degenerative disease of the cartilage surface (stifle). It is most common in large breed dogs that are young and growing
  • Chronic inflammation of the growth plates of the long bones is known as hypertrophic osteodystrophy (HOD). This condition, which generally causes swelling and discomfort in the bone right above the joints, is most common in puppies and young developing dogs, as well as enormous and giant breeds of dogs. Multiple cartilaginous exostoses are abnormal bone growths that occur in certain parts of the body, such as the long bones, ribs, and vertebrae, among other places. They commonly affect young dogs and can result in lameness and discomfort. The development of a variety of other joint abnormalities in young dogs is possible, such as aseptic necrosis of the femur head, dislocation of the knee cap (patella), and elbow dysplasia.

Osteomyelitis

Osteomyelitis is a kind of bone inflammation that is typically caused by a bacterial infection in the body. The presence of bone implants, such as bone plates and pins, and the presence of certain fungal diseases can also result in bone infection.

Nutritional disorders

  • Some illnesses that produce anomalies in the amounts of calcium, phosphorus, and certain vitamins in the bloodstream can have a negative impact on bone health. Examples include the following: Rickets is a severe weakening of the bones that occurs as a result of a calcium deficit or nutritional imbalances in the diet. It occurs more frequently in young dogs that are fed a diet consisting only of meat. Lameness, malformations, and bone fractures are common in pups
  • Chronic renal failure affects bone through affecting the levels of phosphorus and vitamin D in the body. The bones become soft, thin, and weak as a result of a lack of vitamin D in the food, or a poor conversion of vitamin D in the body as a result of a lack of exposure to sunshine, can have an impact on the formation of bone. It is possible to develop lameness, bone abnormalities, and fractures. Trauma. Among dogs, skeletal disorders caused by trauma to the bones are the most common. This is especially true for dogs that are allowed to roam freely. A variety of skeletal fractures and dislocations can occur in dogs that have been wounded in falls, traffic accidents, or fights. Cancer. Dogs can get osteoplasia, which is a kind of bone cancer. Tumors can develop within the bone’s tissues or they can spread to the bone from the surrounding soft tissues, depending on their location. Large breed dogs are more likely than small breed dogs to develop bone cancer. Lymphosarcoma, for example, is a cancer of the bone marrow that can affect canines.

What Types of Diagnostic Tests Are Used to Evaluate the Skeleton?

  • Physical examination and palpation of the skeleton are performed. In the initial evaluation of the skeleton, the bones and joints are palpated and the skeleton is subjected to a comprehensive inspection. In the examination room, the animal may be watched for symptoms of lameness and irregularities in gait
  • Radiography may be performed. On simple x-rays, cortical and cancellous bone, as well as several types of cartilage, are easily distinguished. As a result, plain x-rays are a critical tool in assessing the skeleton’s integrity. In certain cases, x-rays can be obtained with the animal awake and sedated, but in other cases, the animal must be totally anesthetized. Laboratory tests that are performed on a regular basis. A complete blood count and biochemistry profile may be performed to check for symptoms of illness as well as abnormalities in the levels of calcium and phosphorus in the bloodstream and urine. These tests are also useful in detecting other conditions that might have an impact on the bones, such as renal disease, anemia, and leukemia
  • Special laboratory testing. It is possible to obtain samples from the bone if it is thought that it has been infected by bacteria or fungal growth. It is also possible to submit results of serologic testing for fungal illnesses. In certain cases, the levels of vitamin D and parathyroid hormones in the blood are tested
  • A bone biopsy is performed. A bone biopsy may be required in order to determine the type of bone disease that is present. Bone marrow biopsy is very important in the situations of congenital and developmental bone disorders as well as osteomyelitis and bone malignancies, among others. A needle is inserted into the red bone marrow of one or more bones, and a sample of the bone marrow is aspirated. This procedure is used to diagnose bone marrow failure. Advanced imaging techniques are used to examine the bone marrow sample, which is subsequently transferred to a veterinary pathologist for microscopic inspection CT and MRI scans are extremely effective in the examination of bones and the soft tissues that surround them, such as cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. In some cases, radioisotope bone scans can be beneficial as well. It is frequently necessary to send your dog to a veterinary orthopedic expert or a veterinary radiologist in order to schedule these examinations. X-rays of the chest. Chest x-rays may be taken to check for signs of infection or tumors that have spread to the lungs, as well as to look for abnormalities in the ribs or vertebrae of the chest, among other things. 0paws up
  • August 3, 2015
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Here is the HTML code that has already been created so that you may see this image on your website: Here is the UBB code that has already been completed so that you can see this image on your forum: Dog skeleton: a carnivorousdomestic animal that has been bred to do a variety of chores for humans. The skull is a bone casing that contains the brain. The cervical vertebrae are the neck’s bones. In the thoracic cage, these are the bones that make up the dorsal section of the structure. Lumbar vertebrae are the bones that make up the lower back’s lumbar area.

  1. Caudal vertebrae are the bones that make up the tail.
  2. The femur is the top portion of a dog’s back leg.
  3. Tibia is one of two bones in the lower hind leg of a dog that are connected by a tendon.
  4. The metartasus is a paw bone that is located between the heel and the phalanges.
  5. Phalange is the bone of the finger.
  6. The carpus is the wrist bone.
  7. In dogs, the radius is one of two bones that make up the lower foreleg.

The humerus is the bone of the dog’s upper foreleg. The rib is a bone that is part of the thoracic cage. The scapula is the shoulder bone. Lower maxillary: also known as lower jaw. The orbit is the cavity in the sjull that houses the eye.

Photo:

To see this image on your website, copy and paste the following HTML code: To see this image on your forum, copy and paste the following UBB code: Canine skeleton: a carnivorousdomestic mammal that has been domesticated and trained to perform a variety of tasks for humans. The skull is a bony shell that contains the brain’s structure. These are the neck’s bones, known as cervical vertebrae. In the thoracic cage, these are the bones that make up the dorsal portion of the cage. Vertebrate lumbaris are the bones of the lower back that support the lumbar region.

  1. Caudal vertebrae are the bones in the back of the neck that support the head.
  2. When it comes to dogs, femur refers to the topmost portion of the back leg.
  3. In dogs, the tibia is one of two bones that make up the lower back leg.
  4. Between the heel and the phalanges is the metartasus, which means “paw bone.” phalanx: the bone of the toes Phalange is a bone at the middle of the fingers.
  5. Carpus is the bone of the forefinger and the wrist.
  6. One of the two bones of the lower foreleg of a dog’s lower foreleg is the radius.
  7. The rib is a bone in the thoracic cage that helps to support the rib cage.
  8. Jaw is referred to as the lower maxilla in this context.

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Objet virtuel: Dog psychology

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Why Bones Are Not Safe For Dogs

It is a fallacy that dogs are need to gnaw bones. While dogs like chewing, and the majority of them would enjoy chewing on bones, bones are harmful and can result in serious injury if chewed on.

Here are the top reasons that bones are bad for dogs (according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration):

Teeth that have been broken. When it comes to bones, they are extremely hard and can be brittle, making it very easy for a dog to break one of its large chewing teeth while chewing. A fractured tooth is extremely painful and should be addressed as soon as possible. Regardless of whether the tooth is removed or preserved with a root canal, this is a costly procedure. Mouth and tongue injuries are very common. It is possible for broken bones to have razor-sharp edges. The tongue, cheek, or soft palate on the roof of the mouth are among the areas where dogs can splinter bone into sharp shards that can penetrate the skin.

  • Round bones can become caught around the lower jaw, behind the lower canine teeth, if they are not properly positioned.
  • Dogs are capable of choking.
  • Sharp bone shards can puncture the delicate tissues at the back of the neck and even pierce the esophagus if they are not handled carefully.
  • Choking is a life-threatening emergency!
  • Similarly to how sharp bone fragments can cause damage to the mouth, they can cause damage to the stomach and intestines as well.
  • A condition known as peritonitis results as a result of this.
  • It is possible for bones to become lodged in the stomach.

Bone particles that become stuck in the stomach can cause persistent vomiting as well as stomach irritation and discomfort.

Bones can become lodged in the small intestine or colon, causing an obstruction.

A surgical removal of the impediment is required in this situation since it is an emergency.

This is extremely painful for the dog, as the bone pieces scrape against the lining of the colon and rectum, causing substantial damage to the animal.

Infection with microorganisms on raw bones is a problem.

coli, Salmonella species, and Listeria monocytogenes, raw meat and bones should be avoided.

Children, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals are the most vulnerable, and these organisms can be lethal in these groups of individuals.

Is there anything safe that I can give my dog to chew?

Teeth are broken. When it comes to bones, they are extremely hard and brittle, making it quite simple for a dog to shatter one of its enormous chewing teeth when gnawing on one. In order to avoid further discomfort, a fractured tooth must be treated as soon as it is discovered. No matter whether the tooth is removed or preserved with a root canal, the outcome will be costly. Mouth and tongue injuries are common. It is possible for broken bones to have razor-sharp fracture edges. The tongue, cheek, or soft palate on the roof of the mouth are all vulnerable to being pierced by sharp shards of bone broken off by dogs.

  • Round bones can become trapped around the lower jaw, behind the lower canine teeth, if they are not properly positioned.
  • Dogs are capable of choking on their own vomit.
  • Fragments of bone can enter the esophagus or pierce soft tissues at the back of the neck, injuring the victim.
  • Choking is a life-threatening situation!
  • In some situations, bone pieces may be able to fully puncture the walls of the stomach or intestine, enabling food and intestinal contents to flow into the stomach and into the abdomen.
  • It is possible for bones to become stuck in the digestive system.
  • Bone particles that become stuck in the stomach can cause prolonged vomiting as well as stomach discomfort and inflammation.

In the small intestine or colon, bones can become stuck and produce a blockage.

A surgical removal of the blockage is required in this situation since it is an immediate emergency.

Dogs are distressed as a result of this, as the bone fragments scrape and inflict significant trauma on the intestinal and rectum linings.

Raw bones have been contaminated by germs.

coli, Salmonella species, and Listeria monocytogenes, raw meat and bones should not be consumed.

Children, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals are the most vulnerable, and these organisms can be lethal in these groups of people.

Here’s What People Get Wrong About Dogs and Bones

  • This post includes affiliate links for your convenience. More information may be found here. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinary assistance.

Dogs and bones appear to go together like peanut butter and jelly. Because of this, there are several comic strips and movies that portray dogs munching on delicious bones. Despite this, some bones can pose a health and safety risk to your dog’s health and safety. It is normal for dogs to chew, and there are safe chews and bones available for them to consume. Dog bones, on the other hand, may give cerebral stimulation while also keeping your dog’s teeth clean. However, before you hand over any old bone, continue reading to understand which bones are healthy for dogs to eat.

No cooked bones, ever

The majority of people are aware that roasted chicken bones are harmful to dogs. Even raw bones may be harmful because they shatter and splinter into small, sharp fragments that can be swallowed by your dog and lodge in his mouth or digestive organs, causing serious injury. Broken bones can cause a variety of health concerns, including the following:

  • Bruises and lacerations to the mouth and tongue, as well as choking and broken teeth
  • Cuts and wounds to the mouth and tonsils. Vomiting and diarrhea are common symptoms of the flu. Constipation that is unbearable
  • An intestinal obstruction that may necessitate surgical intervention

The safest course of action is to never give your dog a bone from the dinner table. Even cooked beef bones have the potential to break into dangerous fragments. Cooked bones are not only harmful, but they are also less healthful than other bones since the cooking process removes many of the minerals that make them so helpful to the body. If you have leftover meat and bones from a dinner that you want to use up, consider boiling them and straining them to make a flavorful bone broth instead.

Choosing a raw bone for your dog

The majority of the time, raw bones are far less dangerous than cooked bones. There are some raw bones, however, that you should never give to your canine companion. These are some examples:

  • Pork bones, which are prone to splintering and cracking
  • Rib bones of any sort, especially those that are little and liable to break or become caught in your dog’s throat
  • Any bone that is smaller than your dog’s mouth and that they are capable of swallowing entire

Raw bones from cows and bison are typically considered safe when prepared and consumed properly. It’s vital to be aware of where your bones originate from, which is why you should get raw bones from a butcher that uses meat from local sources. Store them in the freezer and thaw them out one at a time before giving them to your dog as a treat. A raw bone the size of your dog’s head should be your first choice when selecting one for your canine companion. What’s the deal with being so big? A large bone, on the other hand, will allow your dog to chew while decreasing the likelihood that they may break off and ingest a potentially deadly part.

One word of warning when it comes to feeding your dog raw bones: they have the potential to transmit food-borne infections such as salmonella.

Safe commercial chews

Many dog owners prefer commercially sold chews because of the convenience and safety they provide. In accordance with the Veterinary Oral Health Council’s guidelines, Greeniedental chews are enjoyable and 100 percent digestible chews that fulfill your dog’s want to chew while also promoting his or her dental health. Another alternative is a chew toy that is not edible. One such product is theNylabone Dura Chew, a robust, durable nylon bone that has been impregnated with taste. It satisfies the chewing demand of dogs, cleans their teeth, and is nearly unbreakable, making it an excellent choice.

Bully sticks are an alternative to bones that some dog owners prefer to use.

They’re tough chews that will keep your pup occupied for a long time, but they should only be given to your pup as treats.

Whether you offer your dog a raw bone, a bone-shaped treat, or a non-digestible chew toy, you should always keep an eye on them while they are chewing something. If you allow your dog to chew for an extended period of time, make sure to remove the chew after 10-15 minutes.

How to give your dog a bone safely

courtesy of flickr.com/erlingfiallos When it comes to commercially available bones and chews, search for anything that has been classified as easily digested by the manufacturer. Alternatively, for non-edible chew toys, choose something that is larger than your dog’s mouth and does not contain little or easily breakable bits. When a bone is bitten into little bits, it might provide a choking threat to the dog. Because of this, you should always supervise your dog while they are chewing a bone and remove it from their mouth as soon as the bone has been worn down to a size smaller than their mouth.

Hungry dogs are more prone to ingest bone fragments or chew too forcefully, which can result in injuries to their teeth and jaws.

Further Reading

Can dogs eat the bones from a roast beef?

Why Do Dogs Like Bones?

Ember was the inspiration for today’s Wonder of the Day. “What is it about dogs that makes them eat bones?” Ember wonders. Thank you for joining us in our WONDERING, Ember! Earlier last week, we were enjoying a picnic at Wonderopolis Park when we overheard this unusual conversation between twodogs: Dog 1: Hey Charlie, how are you doing? What exactly do you have there? Is that a t-bone on the menu? Dog 2: How are you doing, George? Yes, it’s a t-bone steak. Do you want to chew on it a little? Dog 1: No, thank you very much!

Dog 2: Unfortunately, not at this time.

They claimed I was a decent guy and that they had a threat against me.

The next thing you know, the meat is on the grill and they’re tossing this bone around.

Did you wag your tail and look them in the eyes with a mournful expression?

I’m a dog after all!

It was a great missedsteak opportunity!

Giving a dog a bone without contemplating whether or not they would prefer a delicious, juicy steak has been something we’ve done many times in the past.

Recently, scientists have made some significant strides toward understanding why dogs are so fond of bones.

These ancient ancestorswere “hypercarnivores,” which means that they ate a diet that contained more than 70% of animal protein.

Modern dogs have inherited their fortified teeth and bones from their ancestors.

There are a plethora of compelling reasons for dogs to adore bones.

The bone marrow is high in fat, and the bone marrow that hides it is high in calcium.

Chewing on bones is also a delightful experience for dogs.

Chewing can also cause the production of endorphins, which are the chemicals that are connected with feelings of wellbeing.

Plaque is eliminated from the teeth when the bones scrape them, which helps to decrease the buildup of tartar.

Bones, on the other hand, are not without danger.

Other concerns include damaged teeth, gastrointestinal troubles, and infections caused by bone pieces poking holes in the stomach and intestines, among other things.

The sorts of bones that dog owners offer their canines should also be considered by the owners.

The greatest bones for dogs are rawmarrowbones.

Just make sure that the bone can’t be eaten in its whole. If you don’t want to take any chances with raw bones, there are a range of artificial bones available at pet stores that are specifically designed for dogs to chew on. These include rawhide, nylon, and starch-based bones, among others.

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